Pipes Magazine » Pipe Talk

Search Forums  
   
Tags:  No tags yet. 

Your Collection: Mostly Traditional or Non-Traditional Shapes?

(85 posts)
  • Started 2 months ago by mikethompson
  • Latest reply from Bill
  1. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,427

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    While browsing to beat the latest bout of PAD, I've come across some very conservative designs that look like they have been unchanged in 200 years, and some wild designs. I thought I would never have a crazy wild one, could you really smoke from them? I also thought that there are folks who probably hate the traditional styles, haven't we seen this all before?

    So you guys with large collections, are you biased towards one side or the other? Do you have a mix of both?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  2. bassbug

    bassbug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 895

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All traditional, all bent, but then again 6 pipes is not exactly a big collection

    I don't care who you are, you're not walking on the water while I'm fishing
    Posted 2 months ago #
  3. judcole

    Jud

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 4,774

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I am pretty much a traditional shape guy.

    Thought in the early morning, solace in time of woes,
    Peace in the hush of the twilight, balm ere my eyelids close
    Rudyard Kipling
    Posted 2 months ago #
  4. ssjones

    ssjones

    Mod
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 14,221

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    99% Traditional shapes, mostly British.

    Al

    Posted 2 months ago #
  5. fishnbanjo

    fishnbanjo

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 3,006

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Although I love traditional shapes, Billiard, Pot, Prince and Dublin, I cant help myself when a traditional has been taken to a new level by being pinched, squashed or tortured into a wild shape that allows one to see its origins yet realistically is non traditional. I have a soft spot for wild interpretations of natural items from nature being made into pipes and shapes that touch me as well.
    banjo

    Posted 2 months ago #
  6. ray47

    ray47

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2015
    Posts: 1,085

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Would Falcons and Cobs be considered traditional. If so then I'm traditional considering that's what I smoke most of the time.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  7. davet

    davet

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 3,786

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All traditional except for half a dozen freehands.

    I have a soft spot for wild interpretations of natural items from nature being made into pipes and shapes that touch me as well.

    It has served you well, that's a wonderful collection you have

    Posted 2 months ago #
  8. ashdigger

    ashdigger

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 4,992

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional, but I have a few Danish style.

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 2 months ago #
  9. timt

    timt

    Senior Member
    Joined: Jul 2018
    Posts: 922

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All traditional for me so far with my 20 or so pipes. I've eyeballed Nording freehands from time to time but can't seem to pull the trigger.

    Tim
    Posted 2 months ago #
  10. didimauw

    didimauw

    Mod
    Joined: Jul 2013
    Posts: 2,692

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All traditional. But occasionally I like the look of a Danish freehand...

    Posted 2 months ago #
  11. scloyd

    scloyd

    Senior Member
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 1,506

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All traditional except for a Poul Hansen estate pipe.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  12. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I collect dublins with all of its subcategories of zulus, horns, etc... and bulldogs, but I don’t care for the Rhodesian bulldogs or the bull cap subcategories of the standard bulldog. However, with the bulldog, I really enjoy variations created by artisans. As long as it has the two cones for the bowl and a diamond shank, I enjoy it when the artist plays with dimensions and distorted proportions within the genre.
    So, both.

    I find it funny that freehands come up as non traditional. I guess it is, but the name brings to my mind a very specific shape, which I think of as traditional. For non-traditional, Neerups and Beckers come to mind.

    Michael
    Posted 2 months ago #
  13. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2015
    Posts: 12,568

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional, with one Danish, and some carved meers- whether those'd be considered traditional or not, I don't know. Guess is they are.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  14. paulie66scandinavian

    Paul

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 2,695

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Bad traditionalist here , except for some of Castellos, mostly I favor all them British old school shapes.

    Paul The Scandinavian'
    Posted 2 months ago #
  15. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 24,908

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I think freehands are traditional by now. On that basis, my pipes are almost entirely traditional but with lots of variation and as is generally true a number of hybrids. That is, you can ponder whether this one is a brandy or an apple, and whether that one is a brandy or a volcano, a poker or a pot, and so forth. The the tradition is evident in nearly every pipe, maybe all pipes.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  16. haparnold

    Hap

    Senior Member
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 791

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    100% traditional. But then I'm a traditional guy. My collection is centered around the straight saddle-bit billiard and its variants (Lovat, etc.)

    De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum
    Posted 2 months ago #
  17. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

    The Bard Of Barlings
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 9,316

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Whilst the bulk of my shoddy assortment of derelict pipes is largely traditional in nature (Barlings are very traditional) I love an imaginatively designed pipe that smokes well.

    C'mon, what's not to like about fins and flames!

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 2 months ago #
  18. irishearl

    irishearl

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2016
    Posts: 748

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Primarily traditional here, too, allowing for some neoclassical Peterson interpretations. Have a couple of freehands I like but it's only the rare freehand I find particularly attractive. That's a lovely one you've got there sable.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  19. theosprey247

    theosprey247

    Senior Member
    Joined: Mar 2016
    Posts: 373

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional mostly Irish.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  20. judcasper

    judcasper

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2019
    Posts: 306

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional, if stubby nosewarmers count as traditional. I don't like anything that looks too 'silly'.

    I only have four pipes, three are of the typical bent style (one of these being of the stubby big ben variety) and my latest which is a straight. I bought the straight because I was growing very tired of the typical bent shape.

    As my collection slowly grows, they will be mainly made up of the straight nosewarmer type - like the Morgan Bones Stubby Pot

    Posted 2 months ago #
  21. jaytex969

    jaytex969

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2017
    Posts: 3,139

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I'm in the very traditional camp.

    Gunner, Black Frigate. Say "Hello" to my little friend!
    Posted 2 months ago #
  22. workman

    workman

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2018
    Posts: 1,535

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional. Billiards and bulldogs mostly. The bent billiard shape is what works best for me ATM.

    Smoking is one of the leading causes of all statistics.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  23. User has not uploaded an avatar

    paulfg

    Member
    Joined: Feb 2016
    Posts: 275

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    100% traditional,all of my 50 pipes except 2 Greek made Rhodesians are British & Irish pipes

    Posted 2 months ago #
  24. olkofri

    Olkofri

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 1,937

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional, save for this little trooper:


    Vauen Quixx 7

    Not the sweet, new grass with flowers is this harvesting of mine;
    Not the upland clover bloom...
    Posted 2 months ago #
  25. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2013
    Posts: 7,213

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Most of my pipes are traditional. But that's because they're just so dang collectible! You get one (for example) Peterson 106 Billiard, and then you want another from another line with a different stain, stem, etc,.

    But I love freehands and many non-traditional shapes. But freehands are all hand shaped, and no two are exactly alike. So it's really a bit more about what freehand in a group you may be looking at are more pleasing to your eye. I think, in a way, it makes them more special.

    Arrrrr, shiver me timbers! International Talk Like a Pirate Day is September the 19th!!!
    Brothers Of The Black Frigate
    Posted 2 months ago #
  26. tavol

    tavol

    Junior Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 97

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Very much a traditionalist when it comes to pipe shapes, I like the straight billiard family and the bulk of my collection follows this. I have the odd modern shape like the devil anse but then it's not exactly an 'out there' shape.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  27. warren

    warren

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2013
    Posts: 7,383

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All my briars, twenty or so, are trads.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  28. seanv

    seanv

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 775

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional with the exception of one Stanwell

    Posted 2 months ago #
  29. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,427

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I thought we'd see a majority of traditional shapes. Part of that has to be that the more non-traditional styles happen to be more expensive.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  30. User has not uploaded an avatar

    username

    Member
    Joined: Dec 2014
    Posts: 214

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gRdfX7ut8gw
    Tradition!

    Posted 2 months ago #
  31. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2013
    Posts: 7,213

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    C'mon, what's not to like about fins and flames!

    Nothing. There is absolutely nothing NOT to love about fins and flames!

    Posted 2 months ago #
  32. tschiraldi

    tschiraldi

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 1,142

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional for me, mostly Sasieni Straight Billiards and Apples. I do love some of the more traditionally shaped Castellos, as well (I'm looking at a Buldog variant now). I don't like squashed, stubby, pinched, or Danish Freehand pipes, and loathe anything metal or made from food! I realize this is all subject to change, but I have always liked pipes that, to me, look like pipes.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  33. unkleyoda

    unkleyoda

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2016
    Posts: 1,069

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional. I'm not much a fan of non-traditional shapes.


    So you say you can drink? Well, I'm from Wisconsin. Try to keep up.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  34. hugodrax

    hugodrax

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2013
    Posts: 227

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Somebody needs to link to Fiddler on the Roof. I have no skills.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  35. chasingembers

    Embers

    Captain Of The Black Frigate
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 14,932

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I keep the Savinelli and GBD yachtsman shape for clenching, but for sit down time, volcanos, blowfish, and pipe shapes that defy classification are what I like. Traditional shapes on the whole bore me.

    Damnation seize my soul if I give you quarters, or take any from you.
    -Edward Teach
    Posted 2 months ago #
  36. verporchting

    verporchting

    Member
    Joined: Dec 2018
    Posts: 186

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Traditional, although I do have one Dunhill that is a bit Art Deco looking.

    One of these days I suppose I might try a Falcon but haven't worked up to it yet. I find those vaping devices to be repugnant so anything metal just rubs me wrong I suppose even though the Falcon is old enough now to be considered a classic by some standards.

    I do admire the creative genius of the artisan pipes that I see posted here though! The beautiful designs are impressive and some of them are just pure artwork with the added bonus that you can smoke them.

    Fishbanjo has the most remarkable collection and it just boggles the mind to see the stunning artisan pipes and materials. Yowser!

    Posted 2 months ago #
  37. leafsmoker

    leafsmoker

    Member
    Joined: Oct 2017
    Posts: 270

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I have traditional and crafted pipes both. I love to have variety. But if I had only one pipe to smoke, I would be happy to have just have that one pipe regardless what it looked like.

    The walls have ears, the windows have eyes, and the wise man tells no lies.
    You can offer someone a cigar, but you can never offer someone your pipe.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  38. verporchting

    verporchting

    Member
    Joined: Dec 2018
    Posts: 186

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    ^^ This ^^

    Best. Philosophy. Ever.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  39. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The vast majority of my pipes fall into the billiard family (counting Canadian and Dublin subfamilies) or Bulldogs.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  40. 3rdguy

    3rdguy

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 1,244

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Most of my cobs are traditional but I do have a couple none.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  41. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 24,908

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    As I thought about it, it occurred to me that it would be pretty challenging to get more than few pipes that weren't in some sense traditional, especially if you'll give me the point that freehands are traditional by now. To try to get entirely pipes that defy associations with traditional shapes would be quite a task -- I'm not saying impossible, just quite a task.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  42. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    MSO, my interpretation is that traditional refers to an understood set of proportions, not just a list of names, like billiards, dublins, and bulldogs, etc...
    So, you can have bulldog that is traditional, as in this set...

    Or, they can get more experimental, within the perimeters of the genre. And, then they are "non-traditional" in their shapes.



    Posted 2 months ago #
  43. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That's funny Cosmic, I purposefully named traditional shapes because of the vagueness of "traditional" to be more specific, but your last post made me even less specific. My pipes tend to be traditional versions of the billiard and bulldog families.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  44. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My problem with billiards, is that when they play with proportions of that shape, it becomes something with a traditional name... apple, ball, brandy. So, it doesn't leave itself very open to artistic interpretation. That, and they just look like something some square 1950's dad would smoke.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  45. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My love for billiards, is that when they play with proportions of that shape, it becomes something with a traditional name... apple, ball, brandy. So, it doesn't leave itself very open to artistic interpretation. That, and they just look like something some square 1950's dad would smoke.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  46. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

    The Bard Of Barlings
    Joined: Jun 2013
    Posts: 9,316

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Cosmic has it correct. It's not just about names, it's about the proportions, which were well understood and fairly rigorous. Even the variants, such as billiard chubby, or billiard curvet, followed proportions for shaping.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  47. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Which is to say, I like to judge a maker by their execution of the billiard and get an artistic pipe later based on that judgement.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  48. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Crash, I hear that a lot, and it just sounds stupid to me. If I want a bulldog, I judge the maker on how he plays with those proportions of the bulldog. If a maker makes a fantastic billiard, that doesn't make a flippin' difference on how he handles the bulldog shape.

    I think when people say that, they mean that they use that artist's billiard as a way to rate the artist overall against other artists. It doesn't necessarily mean that they will excel at other shapes, just because they can do that one really well.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  49. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    As a pipe maker, I can see a lot of their skill in the shaping of a billiard. It really makes a difference to me to see what their base line skill is and where their strengths lie. But I also really like a good billiard, so some of that is certainly personal.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  50. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That being said,

    that doesn't make a flippin' difference on how he handles the bulldog shape
    is an incredibly accurate statement. I could argue a few other shapes, but the bulldog is so much different, even requiring a completely different lathe setup and, depending on bent or not, may barely see a lathe. I'm not saying my way is right for everyone, but it works for me.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  51. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I think we agree, it just took you a minute to see what I am saying, ha ha.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  52. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Take slow to begin with and multiply by Monday.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  53. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Ha ha!!

    Posted 2 months ago #
  54. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 24,908

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Cosmic, interesting point about variations within a given shape, and how that can also be non-traditional. Sixten Iversson's design for the Stanwell pot is sort of a squashed hemisphere, very un-potlike. My Peterson B11's are often currently sold as volcano shaped, but used to be consistently sold as brandy shapes. Under this revised definition, many of my pipes tend toward non-traditional. I haven't quite figured out if my Kaywoodie Drinkless Ruf-Tone us a pot, author, or what.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  55. saltedplug

    saltedplug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 1,913

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    In other things like architecture my tastes are more wide-ranging. I love art deco as well as gothic. But in pipes my tastes are very boring. billiards, etc. I find that lattice Konstantin Shekita in the OP's post hideous as it has no discernible shape, and is thus a blob whose only achievement is to be covered with holes while not imploding. BTW, still on sale at smokingpipes for the paltry price orf $1600.00. I guess they price it per hole.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  56. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    IMO, we tend to have a disorder that makes us constantly want to pigeonhole everything and pigeonhole, within pigeonholes. . Some names are just overkill, IMO, Brandys, Rhodesian bulldogs, zulus, etc... We could probably understand each other perfectly with only about five pipe shape names to describe the entirely of all pipe shapes out there.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  57. crashthegrey

    crashthegrey

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2015
    Posts: 2,747

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I like the use of ridiculous names when we are actually trying to describe a pipe to each other, as in the brandy, my favorite being one that looked just like my favorite brandy snifter but inverted. I don't think we need to try so hard to actually classify them as such, though.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  58. mso489

    mso489

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 24,908

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The words/reality schism will always be there, but words used well can bring the object or thought within range, sometimes.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  59. saltedplug

    saltedplug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 1,913

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The words/reality schism will always be there, but words used well can bring the object or thought within range, sometimes.

    Well said! To expand a bit, the outcome of nature/nurture predisposes us to the experiences that we will have, fate/destiny, the outcome of which is that we each have our own definitions for words even though the assigned meanings are in black and white in the dictionary; the upshot of which is that communicating by words is subject to idiosyncratic natures.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  60. olkofri

    Olkofri

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 1,937

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    In other things like architecture my tastes are more wide-ranging. I love art deco as well as gothic. But in pipes my tastes are very boring. billiards, etc. I find that lattice Konstantin Shekita in the OP's post hideous as it has no discernible shape, and is thus a blob whose only achievement is to be covered with holes while not imploding. BTW, still on sale at smokingpipes for the paltry price orf $1600.00. I guess they price it per hole.

    Same here.

    And nicely written! Haven't read something like that since Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House and The Painted Word.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  61. luigi

    luigi

    Member
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 150

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    All traditional for me. I already feel embarrassed enough to appear with a pipe in public, one of those "futuristic" shapes would make me even more uncomfortable. Just joking, I couldn't care less about all the rubberneckers who stare at me every single time.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  62. saltedplug

    saltedplug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 1,913

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thank you but The Painted Word in every way surpasses my writing, The ideas are more witty and complex and more finely drawn, and the commentary on modern art as being the first art to require a scorecard for its interpretation is fine satire.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  63. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,427

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    By traditional, I mean a pipe that one can just look at, match up with the shape chart, and identify.

    Great illustrative post Cosmic.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  64. olkofri

    Olkofri

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2017
    Posts: 1,937

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That's the 'canonical' definition of traditional, Mike. Doesn't have anything to do with time periods. Of course there are subtle variations with a given shape from different makers, but the basic shape is still there; kinda like with the three types of body –not all ectomorphs look like clones but the basic geometry is there.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  65. bnichols23

    Bill

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 2,191

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    just look at, match up with the shape chart

    I guess that would put me about 70-30 non-traditional. I've got a few outliers like an old Sav Autograph Giant sandblast. I'll see if I can find an image of it & if not I'll try to take a snap tonight. It's basically like a bloated blackjack. Seriously. Not kidding.

    Head Black Frigate keelhauler, boss powder monkey, & troublemaker 1st class.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  66. workman

    workman

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2018
    Posts: 1,535

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I think some of the traditional shapes seem to be natural or logical shapes for a pipe. Apple, billiard, pot, dublin, cutty, they are just vessels for tobacco. I guess the bulldog, now a traditional shape, must have seemed pretty extravagant at some point.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  67. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 17,953

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I did a huge post on bulldogs at one time. They were the first pipe shape created on those slot and peg frazing machines that fully created the pipes by machine in the late 1800's. They had a brass cap that made them look more like a billiard, but guys would tear that brass cap off, because they just looked too frilly for men. Thus the bulldog was born. They were the first fully frazed stummels, completely machine made. That is why they look like they do. But, since artists have elaborated on their shape.

    But, funny, the billiard to me looks like the least natural. While the dublin is a bent funnel or horn, the billiard has to be fancifully shaped to look the least natural of all of the pipe shapes, IMO.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  68. workman

    workman

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2018
    Posts: 1,535

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I don't think I get what you're saying about the billiard, Cosmic. As I see it, it's a no-brainer. A cup and a tube, basically.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  69. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 218

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I tend to like the classic shapes, pipes made in the 50’s & before. Partly it’s a like of more gentile times, as well as I like traditional sized pipe dimensions.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  70. mikethompson

    mikethompson

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2016
    Posts: 3,427

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    because they just looked too frilly for men

    So without those insecure men over a hundred years ago, we would never have the Bulldog?

    Posted 2 months ago #

Reply »

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   autumnfog, daniel7, adforbes