Royal Yacht, A Short-Short Review

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Ziggywm

Member
Sep 9, 2019
263
1,957
Fargo, ND
actually egg tastes kind of like chicken but more immature.
On a serious note, what IS the chicken taste? We can only preface with the word "like", as you did, and speak in metaphors. Taste is an experience and all experiences are individualistic. We have some agreed upon "paint brush" terms as I call them like sweet and sour, bitter, spicy (but what spice?), harsh, hot...etc. Hence, we sample, try, experiment and become more experienced. But, that experience is as individual as your fingerprint.
 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
33,710
26,737
My subjective experience is that the flavoring, plum or whatever it is, is decidedly subordinate, supporting the good Virginia leaf but not overreaching. It is, to me, tobacco forward, which is how I like my aromatics. Clearly, others don't taste it this way at all, but that's how taste works, I guess.
 

ofafeather

Preferred Member
Apr 26, 2020
1,771
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Where NY, CT & MA meet
My subjective experience is that the flavoring, plum or whatever it is, is decidedly subordinate, supporting the good Virginia leaf but not overreaching. It is, to me, tobacco forward, which is how I like my aromatics. Clearly, others don't taste it this way at all, but that's how taste works, I guess.
I’m with you on that 100%. Plus it’s one of the few tobaccos that I can push and push and it never bites or gets harsh even in a hot pipe.
 

danimalia

Preferred Member
Sep 2, 2015
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San Francisco Bay Area, USA
So how would y'all categorize Royal Yacht?

Like, in which notebook section would I scribble my tasting notes, what area of the tobacco shelf would it sit on, what column in the tobacco database?

It's listed as an Aromatic on Tobacco Reviews, but would you place it more as a Virginia or Virginia-Based blend (that happens to have slight topping added)?

Semi-Aromatic?

"Other"?
I'd consider it a Virginia with a topping. Personally, I don't think its more aggressively flavored than many VAs that don't advertise any added flavorings. Obviously, YMMV, and maybe I got a mellowed tin. I was expecting something very strongly flavored and for me, RY just tasted like a VaPer. I should revisit it, though, as it's been several years since I had any.
 

anotherbob

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2019
6,006
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In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
On a serious note, what IS the chicken taste? We can only preface with the word "like", as you did, and speak in metaphors. Taste is an experience and all experiences are individualistic. We have some agreed upon "paint brush" terms as I call them like sweet and sour, bitter, spicy (but what spice?), harsh, hot...etc. Hence, we sample, try, experiment and become more experienced. But, that experience is as individual as your fingerprint.
pretty much hit the nail on the head.
 

Ziggywm

Member
Sep 9, 2019
263
1,957
Fargo, ND
I'd consider it a Virginia with a topping. Personally, I don't think its more aggressively flavored than many VAs that don't advertise any added flavorings. Obviously, YMMV, and maybe I got a mellowed tin. I was expecting something very strongly flavored and for me, RY just tasted like a VaPer. I should revisit it, though, as it's been several years since I had any.
As a rule of thumb (and there are exceptions as there are a number of VA types, even depending on where grown - soil conditions, weather, etc. - its similar to wine) VA leaf, especially Bright is flue cured. The heat from the wood fired flues kills the leaf quickly setting the sugars and keeping starch from forming. This is unlike Burley which is air cured. Consequently, Burley is more absorbent then VA and can be heavily flavored. Because of the sugar in VA leaf, especially Bright, it must be processed into cakes, steamed, aged - fermented - to make it smokable otherwise it will burn your tongue and palette. If flavored its usually a light, alcohol based natural flavoring, like whisky or vanilla, etc. In the UK its against the law to adulterate tobacco with anything artificial, like glycol, nitrates or any chemicals (preservatives). Tobacco falls under the spice laws passed by Parliament in the 17th C. Remember, London was the spice processing capital of the world for centuries. More exploration was done by HM ships for spices then gold. When ships came into port unscrupulous importers could easily add anything to the spices or tobacco, especially hay or straw to add weight. This is why they gravitated to the vacuum tin; I don't know, but this too may have been a Dunhill innovation; they certainly were the first to vacuum tin cigarettes.
But its also why American drug store varieties were/are mostly Burley based blends, heavily flavored and adulterated with glycol and preservatives to increase shelf life by keeping it moist.
 
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Road To Pines

Junior Member
Sep 2, 2020
79
127
Ontario, Canada
As a rule of thumb (and there are exceptions as there are a number of VA types, even depending on where grown - soil conditions, weather, etc. - its similar to wine) VA leaf, especially Bright is flue cured. The heat from the wood fired flues kills the leaf quickly setting the sugars and keeping starch from forming. This is unlike Burley which is air cured. Consequently, Burley is more absorbent then VA and can be heavily flavored. Because of the sugar in VA leaf, especially Bright, it must be processed into cakes, steamed, aged - fermented - to make it smokable otherwise it will burn your tongue and palette. If flavored its usually a light, alcohol based natural flavoring, like whisky or vanilla, etc. In the UK its against the law to adulterate tobacco with anything artificial, like glycol, nitrates or any chemicals (preservatives). Tobacco falls under the spice laws passed by Parliament in the 17th C. Remember, London was the spice processing capital of the world for centuries. More exploration was done by HM ships for spices then gold. When ships came into port unscrupulous importers could easily add anything to the spices or tobacco, especially hay or straw to add weight. This is why they gravitated to the vacuum tin; I don't know, but this too may have been a Dunhill innovation; they certainly were the first to vacuum tin cigarettes.
But its also why American drug store varieties were/are mostly Burley based blends, heavily flavored and adulterated with glycol and preservatives to increase shelf life by keeping it moist.
Fascinating.
 
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Architeuthis

New member
Jan 17, 2021
46
267
Anyone know how the current Peterson RY compares with McConnell Paddington which is the K&K version? I have a couple of tins on the way to try but may not get to them for a while due to having so much open.
Very similar. Before Peterson's reissue of the Dunhill blends, RY was only available from resellers for very inflated prices. When McConnell put out its line of Dunhill "clones", I was delighted to find Paddington hitting all the familiar notes that RY did. Since Peterson re-released RY, I've had them back to back and find them very close. Peterson's version, to me, has a bit more richness/depth in the underlying Virginias but it is interesting to see how much influence marketing/branding has. Load a bowl of each in a blind taste test and let that be your guide...
 
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Lbauer12

New member
Feb 20, 2021
20
210
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Bloomington, IL
One of my favorites. I bought about 50 tins when I heard Dunhill wasn’t going to be in the tobacco business anymore. Overreaction in hindsight I guess since the Peterson version is the same.
 
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