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How I Make A Carmette Pipe (Pic Heavy)

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  • Started 3 years ago by clickklick
  • Latest reply from clickklick
  1. clickklick

    clickklick

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    I am learning as I go and am investing in proper tooling (just got a lathe recently). I thank everyone for the support thus far. I still have a very long way to go, but thought this may be a worthwhile thread to start to show the progress of pipemaking as I go. It is quite a bit extra work as I don't have an easy smartphone to simply click and upload with. My hopes is that at least a few of you enjoy it. This is my method, other maker's methods may differ. I am self-taught up to this point via researching on the internet and input from various people/sources.

    With that, lets begin. Not shown are block selection, shape drawing and line drawing on the block, and cutting the lined shape on the bandsaw. Lets bring on the pics so far!

    For ease of picture following, We'll call the first picture Step 1 and go onward from there.

    Step 1: The Stummel needs to be mounted in the chuck according to the center lines that have been drawn on the block. I use a live center on the lathe (the pointy round thing) to help line it up.

    Step 2: Once I am happy with the mortise line up, I start the mortise hole with a center bit. This allows the other drilling processes to remain centered without much wobble or devation. (If you don't do this step, the bit tends to wander and the hole never drills to center.

    Step 3: I then drill the mortise with a 5/16" drill bit to the intended depth. You only want to go deep enough for the tenon to be secured, while keeping the draft hole line close to the center intercept junction at the base of the mortise. (if the draft hole is not centered in the mortise base, passing a cleaner will be impossible)

    Step 4: I then countersink the entrance of the mortise hole. This provides a nice smooth centering action for insertion of the stem's tenon.

    Step 5: Before I move the stummel from this position, I turn the shank and face it. If this happens to be a curved or asymmetrical shank, this step would be done by hand. For this shape however, it is straight and symmetrical, so I can get it started on the lathe.

    Step 6: The stummel is then adjusted and recentered to hit the correct angle of the draft hole. I use a 5/32" drill bit to drill the draft hole. It is paramount that this does not drill off center or go too deep, as the tobacco chamber must line up with this step.

    Step 7: I then unmount the stummel from the chuck and remount it. This involves recentering everything for the tobacco chamber, again, using the live center as a reference point.

    Step 8: Just like with the mortise, I start the tobacco chamber hole with a center bit to ensure the rest of the drilling process goes as planned.

    Step 9: I then start drilling the chamber. Here I am using a nice english bit I bought from Ken Lamb in Chicago. This is a 7/8 bit and drills a nice smooth chamber, although this particular pipe requires a 1" chamber, so I will hit it with a spade bit in the next step to finish. If this were simply a 7/8" hole, i'd just be using this bit. (Drilling the entire chamber with a spade bit can be a very loud and chattery process, so I prefer to drill it with an english bit most of the way first.) I have to make sure not to go too deep and overdrill the chamber.

    Step 10: I am now finishing up the tobacco chamber with a 1" spade bit that has been ground into a U shape. Depth on this step is paramount and a few passes have to be made in order to ensure that the draft hole enters the chamber as close to the bottom as possible. I am still working on my technique for this, but have been learning very quickly and should have it down in a few more pipes.

    Step 11: After the chamber is drilled, I face the rim of the pipe. Since this shape is round, I am also grooving a rim edge in the top to help with keeping symmetry during hand shaping. This concludes the stummel's time on the lathe.

    Step 12: As soon as it is off the lathe, it is time to start rough shaping on the 5" sanding wheel. I use 50-80 grit for this step depending on what I have on hand. Here I use a foam backed disc.

    Step 13: There is a lot of shaping to be done on the disc, making some progress slowly.

    Step 14: Finally I am satisfied with the rough shaping and the time on the coarse grit disc is over. Now it is time to start work on the stem.

    ......... TO BE CONTINUED .......

    Hobbyist Pipemaker - Carmette Pipes
    Posted 3 years ago #
  2. randelli

    randelli

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    So cool! Thanks for sharing so far.

    "A man who carries a cat by the tail learns something he can learn in no other way" - Mark Twain

    KG5QDZ
    Posted 3 years ago #
  3. jmatt

    jmatt

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    I'm already impressed!!! Very nice job on the pipe, and on this "How it's done" thread. Thanks!!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  4. rfernand

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    Most enjoyable! Thanks for sharing a peek behind the curtain.

    Dunhill will return.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  5. jacks6

    jacks6

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    Super cool!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Alright, got a little shop time tonight after the kiddos went to bed. Started some work on the stem. Here we go!

    Step 15: Cut the rod stock to desired length on the bandsaw. This is where the smell of rotten eggs or wet farts begins! I am using a very fat piece of German Cumberland.

    Step 16: I stick the rod in my lathe chuck, face the end, and then lightly touch it with the centering bit.

    Step 17: I then use a 1/16" drill bit to drill a pilot hole into the slot end. Gotta give thanks to Sasquatch for this little tip.

    Step 18: Now I flip the rod stock over and rechuck it. I then face the end, this will be the tenon side.

    Step 19: I center drill the tenon end to prepare for drilling the air hole.

    Step 20: I used a 5/32" tapered drill bit to slowly drill the air hole. You have to make small passes and clear chips and do this slowly. You don't want to burn the rod and you don't want the chips creating any ridges or waves in the hole.

    Step 21: I then mark the depth of the tenon with my calipers. This line helps guide my cuts.

    Step 22: First pass is made as a start of the tenon cutting.

    Step 23: After multiple cuts, the tenon is finally finished.

    Step 24: I file the tenon edge to make it round, this helps when inserting it into the mortise, along with the mortise taper.

    Step 25: I then test fit the stummel. I am checking for snugness of the tenon in the mortise as well as depth of the tenon in the mortise. I am also measuring how much more material I need to take off of the rod to match the stummel shank diameter.

    Step 26: I remove the stummel and start taking a small amount of material of the rod diameter to match the current stummel shank diameter.

    Step 27: I flip the rod and remove material from the rest.

    Step 28: I test fit it to the stummel again, this time paying attention to the rod to shank diameter.

    Step 29: I remove it from the stummel and use a dremel tool to cut the beginning of the slot.

    Step 30: The results look like this.

    Step 31: I use a Kemper Pottery Saw to start cutting the funnel/v shape in the slot. Some use a modifed scroll saw blade, but I picked this technique up from Walt Cannoy (thanks Walt!) It works well for me, but I find I either bend a lot or break alot of these, especially when using them on acrylic rod.

    Step 32: Half the funnel is made, very rough at this point.

    Step 33: The rest of the funnel is then rough cut.

    Step 34: I then use a needle file to clean the slot and further the funneling. Thanks to David McCarter for turning me onto this file! It is an awesome tool to have!

    Step 35: Cleaned up slot, for now, still needs refinement, which will come later.

    Not really a step, but I wet the block and check progress. This one has promise to remain smooth, but only final sanding will tell. Still a ways to go until then. This is all for now.

    TO BE CONTINUED......

    Posted 3 years ago #
  7. jvnshr

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    What an interesting thread. Thanks a lot for sharing this with us Adam.

    Javan
    Posted 3 years ago #
  8. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

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    Very informative, you are to be commended for showing people who have never been around a lathe the steps.

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. papipeguy

    papipeguy

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    Fascinating presentation. Thanks for doing this.

    Blowin' smoke since 1970.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  10. agnosticpipe

    Orley

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    Great show and tell! I love that you were thoughtful enough to share this process. I have never been tempted to make pipes, just restoring them is all I'm up for, but clearly there is a lot of work to the making of a pipe. Thank you!

    The pipe smoker formerly know as agnostic pipe
    "Fried food, hard liquor, and tobacco, that's the holy trinity!"- Stacy Keach
    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. derfatdutchman

    derfatdutchman

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    Great post! The machinist in me loves to see how other people make things. I will be looking forward to th upcoming parts.

    "The value of tobacco is best understood when it is the last you possess, and there is no chance of getting more."
    Bismark
    Posted 3 years ago #
  12. clickklick

    clickklick

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    I think this adds to this subject. I just receive the most recent edition of the NASPC Pipe Collector, and my work made the COVER!!!!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  13. daveinlax

    daveinlax

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    I just receive the most recent edition of the NASPC Pipe Collector, and my work made the COVER!!!!

    I just opened my a few minutes to see your work on the cover and featured on the boarder trough out. Lorie and I are trilled and very proud of you!! This is very exciting.
    The pictorial walk though is really good. Having hod to personally inspected your shop I found it to be well ventilated, laid out with top notch tools! It's really a good space.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. jmatt

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    I think this adds to this subject. I just receive the most recent edition of the NASPC Pipe Collector, and my work made the COVER!!!!

    Congrats!!!! Very cool watching this.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. jerwynn

    jerwynn

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    Absolutely and truly

    Thanks for sharing! Looking forward to more to come!!

    “Deep peace of the running wave to you.
 Deep peace of the flowing air to you.
 Deep peace of the quiet earth to you.
 Deep peace of the shining stars to you.
    Deep peace of the infinite peace to you." - Fiona Macleod
    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. ejames

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    Congrats on the NASPC cover ! Haven't gotten my copy yet.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. clickklick

    clickklick

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    I just realized I should have finished the pipe completely, and then put all the pictures up. Now that I've started posting as I go, if I bung this thing up, you all are going to be disappointed. Sometimes I think I have great ideas only to have the flaw in my plans realized shortly after lol!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  18. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Can anybody guess, without looking at the first set of pictures, what shape I'm aiming for with the progress pics?

    If so, I guess I'm doing it right!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  19. jefff

    jefff

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    Author.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. clickklick

    clickklick

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    a chubby one at that!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  21. jvnshr

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    We are waiting for more pictures, just saying

    Posted 3 years ago #
  22. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Oh I know! I have a busy full time job and kids. So shop time can be limited

    Posted 3 years ago #
  23. clickklick

    clickklick

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    OK, we are on to some rough stem shaping. This set of pictures is a bit over 2 hours of shop time. Very manual intensive and the part I normally screw up the most!

    On to the pics!

    Step 37: First thing I do is mark some lines of the draft hole so I know how deep NOT to go!

    Step 38: Then I take it to the belt sander, I used to do this on the sanding disc, but I just picked up this belt sander at a garage sale, so I figure now would be the best time to try it.

    Step 39: I rough both sides and check it. I probably could have gone deeper, but I tend to go too deep and screw it up on the disc sander, so I decided I better play it safe with this.

    Step 40: I then bust out my Iwasaki flat file, this thing has razor teeth and can remove a ton of material very quickly!

    Step 41: More progress with the Iwasaki File.

    Step 42: Once I get enough meat off with the Iwasaki, I switch to a half round bastard file. This is a bit finer and cleans up the gouge marks, as well as allows me to get tighter angles.

    Step 43: I also use it to thin the bit, not too much, but it gets me closer.

    Step 44: It is starting to take shape, especially getting thinner behind the button.

    Step 45: I then switch to my Micro file (thanks to David McCarter for turning me onto this file!). This is finer than the half round bastard file and allows me to realy clean up the lines, albeit very slowly.

    Step 46: The profile is slowly cleaning up nicely.

    Step 47: Smoothing more with the micro file and starting to reduce the height of the button.

    Step 48: Once I have a general rough shape I'm happy with, I need to fit it to the pipe. I insert the stem in the pipe and focus on the shank to stem junction. I use the micro file to get a rough profile that matches the shank to the base of the stem. Keep in mind, all of this is still just rough shaping.

    Step 49: The aftermath on my homemade downdraft table, I have to clean it up now!

    Step 50: Progress peek. The stummel and stem are now both finished rough shaping. I stopped at this point and the next process will be to start fine shaping.

    Not sure when I'll get back in the shop. I'm a bit overcommitted at this point and have 4 other pipes awaiting the arrival of my new compressor so I can start officially sandblasting (supposed to arrive on Monday). Over the weekend, I will keep going on this one as much as I can.

    TO BE CONTINUED . . . . .

    Posted 3 years ago #
  24. lohengrin

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    Waiting for the next thank you for sharing.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  25. sladeburns

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    I love pipe making process shots and the author is one of my favorite shapes. I'll make some popcorn and wait for the finale.

    Looks great so far! Great job!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  26. papipeguy

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    Great progress on this pipe. I can't wait for the next installment.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  27. ahmadothman

    Ahmad Othman

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    That's getting great.. and damn it man, you got me hooked more than Netflix

    “I believe that pipe smoking contributes to a somewhat calm and objective judgement in all human affairs.” - Albert Einstein
    Posted 3 years ago #
  28. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Thank you guys! Your comments make the extra effort of doing this very worthwhile for me!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  29. clickklick

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    Got some more shop time in. More pictures will be up late tonight when I can get them off the camera. Fine shaping is done, next will be the finishing processes.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  30. jefff

    jefff

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    awesome!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  31. randelli

    randelli

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    We are on pins and needles!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  32. ssavarimuthu

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    This is fantastic! Can't wait to see more.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    sfduke

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    Beautiful work Adam on the 320 EX ;). Thanks for sharing your expertise.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  34. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Since this pipe will be headed for the sandblaster after speaking to the client, there will be a delay until my new compressor arrives. Supposed to arrive Monday.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  35. ahmadothman

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    Ah, such bad luck that this beauty will not be smooth.. I'd have loved to see it done in a smooth finish.. But I guess it's the client taste that matters ..

    Posted 3 years ago #
  36. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Here are the last set of pictures for a while. Once the compressor arrives I have 4 pipes ahead of this one, all waiting to be blasted. So this one will fall back in line. I apologize for this, as I had hoped this would remain a smooth and I could finish it before starting up on the rest of the blasts. Either way, this thread will continue to capture the start to finish progress when time allows.

    OK, here we go, finish shaping. Very manual, very tedious, very difficult to maintain symmetry ( at least for my current hand skill level)

    Step 51: Time to clean up the Stummel, I start by getting into the tighter corners with an Iwasaki 3mm Round File, This thing doesn't look like much of a file, but it tears through briar very quickly!

    Step 52: Once I'm done tightening up the corners, I switch to my half round bastard file and start refining the entire profile.

    Step 53: When I am happy with the side profile, I work on the front symmetry and overall roundness. This is the part I never seem to be satisfied with and spend a long time on. I wonder if there is ultimately an easier way to attain nice symmetry, but this is how I do it, improving each time, little by little.

    Step 54: I notice that my shank line has a janky angle where it flows into the bowl. It is more appealing to try and make this line seamless.

    Step 55: Once I am done with the files, I have to remove all tooling marks. I start with 120 grit sandpaper and go over the entire stummel. I put the stem back in for this part. Any work around the shank needs to have the stem in place or you will never keep a seamless appearance of the stem to shank junction.

    Step 56: Once I'm happy with getting most of the tooling marks out of the stummel, I start work on finish shaping the stem. I start on the side with the half round bastard file.

    Step 57: Once The sides are cleaned up, I use a strip of 120 grit sandpaper and the "Boot Strap" method to further mend to shank to stem line.

    Step 58: A quick peek at the progress so far.

    Step 59: When I'm happy with that, I remove the stem from the stummel to further refine it. Since I know that the base of the stem is now shaped to fit the shank, I base all of my tapering off of that shape. I start dialing in the profile with the Micro File.

    Step 60: I continue filing and filing and filing . . . Did I mention there is a LOT of filing to be done?

    Step 61: I think I have a decent taper now, the bit is a bit thick at the moment, but my hands are sore so I am going to give them a less strenuous task next.

    Step 62: It is time to start profiling the button!

    Step 63: Gotta do both sides.

    Step 64: Dialing in the overall arches of the button and defining the corners.

    Step 65: Rounding the button profile, still using the micro file. I tend to leave a bit more material on here as ebonite seems to shrink when buffing (I probably press too hard ). It is much easier to remove too much material while buffing ebonite, than it is buffing acrylic.

    Step 66: For more comfortable mouth feel, the corners of the button should get tapered.

    Step 67: I continue to file the bit, right behind the button. I check thickness. I am aiming for 4.14 to 4.17mm. This is still too thick. This is the step I tend to ruin the stems on. I like to take off too much, or thin the corners of the profile too much. After all this work on the stem so far, a fatal error can be heartbreaking.

    Step 68: More filing, and I finally have my 4.14mm bit thickness. Even though this is a chubby author and some would say this is too thin and prone to bite through, I am leaving the bit fairly wide and the button slightly taller. So unless the owner is a hard clencher, we should be alright.

    Step 69: Once the bit thickness and resulting taper profile are complete with the micro file, I remove much of the tooling gouges using 120 grit and the "Boot Strap" method. I am careful to keep the sandpaper away from the base of the stem as it is very easy to round the base or change the shape. Then when you put it back in the stummel, it no longer fits flush all the way around.

    Step 70: Coming along nicely. I am stopping here. This set of pictures is about 3 hours of shop time.

    TO BE CONTINUED ......

    Posted 3 years ago #
  37. captpat

    captpat

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    Fascinating keep the pictures coming.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    sfduke

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    Too bad this one will be sandblasted since there are beautiful lines in the briar.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  39. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Should be some nice ring grain after blasting.

    I was blasting pipes in my dreams last night. Seriously! Lol!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  40. jvnshr

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    Thanks again for your effort. We cannot appreciate it enough.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  41. crashthegrey

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    This is one of the greatest threads ever. Thank you for sharing.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  42. clickklick

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    Blaster is officially fully operational! Are you ready?

    Ive decided to finish this one as I am so close to being done with it. I'll have some pics up late tonight!

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    sfduke

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    Awesome! Cannot wait see the pics. The real question is how did you carry the compressor down

    Posted 3 years ago #
  44. clickklick

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    Ok all, this is the final set of progress pics. Pipe is now complete!

    The final stretch. Thank you all who have been following along with this! It has been a long journey! Here we go!

    Step 71: I am using electrical tape to mask off the areas I don't want the sandblasting to effect.

    Step 72: Taking it to the blasting cabinet.

    Step 73: Here are the results. Unfortunately I ran into a pit on one side that went deep. I blasted it out, but it left the stummel a bit mis-shapen. This is my first blast on briar wood and the first time I'm using my new compressor, so overall I am very happy with the results. I really hope the client doesn't mind.




    Step 74: Selecting the stain color. I am using powdered leather dye.

    Step 75: I mix it with Denatured Alcohol inside of a mason jar.

    Step 76: I use a junk piece of briar to check the color. I had to add more denatured alcohol 4 times in order to get the correct dark brown walnut color. It started out almost black.

    Step 77: I stain the stummel using a brush.

    Step 78: Here is how it looks immediately after applying the stain.

    Step 79: I set the stain with a light coat of shellac mixed with denatured alcohol. It is about a 30/70 mix. I also take this opportunity to blot the stain with a paper towel to lighten the sandblast peaks a little. This is a controversial topic to some, using shellac. I choose to use it for a variety of reasons and know from personal experience it does NOT effect the smoking quality of the briar. The main reason to use it is to set the stain so that it does not come off on the smoker's fingers when the pipe gets warm from smoking.

    Step 80: Here it is immediately after the shellac and blot process.

    Step 81: Now it's back to finish the stem. We left off having sanded to 120 grit, so now it is time for 220 grit.

    Step 82: I 220 Grit sand the slot as well.

    Step 83: 320 Grit

    Step 84: And the slot.

    Step 85: 400 Grit

    Step 86: Can you guess what's next? Yup . . . the slot!

    Step 87: Now I tape of the stem close to the button to protect what is finished from the next step.

    Step 88: I use a nut/fret seating file to make a crisp button crease. (Thanks to George Dibos for this method!)

    Step 89: I then switch back to sandpaper, this time I wet sand with 600 grit.

    Step 90: And the slot with 600 Grit, I leave the paper dry for this step.

    Step 91: I have 3 cotton shoe laces which I have one end prepped with a wire to allow me to thread it through the stem hole (Thanks to Rad Davis for this method!)

    Step 92: I charge the string with red tripoli, and polish the inside of the stem airway. I repeat this step using a new string with white diamond compound and then again with a fresh dry string with a tiny bit of wax applied.

    Step 93: I heat up the stem with a heat gun until it becomes pliable, careful not to melt or boil/pit the ebonite.

    Step 94: I then bend the stem and allow it to cool so that it holds its shape.

    Step 95: I prep my buffing wheel with red tripoli.

    Step 96: I start polishing the stem with the red tripoli compound.

    Step 97: Stem Check, it's getting a bit shiny.

    Step 98: I switch to my white diamond buff and charge it.

    Step 99: I polish the stem with the white diamond buff.

    Step 100: Another Stem Check, getting shinier!

    Step 101: I switch to my wax buff and charge it with carnuba wax, a little goes a long way here.

    Step 102: I polish with my wax buff, a very light touch is all that is required.

    Step 103: Another Stem Check. All waxed up.

    Step 104: Time to Stamp.

    Step 105: First pipe I've ever stamped . . . Don't think I did bad at all!

    OK That's It! Pipe has been completed, start to finish. I hope you all enjoyed the ride!

    Finished pics will follow soon!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  45. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Here it is! All finished!

    My only complaint is from that pit that developed, which threw the blast off. I'd be proud to smoke this one though. I hope the client feels the same!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  46. jefff

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    Great thread. For all of us who thought we might give pipe making a wack, this was invaluable.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  47. ejames

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    Great thread and nice work !

    Posted 3 years ago #
  48. papipeguy

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    A wonderful conclusion. This should be saved for the novice pipe maker. A great tutorial. Thank you so much for chronicling this for us.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  49. jefff

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    Yeah.... I have decided to buy pipes rather than make pipes.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  50. derfatdutchman

    derfatdutchman

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    Great looking pipe, and a great post! Again, I love seeing the process of things being made. Some say the spirit of craftsmanship is dead, to that I say bull, your post is a prime example that it is alive and well.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  51. jvnshr

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    Amazing final. Thanks a lot Adam.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  52. clickklick

    clickklick

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    Thanks everyone!

    I wasn't trying to discourage anyone from making a pipe LOL! I was just showing how I make one. I think part of realizing the difference between a factory pipe and a handmade pipe can be lost in just looking at the price tag.

    I think truly appreciating what goes into hand making a pipe can be beneficial to collectors. Especially eyeopening to some who believe a pipe is as simple as two holes meeting together. If that were true, we never would have improved and we would all still be simply digging bowls in the soil and shoving a rod into the bottom and smoking like the primitives once did.

    Also, This pipe just got sent off to its new home. I am working on a trio of other chubby authors with horn inlays. If anyone is interested in the work that goes into a simple horn inlay, let me know and I can post pics as I go.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  53. jvnshr

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    I am interested, if that counts

    Posted 3 years ago #
  54. clickklick

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    If I can interest a single person with the effort, it is worth it! So absolutely you count!

    I have a Gremlin pipe to finish and then will get back on the horn inlays. So I'll throw the pics up as I proceed!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  55. jvnshr

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    I am sure that others will also get interested once you upload the pictures Good luck!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  56. lifesizehobbit

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    Adam - as one who loves hotrodding and working on cars, I can appreciate your passion for pipe making. If someone so much as asks me to saw a straight line, it's a likely trip to the ER.

    Thanks for sharing your passion and talent with those of us less gifted with The Wood.

    Success to you sir!

    Dave "Black Frigate Stowaway"
    Posted 3 years ago #
  57. draco

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    I wondered what your spin on an Author might be...Beautiful!!! One of my favorite shapes and your version is great, you have a natural talent!!! I bought an old 1933 South Bend lathe years ago in hopes of doing metal work and after I got into pipes I hoped to try my hand at them but health and money issues have forced me into moving and I sold my lathe, drill press and compressor so that dream may stay a dream. It's good to see it can be done and in your case done very well indeed.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  58. clickklick

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    Inlay time

    Parts are cut drilled and faced on the lathe


    They are scored and roughed up with a file to give the epoxy something to stick to.


    Epoxy is applied and I chuck them up on my lathe to provide a tight pressure. This sits overnight to allow the epoxy to cure.


    The horn gets roughed into round on the sanding disc.


    The diameter is then dialed in true on the lathe. Then the rest of the stem gets shaped.


    After polishing here is the result.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  59. ravkesef

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    Adam, words fail when I try and describe my sense of awe at your craftsmanship. I've just finished gazing at my handmade pipes, appreciating the labor that has gone into them, to change a piece of wood and some hard rubber into a work of art. Seeing you go through the process, step by step was a rare treat, and I'm certain that your client will admire his new pipe and give it the love and reverence it deserves, as he gently blows puffs of smoke toward the ceiling. Thanks so much for sharing your skill with us.

    Eric
    Posted 3 years ago #
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    shotime

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    really enjoyed that, thanks very much

    Posted 3 years ago #
  61. buckaroo

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    Wow, missed this thread the first time around. Thx for posting. Fantastic.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  62. ssavarimuthu

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    Just fantastic. Love this thread, as it makes me appreciate the art and craft of pipe making. Excellent job OP.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    hextor

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    wow, that is very interesting, you have talent sir, I admire your work, where did you get the tools and how long you have been practicing in making pipes.

    Posted 2 years ago #
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    Anonymous

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    I can't believe I missed out on that thread! Clickkick, the amount of time required to post all this is beyond generous. This is pure selflessness on your part. Not only are you taking the time to show how challenging pipe making can be, but you are allowing all the potential crafters out there to benefit from crucial, ste-by-step information that will save them time, effort and money.
    I lift my hat to you, sir!

    Posted 2 years ago #
  65. tslex

    tslex

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    I somehow missed this thread when it first appeared. Three things, Adam:

    1. I see something like this and I cannot imagine why every handmade pipe doesn't cost $2,000. The amount of skill, effort and risk involved is stupefying.

    2. Thank you for the huge effort involved in producing this thread with these pictures and descriptions. A real service to this group and a great guide for anyone inclined to try his hand at this craft.

    3. I love your shop. I like the various dust management systems, including the PVC pipe catchment you made.

    OKAY, 4 things: PM sent. I think I know where my wife is going to have to buy my Christmas pipe.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  66. hmhaines

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    This is remarkable, I'm amazed by the work. Thank you so much for sharing!

    "Following the path of least resistance is what makes the river crooked."
    U. Utah Phillips
    Posted 2 years ago #
  67. clickklick

    clickklick

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    how long you have been practicing in making pipe

    I made my first pipe in May of 2015. I've accumulated the tools in steps since then. Lots of trial and error, and a lot of research.

    Posted 2 years ago #

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