How I Make A Carmette Pipe (Pic Heavy)

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clickklick

Preferred Member
May 5, 2014
1,677
1
I am learning as I go and am investing in proper tooling (just got a lathe recently). I thank everyone for the support thus far. I still have a very long way to go, but thought this may be a worthwhile thread to start to show the progress of pipemaking as I go. It is quite a bit extra work as I don't have an easy smartphone to simply click and upload with. My hopes is that at least a few of you enjoy it. This is my method, other maker's methods may differ. I am self-taught up to this point via researching on the internet and input from various people/sources.
With that, lets begin. Not shown are block selection, shape drawing and line drawing on the block, and cutting the lined shape on the bandsaw. Lets bring on the pics so far!
For ease of picture following, We'll call the first picture Step 1 and go onward from there.
Step 1: The Stummel needs to be mounted in the chuck according to the center lines that have been drawn on the block. I use a live center on the lathe (the pointy round thing) to help line it up.


Step 2: Once I am happy with the mortise line up, I start the mortise hole with a center bit. This allows the other drilling processes to remain centered without much wobble or devation. (If you don't do this step, the bit tends to wander and the hole never drills to center.


Step 3: I then drill the mortise with a 5/16" drill bit to the intended depth. You only want to go deep enough for the tenon to be secured, while keeping the draft hole line close to the center intercept junction at the base of the mortise. (if the draft hole is not centered in the mortise base, passing a cleaner will be impossible)


Step 4: I then countersink the entrance of the mortise hole. This provides a nice smooth centering action for insertion of the stem's tenon.


Step 5: Before I move the stummel from this position, I turn the shank and face it. If this happens to be a curved or asymmetrical shank, this step would be done by hand. For this shape however, it is straight and symmetrical, so I can get it started on the lathe.


Step 6: The stummel is then adjusted and recentered to hit the correct angle of the draft hole. I use a 5/32" drill bit to drill the draft hole. It is paramount that this does not drill off center or go too deep, as the tobacco chamber must line up with this step.


Step 7: I then unmount the stummel from the chuck and remount it. This involves recentering everything for the tobacco chamber, again, using the live center as a reference point.


Step 8: Just like with the mortise, I start the tobacco chamber hole with a center bit to ensure the rest of the drilling process goes as planned.


Step 9: I then start drilling the chamber. Here I am using a nice english bit I bought from Ken Lamb in Chicago. This is a 7/8 bit and drills a nice smooth chamber, although this particular pipe requires a 1" chamber, so I will hit it with a spade bit in the next step to finish. If this were simply a 7/8" hole, i'd just be using this bit. (Drilling the entire chamber with a spade bit can be a very loud and chattery process, so I prefer to drill it with an english bit most of the way first.) I have to make sure not to go too deep and overdrill the chamber.


Step 10: I am now finishing up the tobacco chamber with a 1" spade bit that has been ground into a U shape. Depth on this step is paramount and a few passes have to be made in order to ensure that the draft hole enters the chamber as close to the bottom as possible. I am still working on my technique for this, but have been learning very quickly and should have it down in a few more pipes.


Step 11: After the chamber is drilled, I face the rim of the pipe. Since this shape is round, I am also grooving a rim edge in the top to help with keeping symmetry during hand shaping. This concludes the stummel's time on the lathe.


Step 12: As soon as it is off the lathe, it is time to start rough shaping on the 5" sanding wheel. I use 50-80 grit for this step depending on what I have on hand. Here I use a foam backed disc.


Step 13: There is a lot of shaping to be done on the disc, making some progress slowly.


Step 14: Finally I am satisfied with the rough shaping and the time on the coarse grit disc is over. Now it is time to start work on the stem.


......... TO BE CONTINUED .......

 

jmatt

Preferred Member
Aug 25, 2014
760
0
I'm already impressed!!! Very nice job on the pipe, and on this "How it's done" thread. Thanks!!

 

clickklick

Preferred Member
May 5, 2014
1,677
1
Alright, got a little shop time tonight after the kiddos went to bed. Started some work on the stem. Here we go!
Step 15: Cut the rod stock to desired length on the bandsaw. This is where the smell of rotten eggs or wet farts begins! I am using a very fat piece of German Cumberland.


Step 16: I stick the rod in my lathe chuck, face the end, and then lightly touch it with the centering bit.


Step 17: I then use a 1/16" drill bit to drill a pilot hole into the slot end. Gotta give thanks to Sasquatch for this little tip.


Step 18: Now I flip the rod stock over and rechuck it. I then face the end, this will be the tenon side.


Step 19: I center drill the tenon end to prepare for drilling the air hole.


Step 20: I used a 5/32" tapered drill bit to slowly drill the air hole. You have to make small passes and clear chips and do this slowly. You don't want to burn the rod and you don't want the chips creating any ridges or waves in the hole.


Step 21: I then mark the depth of the tenon with my calipers. This line helps guide my cuts.


Step 22: First pass is made as a start of the tenon cutting.


Step 23: After multiple cuts, the tenon is finally finished.


Step 24: I file the tenon edge to make it round, this helps when inserting it into the mortise, along with the mortise taper.


Step 25: I then test fit the stummel. I am checking for snugness of the tenon in the mortise as well as depth of the tenon in the mortise. I am also measuring how much more material I need to take off of the rod to match the stummel shank diameter.


Step 26: I remove the stummel and start taking a small amount of material of the rod diameter to match the current stummel shank diameter.


Step 27: I flip the rod and remove material from the rest.


Step 28: I test fit it to the stummel again, this time paying attention to the rod to shank diameter.


Step 29: I remove it from the stummel and use a dremel tool to cut the beginning of the slot.


Step 30: The results look like this.


Step 31: I use a Kemper Pottery Saw to start cutting the funnel/v shape in the slot. Some use a modifed scroll saw blade, but I picked this technique up from Walt Cannoy (thanks Walt!) It works well for me, but I find I either bend a lot or break alot of these, especially when using them on acrylic rod.


Step 32: Half the funnel is made, very rough at this point.


Step 33: The rest of the funnel is then rough cut.


Step 34: I then use a needle file to clean the slot and further the funneling. Thanks to David McCarter for turning me onto this file! It is an awesome tool to have!


Step 35: Cleaned up slot, for now, still needs refinement, which will come later.


Not really a step, but I wet the block and check progress. This one has promise to remain smooth, but only final sanding will tell. Still a ways to go until then. This is all for now.




TO BE CONTINUED......

 

tbradsim1

Preferred Member
Jan 14, 2012
7,465
81
Very informative, you are to be commended for showing people who have never been around a lathe the steps. :clap:

 

agnosticpipe

Preferred Member
Nov 3, 2013
2,602
29
Great show and tell! I love that you were thoughtful enough to share this process. I have never been tempted to make pipes, just restoring them is all I'm up for, but clearly there is a lot of work to the making of a pipe. Thank you! :clap:

 

derfatdutchman

Preferred Member
Jun 4, 2014
1,135
0
Great post! The machinist in me loves to see how other people make things. I will be looking forward to th upcoming parts.

 

clickklick

Preferred Member
May 5, 2014
1,677
1
I think this adds to this subject. I just receive the most recent edition of the NASPC Pipe Collector, and my work made the COVER!!!!

 

daveinlax

Preferred Member
May 5, 2009
1,057
5
WISCONSIN
I just receive the most recent edition of the NASPC Pipe Collector, and my work made the COVER!!!!
I just opened my a few minutes to see your work on the cover and featured on the boarder trough out. Lorie and I are trilled and very proud of you!! This is very exciting.

The pictorial walk though is really good. Having hod to personally inspected your shop I found it to be well ventilated, laid out with top notch tools! It's really a good space. 8O

 

jmatt

Preferred Member
Aug 25, 2014
760
0
I think this adds to this subject. I just receive the most recent edition of the NASPC Pipe Collector, and my work made the COVER!!!!
Congrats!!!! Very cool watching this.

 

jerwynn

Preferred Member
Dec 7, 2011
1,035
0
Absolutely and truly

Thanks for sharing! Looking forward to more to come!!

 

clickklick

Preferred Member
May 5, 2014
1,677
1
I just realized I should have finished the pipe completely, and then put all the pictures up. Now that I've started posting as I go, if I bung this thing up, you all are going to be disappointed. Sometimes I think I have great ideas only to have the flaw in my plans realized shortly after lol!

 

clickklick

Preferred Member
May 5, 2014
1,677
1
Can anybody guess, without looking at the first set of pictures, what shape I'm aiming for with the progress pics?
If so, I guess I'm doing it right!