Why Are Freehand Stems Partially Inserted?

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rdavid

Preferred Member
Jun 30, 2018
654
3
Milton, FL
Interesting. I've always wondered the same thing.
Maybe a pipe maker will show up and answer the question. Just seems odd they would have the stem pulled partially out.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
19,631
4,416
Outer Space
Maybe the pipemaker anticipates the pipe to be a wet smoker, and the extra bit of tapered stem will ensure that the stem will fit when it swells??? just a guess.

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
18,668
7,200
Emberland
That is an interesting thought. I've also read that some smokers with slightly pull out the stem to prevent moisture build up. Not sure I buy into that one.

 

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fluffie666

Senior Member
Apr 4, 2014
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So push in only with no turning?
I would just seat it in without to much pressure as I would any other pipe I had. Turn it if you feel you need to without excessive pressure.

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
18,668
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Emberland
That volcano actually appears on Prebens pipedia page. I have a famous pipe! :mrgreen: Damnit, now I probably can't smoke it. 8O

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
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Emberland
I would just seat it in without to much pressure as I would any other pipe I had. Turn it if you feel you need to without excessive pressure.
Will do.
I have a Nording billiard with the same thing.

Michael no matter what, the stem won't go inside.
Might just be a Preben quirk.

 

pappymac

Preferred Member
Feb 26, 2015
1,880
84
I have two Ben Wade's, a Preben Holm and a Soren freehand. Admittedly I've bought all at junktique shops but all of them have the stems that are fully inserted.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
28,078
4,871
I just think of the difference between these stems that are only fitted to the hole in the shank and stems, artisan or factory made, that are carefully formed to fit the shank exactly, and I can only think this is a decision to cut the time to make the pipe and the cost to the maker. I see that some of the great freehand craftsmen did this, so I respect it as a design decision, but once they did that, why should anyone else take the time to do it the traditional carefully fitted way. I do note that whoever made my freehands did (seemingly) a better job than that.

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
10,442
3,074
On the few of these that I still have, I just twist them in until seated. With one of the Ben Wades, seated still leaves a section of straight tenon showing, which I just assumed was intentional. Some of these freehands feature a very raked plateau facing at the shank to stem join and were clearly never intended for a flush fit.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
28,078
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I still really like the several freehands I have, one with plateau both rim and shank by Johs, a sturdy signature version by Nording, and a no-name Thompson Cigar house pipe stamped West Germany, and one or two others. They do have a certain style and historical flourish.

 

bnichols23

Preferred Member
Mar 13, 2018
3,032
868
SC Piedmont
just looks too fragile to meand I find them unappealing to look at, which is unfortunate because they are on otherwise beautiful pipes. I can't bring myself to buy them.
Well can *I* have 'em?!?!? :)
TM mantra -- "Holm, Holm, Holm......"

 

bnichols23

Preferred Member
Mar 13, 2018
3,032
868
SC Piedmont
I have a Nording billiard with the same thing.

Michael no matter what, the stem won't go inside.
Well, of COURSE not, Javan! Didn't you know those things were designed to be smoked in the rain??? }:)
Bill
 

dcon

Preferred Member
Mar 16, 2019
1,012
1,730
Jacksonville, FL
I have a couple of Prebens and a Ben Wade. I do as Sable. I never had a desire to push them farther than they seat. I presumed it was always by design which, in fact, I like.

 

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