School me on Smooth Sandblasted Rustication

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Briar Lee

Lifer
Sep 4, 2021
4,840
13,956
Humansville Missouri
There are three main types of finishes on my briars, smooth, carved , and sandblasted. The smooth ones can be highly polished or matte, the carved ones can be worked with cutting tools with lines, gouches, cuts, or finely tooled until they appear nearly sandblasted, usually called rusticated, The sandblasted ones show variations from deep to lightly blasted, I have a few with blasted panels.

But then there’s this Lorenzo.

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It’s an extra large Pot that appears at arm’s length to have been rusticated by carving, but on closer examination it’ was sandblasted and then polished , and stained with Lorenzo’s orange stain and some almost black stain.

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There’s texture to the blasted areas but they’ve more or less been smoothly polished.

I think it’s quite attractive and it’s certainly different.

How Dey Do Dat?

And who started that?
 
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sasquatch

Lifer
Jul 16, 2012
1,697
2,937
That's been sandblasted and stained, then the high spots knocked off with either sandpaper or simply a buffing wheel, leaving a contrast color and texture behind.
 

Briar Lee

Lifer
Sep 4, 2021
4,840
13,956
Humansville Missouri
I have several other Lorenzo pipes and all have an orange stain that absolutely doesn’t rub off, and they tend to be larger pipes. The Tigre is made in Italy presumably by Lorenzo, when he was in charge.

What’s so unusual about this one is I can see the texture, but i can‘t feel much, if any roughness on the rusticated parts.

After a deep blast, Lorenzo had to polish the stummel smooth and then stain the blasted parts a dark black with the smooth parts stained orange.

Was Lorenzo the only maker to do that?

It looks hand rusticated, sort of like a Custombilt, until you get close.

He might have blasted it all and stained it all black, then polished it until the black parts were a whisker deep below the polished parts and stained the polished parts his trademark orange.

I can’t say I’ve ever seen another like it. Lorenzo was not a high dollar pipe brand, and this had to be mostly machine made. There are a lot more of these out there, made on the same line.
 
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Briar Lee

Lifer
Sep 4, 2021
4,840
13,956
Humansville Missouri
Someone looked at the pipe, and couldn't make up his or her mind as to how to finish it.

It was a way, using first a sand blaster and then a buffing wheel, and two colors of stain, to make a pipe you can sit on a stump and admire the grain and forget to smoke it.:)

Lorenzo didn’t need skilled hand carvers to obtain that dramatic hand rusticated look.

Overall it’s a smooth polished and stained pipe, with wild black graining.

It was well named the Tiger.:)
 

alaskanpiper

Enabler in Chief
May 23, 2019
9,382
42,810
Alaska
He might have blasted it all and stained it all black, then polished it until the black parts were a whisker deep below the polished parts and stained the polished parts his trademark orange.
It’s this one, but not exactly in that order. The lighter stain is under the darker stain, both done after blasting, then on the higher parts of the texture, the black stain is sanded off, revealing the lighter stain which is then polished. It’s not terribly uncommon, and can be seen on everything from old GBD Granitans to newer artisan pipes like Scottie Piersel’s relief grain finishes.

IMG_9857.jpegIMG_9855.jpeg
 

Briar Lee

Lifer
Sep 4, 2021
4,840
13,956
Humansville Missouri
It’s this one, but not exactly in that order. The lighter stain is under the darker stain, both done after blasting, then on the higher parts of the texture, the black stain is sanded off, revealing the lighter stain which is then polished. It’s not terribly uncommon, and can be seen on everything from old GBD Granitans to newer artisan pipes like Scottie Piersel’s relief grain finishes.

View attachment 278541View attachment 278542


Thanks for that information.

Lorenzo would have had the production pipe GBD Granitan to guide him.

 
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huntertrw

Lifer
Jul 23, 2014
5,338
5,758
The Lower Forty of Hill Country
Briar Lee:

If I recall correctly from my tenure in metal fabrication, sandblast media is available in different shapes, sizes, and hardnesses. If, indeed, this is a blasted finish, then perhaps the artisan used a larger media with appropriate hardness, in combination with a deft hand on the trigger and careful attention to the blast-pressure, in order to produce this unique pattern.

Whatever the case may be, I like it!
 
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Briar Lee

Lifer
Sep 4, 2021
4,840
13,956
Humansville Missouri
Briar Lee:

If I recall correctly from my tenure in metal fabrication, sandblast media is available in different shapes, sizes, and hardnesses. If, indeed, this is a blasted finish, then perhaps the artisan used a larger media with appropriate hardness, in combination with a deft hand on the trigger and careful attention to the blast-pressure, in order to produce this unique pattern.

Whatever the case may be, I like it!

Looking close at this, it’s a polished smooth pipe with grain enhanced by blast and stain.

Plus it’s a factory pipe where they had to make a whole bunch of them. No extremely skilled artisans were involved. Machines and jigs were used to a great extent.

When they finished , you see the “Tiger stripes” just a thousandth of an inch or so below the polished surface.

These had to sell for more than a standard Lorenzo, but not so much they were priced out of reach of seventies university professors.:)