PMon Tore Me Up

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drwatson

Preferred Member
Aug 3, 2010
1,721
1
toledo
Strangely bleach is the only thing I ever use for Poison Ivy. Old backwood trick and couple days and is gone!

 

weezell

Preferred Member
Oct 12, 2011
11,354
15,155
I'm trying to pretend that I didn't read you poured bleach over your open wound.
Better that than gunpowder and a match to seal er up 8O ...

 

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mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
31,530
16,866
Used to have a cat we took to the vet to have her nails trimmed, and you could hear her screaming outside

the building, and it took two or three people, and her face looked like the devil himself. Then one quiet

Saturday morning, this woman vet tech with multiple piercings in her ears met us, and took the cat in hand,

sat down in the waiting room, and clipped the cats claws with no complaints. I was dumfounded. I said,

"No one has ever done that before. That is a gift." And she said, "I know." She was primarily a horse person,

and she had the mental side of animals, and probably the chemical side of her own emotions, down to where

it changed animal behavior overtly. She soon went off to vet school.

 

simnettpratt

Preferred Member
Nov 21, 2011
1,516
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Bradley, my sister is an RN nurse/missionary. She did time in Haiti and was matron of the Masanga Leprosy Hospital in Sierra Leone (brought back a dog and a boy). She's used to expedient medicines.
I asked her why Clorox was bad and she says the bleach burn may be worse than the original injury. She says you can dilute it enough where it won't burn you, but still kill the bugs.
She says the ratio is five DROPS in a large glass of water: kills the bugs, no bleach burn.
PS The dog was a Basenji, lazy as shit but cool as hell, called Momo after the local chieftain - they don't bark. She let him sleep IN the bed so he wouldn't get eaten, and that was his favorite place. He'd come stand next to the bed and stare at you until you woke up, not sure how he did that. Then he'd always wait to be invited on the bed, she didn't teach him that. Within a minute or so, he'd be wriggling under the covers, and you didn't stand a chance.

 

tbradsim1

Preferred Member
Jan 14, 2012
8,029
2,945
Southwest Louisiana
Sim I had a big plastic cup, put about 10% Clorox and 90% water, mixed it and after washing with liquid soap trickled Clorox over it, it still burned diluted.

 

simnettpratt

Preferred Member
Nov 21, 2011
1,516
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Cool. Didn't think that one through before asking my sister why Clorox would be bad :)
Not even drunk.

 

plateauguy

Preferred Member
Mar 19, 2013
2,413
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Glad to hear you took care of it, Bradley. Clorox and iodine were the only things used when I was a kid. I assume that Pmon's check up when ok.
Rob

 

bentmike

Preferred Member
Jan 25, 2012
2,422
4
Get well soon cajun. Yeah maybe a sedative before the next vet trip might be a good idea.

 

sothron

Preferred Member
Sep 20, 2011
3,951
1,956
Not directed at the ole Cajun specifically, as I'm sure he knows how to handle dogs... But more of a general comment from a guy who raises big dogs (GSDs, Pyrenees, and Anatolian Sheps): be careful in how you raise big, strong dogs. Dog language is much more physical than human language and, without a very clear direction as to who is in charge, big strong dogs may pose you a variety of risks and liabilities down the road. Don't be afraid to put those dogs in line. They need and desire that type of direction. Aggression towards it's person, let alone a bite, is unacceptable under any circumstances and, if dealt with properly, will never occur again. The dog will be happier and more comfortable for the correction and understand it's place in the grand scheme of things (which is what a dog is hard-wired to crave). I've had to put a big dog down who was raised improperly by an irresponsible former owner, and it's a sad thing. But not nearly as sad as mauled child or bitten friend.
Dogs are an emotional issue, so hopefully this post is taken in the spirit of friendliness with which it was intended.

 

tbradsim1

Preferred Member
Jan 14, 2012
8,029
2,945
Southwest Louisiana
Per I am not unopen to advice. PMon only listens to me, I am the dominant one in our relationship, that being said I was the dumbass letting him go in without me. He scratched me, no bite and poor mutt was bewildered I felt so sorry for him. That being said I am strict with him when he screws up, but no abuse, saw my grandfather pull a man off his horse that he was abuseing, slapped him silly. If you want an animal you gotta care for it. I am open to any advice from you. Thanks in advance.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
31,530
16,866
Yes, it's a good idea to go in to a procedure with your four-legged friends. Even just looking them in the eyes and talking

to them goes a long way. If they see you're calm, that steadies them a lot. PMon's a great guy, friend for life.

 

maxpeters

Senior Member
Jan 4, 2010
435
2
Glad you survived the vet visit.

Story of my own. Back in June I took my dog "Dutch" in to get his shots updated. That went alright, but I then asked if they could trim his nails, as I had tried that morning and he wouldn't be still enough.

He's a med. sized dog, maybe 60 lbs. Part pit and part pointer. Usually a real sweetheart. Two vet assistants took him back to the vet in the back for the trim. About 2 min. later I heard Dutch scream and howl and then growl, then scream again and then a long moan. Then yelling and more howls and thumping. I went back to see what was happening and all three had Dutch down on the floor and trying to hang on. I yelled "what the hell are you doing"! The vet said trying to hold him down, They hadn't even started to trim his nails! I said to just forget it. They seemed very appreciative. The vet said that he hated to medicate a dog just to trim his nails, but he might have to if I ever want it done.

Dutch was ok. Just scared. The vet and his assistants looked like they wanted to be somewhere else. Dutch couldn't wait to get out of there. He's usually ok for most things. Just hates having people hold him down. I got him from a rescue center, so who knows what he may have gone through before.

On another note, my grandfather used Turpentine for all sorts of cuts and scrapes. He said it was the best medicine he had during the depression.

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
11,349
6,826
Hi Bradley,
Sorry to read about your ruckus with Pmon. Glad to hear that you're both one the mend.

 

sothron

Preferred Member
Sep 20, 2011
3,951
1,956
Ole Cajun- I misunderstood. A scratch is a very different behavior than a bite, and reflects a different intention. I agree wholeheartedly about abuse. Big difference between discipline and abuse. Just as with children. However, dogs speak a physical language and need contact to understand. Not abuse or violence, mind you, just contact (as opposed to no-contact). As with horses, we put ourselves and those around us in danger if our dogs don't understand their boundaries and expectations. But as with children, horses, or big dogs, we have an enormous obligation to understand the stark differences between contact and abuse/anger/violence.
Anyway, glad everyone's ok.

 
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