Pipe Mud question

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TheCROW

Lurker
Feb 11, 2020
24
54
Hey All,
I recently bought a Brebbia bent Tundra pipe that I like a lot.
I've smoked it two times and noticed that the pipe goes out well before the bottom of the bowl and cannot be relit. And some tobacco gets into the filter area.
Upon inspection I noticed that the draft hole is a bit high and not flush with the bottom of the bowl.
So I think I'm gonna use some pipe mud to heighten the bottom of the bowl.
The bowl is coated, so my question is do I have to clean it before using pipe mud? and after that, do I have to coat it again after the mud dries?
Thank you kindly in advance.
 

MacMarty89

Starting to Get Obsessed
Dec 8, 2021
266
1,810
33
NB, Netherlands
Pipe mud works wonderfully well. I have always used it in my MM cobs. As a matter of fact, I did some DIY on my recently purchased MM Legend Rob Roy. It should harden out for a couple of days before I can smoke it.

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MilesDavis

Starting to Get Obsessed
Jun 16, 2022
162
366
The combination of honey and charcoal (from dietary capsules) works well as a coating. I haven't used it in place of pipe mud, however.
 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
36,448
74,545
Chasing Embers recently mentioned it. it was plain yoghurt and charcoal powder. I don't think ash would work as well.
I use that for a chamber coating in the pipes I make. For repairs I'd use fireplace mortar and in the case of a draft hole above the chamber floor, I'd leave it alone. Some carvers, especially Danish ones, do this to create a moisture trap to prevent gurgling.
 
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Chaukisch

Starting to Get Obsessed
Aug 31, 2021
162
1,097
33
Northern Germany
I use that for a chamber coating in the pipes I make. For repairs I'd use fireplace mortar
Oh, just for chamber coatings. Thanks for the clarification.
and in the case of a draft hole above the chamber floor, I'd leave it alone. Some carvers, especially Danish ones, do this to create a moisture trap to prevent gurgling.
That shines a new light on it, I always thought of it as a flaw and that it's shabby drilling. Shows what I know,
I actually didn't buy a nice looking pipe just because of that. Another good lesson well learned.