Offensively High Resale Prices On Unicorn Blends

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woodsroad

Lifer
Oct 10, 2013
11,952
16,902
SE PA USA
Exactly. In that sense it is something of a criminal enterprise. We don't view it as such because the scale is so small. But really, how is it any different to the mafia smuggling cigs across states to avoid tax?
If that is true, then selling an old shovel to a neighbor makes criminals out of both of you: failure to collect sales tax/VAT and failure to pay use tax.
 

sablebrush52

The Bard Of Barlings
Jun 15, 2013
19,898
45,790
Southern Oregon
jrs457.wixsite.com
A potential buyer might consider those exorbitant prices to be something of a "finder's fee" for their unwillingness to simply pick up a telephone or visit a nearby brick and mortar shop. It's easy to think of something as being rare if you're not putting in any effort to search for it.
Careful now, don't you be calling them lazy people lazy. You'll set off the hive.
 
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anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
15,942
29,876
45
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
People say it's capitalism but it's not. It's human nature. Capitalism encourages these things directly. But the hard to get and rare things are always going to be sold for a premium or sold out really quickly creating even more scarcity (black markets in strict communist countries are pretty robust things, hell the Stasi wore American blue jeans ). It's human nature. I mean there has to be a demand too. Of course like everything we could go deeper. But to complain about it, is to complain about human nature. Which is a fair thing to complain about.
Though I often think there are deeper implications on these types of things. Years ago I hated art and music collectors who buy things as an investment and don't really care about art and music. I found out first hand that those people feed artists and while it would be more ideal and perfect if everyone buying art/music did so because they love it, a lot of the stuff I like wouldn't survive if that was the case. That lady that bought my several of my paintings because she thought I might be famous enough to return on her investment (key word maybe) and if she bought enough art from people at the beginning of their career her grandkids would have one or two paintings that would make up for the thousands spent on starving artists. Yeah they're vultures but at least in that case the vultures are a vital part of the ecosystem. I found out most of the music I love the most released special additions with limited numbered copies sold at a premium, because the fans themselves don't exist in numbers to keep these artists floating. I don't know if this applies here, but I do know that people buying cellars that will out live them seems excessive and greedy too, but guess what I think if most people only bought what they could smoke we'd not have access to the variety of tobaccos we do and it would not be worth it for companies to make gambles on more experimental blends featuring rare components. We don't have to like it or even understand it but the scoop of the picture is bigger then our own personal experiences or visions encapsulates. This vultures might be the reason Germains still gets made, maybe not but they do ironically offer a greater security in producing small scale blends in a frankly pretty tiny market.
 
Dec 10, 2013
2,435
3,078
Nijmegen, the Netherlands
Considering the fact that a good draft 25 cl . beer costs about 6,00 this end of world and only gives 30 minutes of moderate happiness I believe 90 minutes of blissed smoking ( aprox. 4 grams ) for 10,00 is not that bad.
Are you now suggesting I should sell my 100 gram tall boy last indoor production 1981 Duhnill tins for less than 250,00 ?
Oh, come on rotf
 
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telescopes

Pipe Dreamer and Star Gazer
I agree with everything you just stated @anotherbob: When it comes to artwork, I found a genre that I enjoy and I have several paintings each from several artists, now dead, whose art work is still affordable but is slowly being "rediscovered".

For me, since I can't purchase a Monet or a Van Gogh, I have found that I can in fact purchase paintings of high quality that seem to have that certain "something" but at an affordable price.

Not everyone who slabs a canvas with paint demonstrates that quality, but just like seeing a Van Gogh up close - you know it when you see it.

I obviously won't name the artists whom I am interested in because there are several works I am still interested in obtaining and I just haven't gotten to the point to make an offer on those works.

Find a theme or genre that resonates with you. Research the artists who painted in that genre and after awhile, you will see certain names repeat over and over, Then, start examine their works as well as the ones that are up for sale.

I predict you will find yourself a happy person and someone who has a well decorated home.

You may not have propped them up while the artists were living, but you will ensure that their contributions are not forgotten.

Investment is secondary, but with luck, you might see some increased value as well.
 
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EvertonFC

Starting to Get Obsessed
May 5, 2020
253
482
Philadelphia
But there are things that are exclusive to the well to do. A good bottle of scotch will be appreciated by those who are collectors of that sort. The average man hasn't had the experience of having the best.
That's true. And if this was a yacht forum, I'd completely agree. However, we're not talking about things priced only for the well to do. We're talking about things priced for wider consumption, whose prices have been driven through the roof due to the *perception* of value. I know a lot of hardcore bourbon guys. None own a bottle of Pappy 15 or higher. I know another handful of people, who do own Pappy 15, 20, 23. None of whom could tell the difference between Pappy 23 and Woodford Double Oaked.
 

EvertonFC

Starting to Get Obsessed
May 5, 2020
253
482
Philadelphia
While I have founbd the Cuban cigars that I've tried to be rather incredible, I agree with you on bourbons. Being in a bourbon club, I've tried many different ones, and the more expensive they are, the more they strip my throat bare with heavy fusel tastes.

Most who buy Esotericas would scoff at someone smoking aromatics, but them smoke Esotericas where the main flavor is a casing. I just don't understand that.
Exactly. People allow perception to dictate their experiences.
 

telescopes

Pipe Dreamer and Star Gazer
That's true. And if this was a yacht forum, I'd completely agree. However, we're not talking about things priced only for the well to do. We're talking about things priced for wider consumption, whose prices have been driven through the roof due to the *perception* of value. I know a lot of hardcore bourbon guys. None own a bottle of Pappy 15 or higher. I know another handful of people, who do own Pappy 15, 20, 23. None of whom could tell the difference between Pappy 23 and Woodford Double Oaked.
In the blind Tequila taste testings that I did back in the early 2000s, Sauza Hornitos would more often than not trump and trounce the much more expensive blends. The "I know my tequila" guys always looked like a deer in the headlights when the results were revealed.
 
If that is true, then selling an old shovel to a neighbor makes criminals out of both of you: failure to collect sales tax/VAT and failure to pay use tax.
Shovels do not have a specific tax and licensing associated with them. But, to sell a few tins is one thing, similar to selling a shovel. But, if someone sells enough tins or bags of tobacco to be well over $600 bucks, then they are breaking the law as if someone was buying liquor at the liquor store and selling it to people in their front yard.
The same for someone who sells 500 shovels a week. Big difference from just selling to upgrade your lawn implements, or selling a tin or two because you no longer like it.

Whether someone agrees with the law or not, it's still a law. That's why I would never sell any of the tobacco I grew or the wine I made without having all of my ducks aligned with the law.
 

EvertonFC

Starting to Get Obsessed
May 5, 2020
253
482
Philadelphia
In the blind Tequila taste testings that I did back in the early 2000s, Sauza Hornitos would more often than not trump and trounce the much more expensive blends. The "I know my tequila" guys always looked like a deer in the headlights when the results were revealed.
Yep. It's a good way to learn what you truly like. I do a monthly blind over zoom with a group of friends. It's always fun to see what you like when you have no preconceived notions.
 

anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
15,942
29,876
45
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
It's not or we'd all be doing it. Many here have often gifted McClelland and Esoterica tobacco. It's more greed feeding jealousy.
Human nature doesn't always apply to everyone. But if it's something that if you have enough humans and it's suddenly a thing that's going to happen no matter the situation then it's a part of human nature. Human nature is social but we have hermits. And always have and always will. So human nature is highly social but part of human nature is that we do have hermits. Hope that makes more sense.
 
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anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
15,942
29,876
45
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
I agree with everything you just stated @anotherbob: When it comes to artwork, I found a genre that I enjoy and I have several paintings each from several artists, now dead, whose art work is still affordable but is slowly being "rediscovered".

For me, since I can't purchase a Monet or a Van Gogh, I have found that I can in fact purchase paintings of high quality that seem to have that certain "something" but at an affordable price.

Not everyone who slabs a canvas with paint demonstrates that quality, but just like seeing a Van Gogh up close - you know it when you see it.

I obviously won't name the artists whom I am interested in because there are several works I am still interested in obtaining and I just haven't gotten to the point to make an offer on those works.

Find a theme or genre that resonates with you. Research the artists who painted in that genre and after awhile, you will see certain names repeat over and over, Then, start examine their works as well as the ones that are up for sale.

I predict you will find yourself a happy person and someone who has a well decorated home.

You may not have propped them up while the artists were living, but you will ensure that their contributions are not forgotten.

Investment is secondary, but with luck, you might see some increased value as well.
Totally. But the people that only see investment value inject a certain amount of vitality into the market that actually allows for you to have the access you do to artist that are of a lesser commercial value or even less in demand works by well known artists. The other option might be to go back to the patron model. Personally I think both should and can co-exist on a grander level then currently.
 
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WerewolfOfLondon

Can't Leave
Jun 8, 2023
479
1,606
London
If that is true, then selling an old shovel to a neighbor makes criminals out of both of you: failure to collect sales tax/VAT and failure to pay use tax.
It isn't exactly true, I was making a point. The VAT on that stuff is paid by the flipper when they buy it at the first point of contact. It is nevertheless a morally repugnant act given how parasitical it is. But all told, it is true what a lot of people here are saying, just don't buy from the bastards. I have smoked every Germain's blend on the market, and whilst good, they are no way worth it when they are marked up. I won't pay more for them than I do for other baccis, £22 is my limit, and if the tobacconists go one penny over (which they have now started to do), I just won't buy them.
 

anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
15,942
29,876
45
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
In the blind Tequila taste testings that I did back in the early 2000s, Sauza Hornitos would more often than not trump and trounce the much more expensive blends. The "I know my tequila" guys always looked like a deer in the headlights when the results were revealed.
My wine gal Janice. She's cool but she worked for the same restaurant I did. Once explained to all of us that higher priced wines aren't better but are unique enough that the people who they are better for will pay a higher price. In the middle you'll get more widely enjoyable wines (more likely to be what most people will enjoy more) and in very expensive wines you'll get a smaller group of people that really enjoy the heck out of them. Or to put in more simple terms high end is very niche. Middle of the road is higher quality but still populist.
Though the best tequila I ever had turned out to be super expensive and when I looked up the price I felt like a bit of shiphead for drinking half a fifth of it myself. My friend still insist he was happy that people enjoyed it and he also just wanted to know what something that expensive tasted like. The rub is I don't really like tequila that much, I like it but compared to what I do drink I'd rather have Bourbon or Brandy (might be the alliteration of Bobs beloved booze be brandy.)
 
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