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makhorkasmoker

Part of the Furniture Now
Aug 17, 2021
621
1,545
Central Florida
If I grew my own burley, would keeping the tobacco in a hot Florida garage (temps in the mid 90s every day for for months on end), substitute in any way for the kilning? Or do the temps have to be higher and steadier to do any good?
 
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Ahi Ka

Lurker
Feb 25, 2020
6,691
32,040
Aotearoa (New Zealand)
Kilning replicates the natural conditions which occur a few times throughout the year. So essentially if I hung or even left my burley in a jar for a year or two I’d assume that it would be comparable to leaf which has been “finished” in a kiln.

That said, even after a kiln run leaf can benefit from further resting.

The temperature in your garage sounds ideal for curing and ageing leaf, the only issue would be humidity. I’m not sure what that is like where you are. When I hang my leaf to cure, the humidity needs to be averaged over a 3 day cycle of around 60-75rh (I think, sorry brain isn’t working this morning). Any higher and the leaf will mould. Any lower and the curing process won’t occur. The reason the temperature of the kiln is roughly 120-130f is to prevent mould growing on the leaf which is sweating in high humidity
 

makhorkasmoker

Part of the Furniture Now
Aug 17, 2021
621
1,545
Central Florida
Kilning replicates the natural conditions which occur a few times throughout the year. So essentially if I hung or even left my burley in a jar for a year or two I’d assume that it would be comparable to leaf which has been “finished” in a kiln.

That said, even after a kiln run leaf can benefit from further resting.

The temperature in your garage sounds ideal for curing and ageing leaf, the only issue would be humidity. I’m not sure what that is like where you are. When I hang my leaf to cure, the humidity needs to be averaged over a 3 day cycle of around 60-75rh (I think, sorry brain isn’t working this morning). Any higher and the leaf will mould. Any lower and the curing process won’t occur. The reason the temperature of the kiln is roughly 120-130f is to prevent mould growing on the leaf which is sweating in high humidity
Thanks so much. I’m thinking of trying to time it so that the leaves will dry when humidity is relatively low (in the spring) and then they will age in the summer/fall (when both temps and humidity are very high). I’ve tried this with rustica and deers tongue with no mold issues. We will see how burley does. Enjoying this thread!
 
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