My New Savannah Kitten

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phred

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Dec 11, 2012
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Lovely! My wife would dearly love a savannah cat, but we're at capacity anyway, and probably not home enough to properly care for one (one reason why we've gone with cats instead of dogs). Thanks for sharing the photos - we'll just live vicariously. :D

 

jacks6

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May 9, 2016
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Nate, you have impeccable taste in both tobacco and felines. That is one badass cat!

 

iamn8

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Sep 8, 2014
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Moody, AL
She is insanely vocal. Loud ass purr and more loud squeak than meow... and she squeaked ALL f'ing night long. It's "funny" how after a long night without sleep, such a cute kitten loses just a tad of that cuteness. Tivo and I both gave up on sleep at around 3am and shared a look so as to say to each other "that kitten sucked this night". I look forward to being able to let her roam free, perhaps next week if we're lucky. Tivo continues to ever so slowly come around.

Thanks Jack!! It's kinda strange how it seems so many pipe smokers are cat people, more so it seems than the general public.
To anyone giving any serious thought to adopting a Savannah, after a couple days with mine... I haven't really formed an opinion yet except to say that this one is one seriously squeaky purr machine. My master bath, her current room of isolation, is TRASHED. She has gained access to the towel cabinet, dragged towels all over the room, into her litterbox, water, toilet, its as though she made a conscious decision to test the absorbency of all my bath towels. She's knocked everything over that can be. She opened up my clothes drawers and emptied them of their contents. It's as though someone locked a 3 year old in my bathroom for a couple days. I've had kittens most of my life, but never have been witness this type of feline destruction. She is a hardcore one cat wrecking crew. :) the good news, there's nothing left for her to damage and now that I know what to expect, so begins the preparation for the inevitable declaration of war on the rest of my home. I'll be preparing my home for battle as though I'm setting up a daycare for children. Did I mention she has zero fear of water? I fear for my reef aquariums future.

 

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bluegrassbrian

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Aug 27, 2016
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Gorgeous. There was (maybe still is) a breeder in Berea, Ky that I and an ex once visited.

This was about 10 years ago and Servals were still a relatively new phenomenon to American cat fanciers. We got to hang out and play with the adults and a new litter of kittens. They were all very affectionate, friendly and playful.

If I ever have the space for one I'd love to own one.

 

brian64

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Jan 31, 2011
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I feel fortunate to have learned from your experience. I was seriously considering putting a mountain lion in my bathroom, but now I'm reconsidering.

 

iamn8

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Sep 8, 2014
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Moody, AL
You must've misread my post. Putting a mountain lion in your bathroom is a choice I support entirely.

 

mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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Kittens are pretty bad. When my two rescues (look like Maine Coons) were new to me, about a month old, they had no boundaries. They would seemingly bounce off the walls and ceilings for an hour or two, then disappear into the closet and collapse for forty minutes, then re-immerge and repeat the procedure. They loved to dump over the trash and spread it all over the room, mostly looking for snacks. Once they saw they would get fed, they stopped dumping the trash. Things slowly evolved better. But their "teenage" months are pretty rough. They are average sized, so not quite so destructive, but I did have to escape to the yard or a coffee shop just to get my composure and equilibrium because they were so kinetic; it was like being trapped inside a video game. You might want to acclimate your girl to a collar so that people understand she is a companion animal if she's going outdoors. I'd also have her chipped if she isn't already, in case someone wants to adopt her as a supposed stray.
One of the best things my tiger tabby Maine Coon did when he was almost an adult, he took a running start and hit a Christmas gift smoked salmon wrapped in plastic and surfed the length of the room on it, the perfect shape and smooth surface for a surf board.
For anyone thinking about a cat, I would definitely consider an adult cat rescue. You can assess the personality of the animal and you don't have to go through the kittenhood, which is adorable but mighty demanding. I have loved all my felines, but Linwood, adopted as a two or three year old, a big orange tabby, was just a jewel. He was a little like living with the Buddha. No offense meant, but he had immense presence and understanding.

 

cosmicfolklore

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Aug 9, 2013
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Helena, Alabama
When I went off to college, I took my little grey cat out to my granddad's place, because I couldn't keep a cat in the dorms. So, a few years latter when I moved out of the dorms into my own place, I went to get my cat only to find my little female had matted with a Linx that my granddad was feeding and had named Garfield, although he never got close to it or let it in the house. It had taken to lording itself over the yard while relaxing on top of the wellhouse.
My granddad had said that a few of the kittens he had tamed. So, he had one packed into a box for me to take to my new apartment. It was grey with white socks and crazy tufts of hair on top of each ear and sideburn/manes on each side of its head like the linx, really cool looking. I had a 69 Fastback, and I dropped by to pick up my new cat, that I named Bootsy. But, about halfway across the state, the cat had eaten itself out of the box, and was shredding my backseats while making a wild guttural noise. It was a two and a half hour drive, and I was sweating, feeling like if I remained as still as possible, it wouldn't notice me, and eat me. But, the upholstery was ruined, the whole seat was ruined actually.
I got it home, and within a week, it weighed twice as much and a regular house cat. But, no one could pet it but me. But, I had constant slices and scars on my arms and face, just from playing with it, even while wearing welding gloves. But, it would sleep with me, making me terrified that I might move to abruptly in bed and get attacked. Or, it would think that my foot was a rodent under the covers and I would have to get stitches.

Then one day, it just disappeared, along with a whole pane of glass from a window.
From then on, I sort of lost my interest in big cats, and I was sort of relieved when it ran away. I did drive around a little making a show of looking for it. But, I am not sure that I really wanted to find it. I keep thinking that someone out there probably tried to pick that cat up, thinking that it was a cute stray cat, and probably ended up in the ER.

 

mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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I didn't realize that small cats were all sub-species that could produce offspring. I wonder if most continue to be fertile; apparently so, since some of the mixes are rated by generation in terms of how much wild cat they retain. I think a wild-domestic mix might be too much for me to handle, as are some pure domestics. I'd steer most people to domestic rescues. I'd encourage them to go now, while there are mostly adult cats needing adoption. Once the kittens arrive at the shelters, people will mostly only adopt them. If you audition adult cats, you will find specific ones that will, in effect, adopt you; they're not subtle, they'll sleep in your lap.
When I adopted an adult, I gave the shelter his name, to register me on his chip information, and when I left with him in a carrier, to my surprise, the whole lobby full of people piped up and said, "Goodbye Linwood, goodbye Linwood..." all the way to the car. Later he wrestled me trying to put him in the carrier to go to the vet, and it was quite a struggle, but to my amazement, he did not extend his claws. I was in awe. Who is this guy? Often, I'd take him to the vet on my shoulder, since he didn't like the carrier (except to come home, of course). Some big old Harley biker liked the picture of me with a large orange cat draped over my shoulder so well he gave me a thumbs up. Linwood like water pretty well, probably because he was mostly Abyssinian. He'd go out and stroll in the rain, not take cover like most cats, and saunter inside, and I'd towel him off.

 

iamn8

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Sep 8, 2014
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Moody, AL
First, let me say that i didn’t enter into this lightly or without great consideration, education, and experience. Savannah cats are a domestic breed and aren’t the slightest bit aggressive. What they have retained from their African bloodline is a wildcat like confidence in themselves and their surroundings, something which has been mostly lost in your average domestic housecat. Yes, There are “confident” house cats, don’t get me wrong, but i assure you, this breed is quite different in this way.

When getting a long term feline companion, you must consider saving a cat from the pound. However, given the status of my life, i very much wanted/needed a cat with the characteristics of the Savannah. I don’t have much of a future ahead of me. Every bit of joy i can squeeze out of my days is seriously valuable. My Ocicat has brought more joy and wonderful companionship than i could ever put into words. A cat which possess those characteristics x10… well lets just say that i look forward to these adventurous years with Lego, something i was lacking when looking forward. The breeder i got her from had a quote on her page which sold me. “Life is too short. Get a Savannah.” I couldn’t agree more. Animal companions are a way of bringing those things to our life which might be lacking. Every breed or mix we might gravitate towards has certain characteristics which draw us in, offer something we can relate to. A childhood memory? a sense of purpose? The personal satisfaction of saving another life? unconditional love or conditional love? Whatever personal experience or desire for… these things attract us to our animal companions. We all have our reasons for entering into these relationships. I’ve already experienced a certain looking down on from those who see getting a “pure bred” cat as somehow cruel and materialistic. This attitude abounds. I won’t give it any further thought. It’s just a stupid way to see the world.
Tivo continues to make headway in accepting Lego, slowly, but surely. I leave the door cracked. Today, tivo stood a couple feet from the door and watched intently as i used a feather toy to get Lego to stick her paw out of the crack. Yesterday Tivo hissed and left the room. I’m quite confident that within a week’ish they’ll be sharing the house barrier free. The worst part, by far, is the constant crying all night. Tivo nor i have slept much the past few days. Needless to say, i can’t wait till she needn’t be confined any longer!!!

Lego is chipped and has a harness, but will NEVER EVER go outside unless on leash. Never, not a chance.
Playing Thru Door

 

mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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Nate, you're the right man for this cat. My coaching toward rescues is more for people who might not be as experienced or not as dedicated in that way. As for pedigree versus rescue, not even a discussion for me. It's the right animal, not the particular ancestry or history. Kittens will drive you crazy-crazy, that's just a given. I think Savannah will settle in. It's funny how they learn and adapt. Inside those minds, they really want to please and fit in, but it takes them time to match up their energies and impulses to the patterns of their "prides," you and Tivo that is. Cats aren't social animals but do have a social component, I think. I'll be interested in any updates you choose to give.
Ref video, what a charmer! I caught myself sort of waving at her.

 

buckaroo

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Sep 30, 2014
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Never heard of these. That adult pic is crazy. Sounds fun. I might have gone with a spider monkey instead though.

 

cosmicfolklore

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Aug 9, 2013
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Helena, Alabama
Speaking of rescues and in the same vein as the rest of this thread. We don't have dog catchers. We have these cages in town where people can put strays or surrender dogs that they no longer want. I have to drive by the cages when I go out the back road off the property. A handful of years ago I drove by the cages to see that someone had stuck a coyote in there, ha ha. I couldn't help but think that someone took it in as a stray and then had to struggle with surrendering it to the pound, but just couldn't get past what a bitey son of bitch that dog was, ha ha.

 

iamn8

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Sep 8, 2014
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Moody, AL
LOL I caught myself doing that also watching the video. I find that people who don't like cats simply don't know them. Being at home with them 24/7 vs being gone 8hrs a day, the relationship is VERY different. When I was working and had cats, they spent lots of time alone and developed accordingly, the same as a person would. Being home all the time allows for a much different relationship. They are very good at fiting into whatever habits/schedules you have. Mine are very affectionate and social. Tivo trusts me completely and that's seriously important. Anytime she's faced with something new, she makes eye contact, waiting to see my response to know if it's safe or not. Cats are FAR more like humans than dogs. To quote an episode of Rules Of Engagment, dogs are the cheap whores of the animal kingdom, giving love freely to anyone who'll have them. Some people need that unconditional love while others would rather have it based on a relationship of trust. I don't mean this in a bad way. Just some want that sort of relationship. These are of course generalizations and not always true, but mostly so.
So far as breeding goes, mixing an Serval with a domestic is exceedingly difficult which is the reason for its rarity. This is why the Bengal breed has been FAR more successful. In the wild, a domestic cat would more likely be eaten than mated with. I've heard many stories of people buying a serval for breeding and having it die of old age before any successful breeding.

 

iamn8

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Sep 8, 2014
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Moody, AL
That's interesting Cos. I've never heard of such a thing. Can't imagine keeping a coyote as a pet. People are weird ;)

 
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