Controlling Temperature for Varying Flavors

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
.
Status
Not open for further replies.

pipesmokingtom

Preferred Member
May 4, 2015
3,210
4
It seems like we always place emphasis on smoking absolutely as cool as possible to coax the best flavor from our blends. I thought we could discuss perhaps the more "advanced" technique that I personally do, which is to try and very the temperature/cadence with which I smoke in order to see what a blend will do.
I haven't seen it discussed much, but I wanted to see what everyone else's take on this is.
Sometimes I'll heat a blend up a bit to see what flavors come out more. Sometimes I'll nearly let a blend go out to see what the flavor is like right at that point before I stoke it back up.
What say you all on consciously manipulating the temperature for varied flavors?

 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
11,929
9,330
SoCal
jrs457.wixsite.com
I curious to know why this is a "more Advanced" technique? I certainly vary my cadence for different results, and vary moisture content for different flavor profiles. I expect that a lot of pipe smokers with any experience to that.
But when I really want to get those sometimes very elusive flavor notes, nothing beats keeping the blends simmering at the verge of going out, while slowly taking in a sip and letting it gently waft out through my schnoz. Hmmm, makes me want to light up a bowl of 10 yo Germain's Brown Flake. Bye!

 

cosmicbobo

Preferred Member
May 11, 2017
657
0
I have not done this yet, but I bought one of those little electric coffee cup warmers with the thought of using it to heat/dry toby that needs airing before smoking. I may employ it on my legendary Tobacco Burger before the moisture oozes out and raises the ocean level.

 

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
.

aldecaker

Preferred Member
Feb 13, 2015
4,407
26
I've never consciously done this, no. But I have noticed, after the fact, that some notably tasty smokes have resulted in more black, charry bits and less white or gray ash. Take that, fine white ashholes!

 

pipesmokingtom

Preferred Member
May 4, 2015
3,210
4
I curious to know why this is a "more Advanced" technique?
I admittedly struggled a bit with how to word that without trying to sound pretentious.
I was mostly trying to reference the fact that the advice is always "the cooler the better" and most newer smokers are satisfied with just not letting the pipe go out.
To really be able to cruise at varying degrees of burning without worrying about having to relight or burn yourself is really all I meant.

 

cosmicbobo

Preferred Member
May 11, 2017
657
0
Tom, you don't have to live with the thing, banging on the walls screaming, "I want the keys to the car!"


 

mawnansmiff

Preferred Member
Oct 14, 2015
5,637
2,022
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
Not something I ever considered but an interesting question. I should imagine that different esters are released depending on how hot the tobacco burns?
Think of onions in a frying pan. Just lightly fried they still taste of onion, though muted. Fry with more heat until almost black and they become very sweet.
I would also say that moisture content comes into the equation too. Too much moisture I would guess means much of the flavours are mixed with steam thereby diluting them.
Regards,
Jay.

 

pipesmokingtom

Preferred Member
May 4, 2015
3,210
4
I find that of a blend contains dark fired Kentucky, that particular flavor doesn't pop as much until I smoke it slightly more aggressively.
I'm not talking about overheating a bowl necessarily, but varying the temp does a lot of interest things for me at least, especially with blends with a lot of components.

 

deathmetal

Preferred Member
Jul 21, 2015
7,715
14
I thought we could discuss perhaps the more "advanced" technique that I personally do, which is to try and very the temperature/cadence with which I smoke in order to see what a blend will do.
My take on this: sometimes it pays to caramelize some tobaccos with the first few puffs after the light.

 

jvnshr

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 4, 2015
4,385
2,495
Baku, Azerbaijan
But when I really want to get those sometimes very elusive flavor notes, nothing beats keeping the blends simmering at the verge of going out, while slowly taking in a sip and letting it gently waft out through my schnoz.
Totally agree with this one, although I don't own a schnoz.

 

crashthegrey

Preferred Member
Dec 18, 2015
2,933
223
37
Cobleskill, NY
www.greywoodie.com
I do the same, and definitely agree that sometimes dark Kentucky benefits from a warmer burn. And I didn't read the post as pretentious at all. Advanced just in that it takes awhile to start playing around with this with purpose.

 
Status
Not open for further replies.

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
.