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WWII and Tobacco Pipe Smoking

(36 posts)
  1. kashmir

    kashmir

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    Tobacco pipe smoking and the Fighting Men of the Second World War. From both the Allied and Axis sides.

    The pipe eases you into the present moment - savor your pipe & you'll savor this moment.
    Posted 5 years ago #
  2. papipeguy

    papipeguy

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    When men were truly men. The guy in the fox hole smoking a pipe while fighting? That is one cool cat.

    Blowin' smoke since 1970.
    Posted 5 years ago #
  3. petes03

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    Makes you wonder what tobaccos they had in their pipes. Great post, thanks Kash!

    Posted 5 years ago #
  4. pylorns

    pylorns

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    Awesome pics!

    Posted 5 years ago #
  5. rockymtnsmoker

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    Great pix! Wonder if we could have gotten the various government representatives together over a few bowls if the whole mess could have been avoided. Sure as hell the grunts on the ground for both sides would rather have been smoking at home on the front porch.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  6. captainsousie

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    Those are some amazing pictures. That they are gathered in one place is even better. Thanks for posting.

    Eagles may soar, but weasels don't get sucked into jet engines.
    Posted 5 years ago #
  7. pipeherman

    pipeherman

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    I love the images of the RAF, they are definitely doing it in style.


    Finnish Resistance during the winter war


    German Soldier talking to a Norwegian Officer


    German Infantryman on the Russian front


    3rd SS Division Totenkopf snipers Russian Front


    7th Armoured Division "Desert Rats" Officer


    Two British soldiers smoking a pipe after what they have seen somewhere in Italy (Concentration Camp).


    Gebirgsjäger enjoying pipes in the Mountains.


    More Gebirgsjäger enjoying pipes (apologies for this ones size)

    Posted 5 years ago #
  8. misterlowercase

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    Nice thread Kashmir, I like how you used Oppenheimer as the final pic there.

    A few to add...


    RAF pilot Douglas Bader, his story is very much worth looking up.


    New Zealand Army sergeant


    Finnish Army General Kurt Martti Wallenius


    Japanese soldier, unknown info?


    In 2008, a complete Sturmgeschütz IV was discovered under the bed of Rgilevka River near Grzegorzewo in west part of Poland. It sunk in the river on 19 or 20th January 1945 while crossing it over the ice. It's in almost perfect condition assuming all those years down there. The turret was taken away almost 2 years before the actual body was taken out.

    While exploring the contents of vehicle, elements of a body of a mechanic/panzerman were found. Human remains were cared for as well as appropriate legal service was called. Large quantities of personal and weapon gear were also found inside.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  9. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

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    Thank you all who submitted pictures it's a mind stimulator at how we are all human. Thanks Kas.

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 5 years ago #
  10. petes03

    petes03

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    I love this thread! I love looking at pics of "The Greatest Generation" and their pipes!

    Posted 5 years ago #
  11. stbruno70

    stbruno70

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    Very evocative photos. Thanks for posting them.

    Mason,Vice President
    Golden Gate Pipe Club
    Posted 5 years ago #
  12. kashmir

    kashmir

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    Yes, thanks gents, for contributing. Outstanding photos, and background captions, as well. This period of history has long held my attention. Pipes and tobacco provided the simple pleasures of home for the men in the field, lending whatever measure of solace to those forced to face the unthinkable.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  13. mso489

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    I had no idea General George (Patton) was a pipe smoker -- be darned. So many of these guys were
    living right on the edge. They needed any cheer they could corner. My dad was a minesweeper skipper
    during World War II, chain smoking a pipe, always Granger as his tobacco. To maintain the family "dynasty,"
    I signed on for a minesweeper, as a lowly radioman not an officer, during the Vietnam War. Wooden ships,
    and men of steel, and all that. A few cigars for me at the time, no pipes; in retrospect, it would have been
    fun to pull out a briar when "the smoking lamp was lit."

    Posted 5 years ago #
  14. mso489

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    Notice the billiard is the hands-down favorite in the photos, mostly straight billiards. A straight
    billiard was always my dad's thing. He didn't rotate. He'd smoke them daily, all day, until the
    pipe split, and then start a new one. They lasted a surprisingly long time, usually more than a
    year. He did quit cold turkey in his sixties, and lived to be 89 licensed to drive without glasses;
    I took him to his final driver's license eye exam, when I was in-town from out-of-state. He was
    up and around and alert until about a month before he died.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  15. kashmir

    kashmir

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    Indeed, a lot of straights. Wonder if any were Dunhills or Comoys. And what they were smoking?

    Posted 5 years ago #
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    plateauguy

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    Outstanding pictures. Thanks, Kash and everyone that contributed!

    Posted 5 years ago #
  17. titus

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    Brilliant pictures. Thanks so much for posting.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  18. crazypipe

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    I like the picture were the man is selling Dunhills

    Posted 5 years ago #
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    rmason

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    Great photos Kashmir, especially the the one of Oppenheimer, that man is one of my biggest influences in life.
    ~Ron

    Ron
    Posted 5 years ago #
  20. martiniman

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    MSO489 - Patton was an avid pipe smoker but mainly briars, the large cobb was a gimmick for the photographers and crowd so they could capture the pipe.

    Thanks to all for the great pictures, keep them coming,
    Cheers,

    Posted 5 years ago #
  21. irish

    Gary

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    Thanks to all who contributed . A special thanks to Kashmir for starting the thread .

    @ martiniman , the picture of Patton he does have a briar . The big cob smoker was MacAuthor .

    Posted 5 years ago #
  22. anthonyrosenthal74

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    Great photos! I love seeing photos and film of this era, as well as movies based upon this time. Currently I've been watching Winds of War on Netflix. It's a pretty descent miniseries with quite a bit of pipe smoking going on.

    Arrrrr, shiver me timbers! International Talk Like a Pirate Day is September the 19th!!!
    Brothers Of The Black Frigate
    Posted 5 years ago #
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    Anonymous

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    MSO 489: To maintain the family "dynasty,"
    I signed on for a minesweeper, as a lowly radioman not an officer, during the Vietnam War...

    I am calling BS on your comment...you played a crucial role in that conflict, in some of the declassified documents I have read from the cold war, communiques played a very vital role, and being that vital cog on a minesweeper, we will never know how many other vessels were saved from catastrophes that were prevented.

    Thank you for your service.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  24. andrew

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    Someone I know who served in the Canadian military no too long ago was saying you can only smoke a pipe or chew because the cigarette cherry's will give your location away.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  25. misterlowercase

    misterlowercase

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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FrHkKXFRbCI#t=162

    :

    Teddy said:
    "I like the picture were the man is selling Dunhills"

    There's a pretty amazing story behind that photograph.

    The man seated is Alfred's son, Alfred Henry, amid the rubble of his shop, selling his wares.
    Talk about British resolve - keeping calm and carrying on was of utmost importance in the midst of such utter disaster,
    the spirit shan't be broken.

    This image shows what Jermyn Street looked like on April 17 1941,
    and Alfred H. kept calm and carried on...

    This page gives a map of exactly where that High Explosive Bomb fell:
    http://dev.bombsight.org/bombs/14244/
    ...the whole site is interesting to go through.

    The following passage is taken from the Balfour book Alfred Dunhill: One Hundred Years And More

    "...after a lull of many weeks German air raids on London were resumed on 19 March 1941, with increased intensity.

    Early in the evening of Wed. 16 April, the bombs began to fall, by 2:30 AM on the morn of 17 April they were falling at roughly 20-second intervals. It was the heaviest raid on London since the war began.

    At about 3 o'clock that morning two land mines, each weighing about a ton and suspended from parachutes of green silk, hit the Alfred Dunhill shop and destroyed most of it. The Jermyn Street shop area was completely destroyed, but part of the old Duke Street premises survived the blast. Most of the stocks and all of the museum were lost, but the shop cat survived.

    In some 3 feet of water and half-darkness, staff members rescued what stocks and mail order records they could. William Phipps, the shop manager, toiled manfully in his smock and bowler hat. Budd the windowdresser arrived just as sparks from a fire raging in the Hammam Baths opposite the Jermyn Street entrance, fell on the shop and started a fire causing further damage. Rescued stocks and records were taken over to the H.L. Savory shop at 178 New Bond Street."

    More info here:
    http://www.westendatwar.org.uk/page_id__236_path__0p28p.aspx

    ____________________________________________

    We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.

    These cruel, wanton, indiscriminate bombings of London are, of course, a part of Hitler’s invasion plans. He hopes, by killing large numbers of civilians, and women and children, that he will terrorise and cow the people of this mighty imperial city ... Little does he know the spirit of the British nation, or the tough fibre of the Londoners.

    We have not journeyed all this way across the centuries, across the oceans, across the mountains, across the prairies, because we are made of sugar candy.

    Upon this battle depends the survival of Christian civilisation. Upon it depends our own British life and the long continuity of our institutions and our Empire. The whole fury and might of the enemy must very soon be turned on us now. Hitler knows that he will have to break us in this island or lose the war. If we can stand up to him, all Europe may be free and the life of the world may move forward into broad, sunlit uplands. But if we fail, then the whole world, including the United States, including all that we have known and cared for, will sink into the abyss of a new Dark Age, made more sinister, and perhaps more protracted, by the lights of perverted science. Let us therefore brace ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still say, 'This was their finest hour.'

    Winston Churchill

    _________________


    Posted 5 years ago #
  26. misterlowercase

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    Arno, on his great blog, also adds to the story,

    "...Alfred Dunhill’s store, and many other in the surrounding area, was bombed and destroyed. A popular tale tells that when that happened, Dunhill employees called Sir Winston Churchill at four o’ clock in the night. This to assure him his private collection of cigars (which were kept in the store’s humidor) had already been relocated to safety. And with that attitude Dunhill continued to sell pipes from the debris and ruins of the store."

    http://dutchpipesmoker.wordpress.com/tag/woii/

    :

    Posted 5 years ago #
  27. arno665

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    Talking about Douglas Bader.. Look at the pipe he smokes in the picture a couple of posts above. I once had an e-mail conversation with a British pipe collector, well, Dunhill collector:

    On a final note - for now anyway - the other attached pics I thought may be of interest to you given your passion for the old and rare...It's of my pride and joy that first began my obsession with Dunhill - an undated patent number Bruyere from 1941 that has had only light smoking and which came in its original box, with purchase receipt, several spare packs of inner tubes (some still sealed), pipe cleaners and an interesting provenance….it was gifted to me and I have therefore no more to go on but the word of the very generous person who gave the pipe to me…but who nevertheless advised me that it was once the property of one rather famous spitfire pilot - Douglas Bader - who bought it in London himself whilst on one of his many trips to the air ministry during the Battle of Britain. Who knows….but it's a great thought to have in your head as you smoke it!!! (Tally Ho…chocks away…)

    And this is that pipe:

    Posted 5 years ago #
  28. jazz

    jazz

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    I have found this to be a truly fascinating thread.

    James

    Posted 5 years ago #
  29. virginiacob

    virginiacob

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    Great pics! Fascinating glimpses into history! I'm sure the pipe offered one of the few simple pleasures that the soldiers on both sides could enjoy despite the sufferings and horrors that they were forced to endure daily throughout the war. The pic of the pipe recovered from the German tank in 2008 is really neat. Amazing how well preserved it was after being submerged for over 50 years!

    Posted 5 years ago #
  30. sfsteves

    sfsteves

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    jazz ... thanks for digging this up ... I somehow missed it when it was current and am glad to have seen it ...

    SteveS
    de gustibus non est disputandum

    "If there is no smoking in Heaven, I shall not go." - Mark Twain
    Posted 5 years ago #
  31. sothron

    Perique

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    Thank God they fought for our freedom to smoke. Oh wait....

    Posted 5 years ago #
  32. aquilas

    aquilas

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    It's amazing the history that pipe smoking has. Thank you for sharing, OP!

    Posted 5 years ago #
  33. titus

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    Fascinating stuff. My Dad tells fond stores about the war years in Britain, he was young, would have been in Junior school and moved away from the city he was living in to live in the country side for safety. His favorite story was the time he was at school, watching dog fights overhead between Spitfires and Me 109's. A 109 was shot down and crashed landed hear his school. A school full of kids went to the crash site and as he puts it "captured" the dazed but uninjured pilot before the police and Army arrived.

    He would often tell stories of the German POW's who would work mending roads, buildings etc. They would carve gifts for the kids from wood, make toys and give them away. They were I'm sure missing their own children so that was important to them. Dad has never spoke unkindly about them, they didn't try to escape, they just wanted to go home when the war was over.

    Posted 5 years ago #
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    Anonymous

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    My grandfather was a Marine in the Pacific theater during WWII and he told me before he landed on Iwo Jima he saved six packs of cigarettes to trade for a pipe and some tobacco. He wanted the pipe because it kept his teeth from chattering on the landing craft. Talk about clenching.

    Our family still has the pipe. I've asked for since I am the only pipe smoker but you all know how family politics work.

    These photos make me want to dig through the photo albums.

    Thanks for reviving the thread.

    Posted 5 years ago #
  35. literaryworkshop

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    I really enjoyed looking through these pictures.

    Not long ago, I visited the USS Alabama, a decommissioned battleship not far away. They had a few officers' rooms on display done up with accurate period artifacts, including several pipes. As above, mostly billiards, but I have no idea who picked them out. Tobacco was available at the ship's store, though I never found out what kinds. I'm guessing it was a pretty limited selection.

    Posted 5 years ago #
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    Anonymous

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    I have a couple Dunhills my Chinese grandfather got secondhand in Shanghai in the 50s. I've dated them to '36 and '38, so they were produced right around this era. To think they were around at the same time the war was starting and see pictures of men who might have smoked pipes coming out of the factory at the same time is just fascinating to me. Thanks all for contributing some really nice photos and a bit of history to go along with them.

    Posted 5 years ago #

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