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Veterans Day

(38 posts)
  1. jvnshr

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    I would like to honor those who not only served the States but their own motherlands including my own grandfather who was a WWII veteran.

    Javan
    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. mackeson

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    Yes. Happy Veterans day to all around the world who heard the call of their nation and willingly put their lives on the line.
    You have our thanks and respect.

    "Once you go down the Lakeland path, forever will it dominate your destiny."
    -Apologies to Master Yoda
    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. cortezattic

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    It's good that we reserve a day to recognize those who put their personal lives on hold to serve and protect our country.

    I find myself sitting idly on the line dividing past and future,
    as if I could kill time without injuring eternity. -- Thoreau
    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. davet

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    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. deathmetal

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IbStQRcH1jo

    "My own experience has been that the tools I need for my trade are paper, tobacco, food, and a little whiskey." -- William Faulkner

    The Metal Mixtures
    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. tbradsim1

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    . Son with 82nd Airborne jumped with Old Timers for 50th Anniversary.

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. mso489

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    Don't forget to fly the flag if that's your tradition. Get it displayed early, but not before dawn. Take it down at sunset, and remember that's earlier now after daylight savings ended some places. I honor my dad, a minesweeper skipper in the Pacific for the USN in World War II, and his brother/my uncle who was a landing craft officer at Tarawa in the first major amphibious battle for the U.S. Also my Uncle Roger who was an engineer in the Army during that war. I was an enlisted radioman on a minesweeper (MSO 489) off the DMZ in Vietnam. My flag flown off the porch is a smaller ship's flag with sewn stripes and stars. My late wife's dad was an Army courier between combat command posts before and during the Battle of the Bulge. My wife's dad was an infantry cook in the trenches during World War I (he was an older dad). He suffered health effects from mustard gas his entire life but did live into his sixties despite that.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. kcghost

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    We should all stand and salute these people.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. paulie66scandinavian

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    Raising my toast to all service member(present and past) of the U.S Army&Navy

    Paul The Scandinavian'
    Posted 1 year ago #
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    aldecaker

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    Happy Veterans' Day to all you former and current service members out there! There are a lot of non-veterans like myself out there who are having a great day because of veterans like you.

    A man who serves his country is a patriot. A man who serves his government is an employee. The two are not always the same thing.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. nevadablue

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    I saluted my son first thing this morning and enjoyed his return salute. He is 100% disabled due to the Iraq war. My lady and I are full time caregivers for him. I am thankful to have him with us, many families don't have their loved ones. I served during the Vietnam era (ended up in Korea of all things) so we are both Army Vets.

    My salute and thanks to all the vets come and gone, and thanks to those of you who recognize the veterans.

    ---
    Ken
    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. mso489

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    nevada', special regards to your son for his continuing valor, and to you and your wife as well. Seen this way, caretaking is religious practice of the highest order. Beyond creed or calling.

    I went to my local grocery store chain (Harris Teeter) and knew from a friend to ask for the veteran's discount and saved $9.52. I think most of that was for my usual loyalty card discount, but some of it was just for Vets Day. The check-out woman said her great uncle was also a Vietnam vet, and I asked her to send him my best wishes, after asking if he is still "with us," which he is.

    The flag is flying on my porch in a puffy breeze on a crisp fall day. Must remember to retire the colors at dusk. Happy Veterans Day to all Forums vets and those with kindred vets. In my family list I regret I omitted my Aunt May who was an Army nurse in the Philippines, such that my dad, a skipper on a minesweeper, was able to go visit her when they were both in P.I. off duty.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. ssjones

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    A special thanks to all the Vets on the forum.

    My mother found this picture of me, my brother and father. This was the day he went to Vietnam in '68.
    He's in a nursing/hospice unit now (98 years old) and this will be his last Veterans Day. Old soldiers go out hard.

    Al

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. mso489

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    ssjones, I'm sorry to hear your dad is in hospice, but glad he has led such a long life, made so worthwhile by his sons and military service, and I'm sure much else. What stories you have to treasure. Ninety-eight years sounds like a full life indeed, unless you are ninety eight; then a few more surely sound good.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. tbradsim1

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    Al, words escape me about your Fathet, what a legacy, American to the core, there's a special place for him in the Army of Angels

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. ssjones

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    I didn't mean to bring everybody down! He's definitely ready to meet his maker. He isn't suffering, but just has no quality of life. He was a good soldier, husband and Dad, but we're ready to let him go to the next life.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. tbradsim1

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    Al his life is a celebration, I understand your feelings.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. ssjones

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    My daughter posted this on Facebook yesterday, from 2016, he was in better shape, also in Vietnam, right after WWII ended.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. nevadablue

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    My salute to your dad Al. Mine went home in '94. My dad was a machinist's mate on a minesweeper in WWII. Can't wait for the reunion.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. mso489

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    Hey nevada, another minesweeper sailor. The saying was, ships of wood, men of steel. Our lives depended on machinist mates. If you didn't have forward motion (good running engines) all you had was a sea anchor (device to keep the bow into the seas) and prayer. Those engines drummed away months and months on end, so when you got to a port where you actually turned them off finally, the silence was deafening. You slept to that music. You felt like you could count the cylinders. My sweep had four Packard (yes, the motor car company) aluminum diesels. That was heavy work in hot conditions, but those guys played those machines like violins, if you will.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. tbradsim1

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    Ken you and wife are special people, Son is a Hero in my book. As I say often, there are no words, you've carved a place to sit besides your Dad.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. nevadablue

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    Thanks Brad. I think we all do what we must. It has been 11 years this month since he came home. My biggest worry is what happens after his mom and I are gone. God will provide, I am confident.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. fnord

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    I'm late to the forums this evening but I've spent my day sending out best wishes to all my friends and family members on Armistice Day.

    Bradley: Thank you for posting that pix of your son in the tandem jump.

    Al: How old was your dad when he shipped out to French Indo-China? He must've been on the cusp, pal. I thought that was a CIB in the first photo and the second pix, with your old man holding his frame of medals and spotting a starred CIB with a clusterd Bronze Star? Man, he was a warrior!

    MSO: What a pedigree! I am humbled and truly grateful.

    Ken: PM sent. Your warfighter son deserves the best our country has to offer.

    To all of you veterans: peacetime or conflict, our thanks.

    Fnord

    It ain't the way I wanted it! I can handle things! I'm smart! Not like everybody says - like dumb - I'm smart and I want respect!
    Fredo Corleone
    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. ssjones

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    @fnord:
    He was drafted in '42, so he was 21. I was just thinking, I have no clue what he did between his ages of 18 and 21!

    He did mop-up operations on Saipan in '44.

    After WWII he was a military detective in Austria (Salzburg & Linz), primarily homicide. Think "The Third Man" movie. I found his record book for 1946, there were 2,100 murders in Salzburg in that year!

    He then went to occupied Japan, then to Korea at the onslaught, he ended up twice in Korea, Japan in between.

    Austria and Japan were from '45-'51.

    Vietnam in '68-69.

    After WWII, he was infantry,1st & 26th Infantry divisions.

    He retired in '73.

    His records were lost in the fire at St. Louis. He reconstructed his service record in the 1980's and I had to type it up (and saved).

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. mawnansmiff

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    "The flag is flying on my porch in a puffy breeze on a crisp fall day. Must remember to retire the colors at dusk."

    Flying your nation's flag is one of the most patriotic things one can do. However, here in England it is illegal to fly any flag...including the Union Jack...without seeking (and paying for) and being granted planning permission first...how mad is that?

    Regards,

    Jay.

    ...take up thy stethoscope and walk...
    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. jpmcwjr

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    A moving thread, and hats are off to all Vets, but particularly those above. Fnord said it best, and I'd like to "me too" his post.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. paulie66scandinavian

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    Before my daddy died several years ago I never knew where my grandfather did his war time service,he passed away when I was 5 year old,then in later years when I was asking my father where your father was in those years he kept saying your graddaddy served as an intepreter on POW camp,(my another Grandfather-my mother dad died early in 42 on the front-Finland-Soviet union war)now lets get back to my grand-daddy who was said to be servicing at Pow camp(there were thousads of Soviet union prison kept behind the barbwire in our land back in the days- and all those men who survived after the end of the war were to be back to CCCP)then my father died and I got my hands on war time record book yet found some war time photos of my grandaddy in German Waffen SS uniform.
    based on these doucuments I did found out that he volunteered for service in German SS units//Freiwilliger SS Division Wiking among 3000 other his compatriots and then further this division were deployed on the southern Ukrainian and Russian front.Shortly after when that division was reformed he came back to his fatherland and continued his service as interpreter at Pow camp,That was the story what I found out which nobody wanted to tell me before.I must point out that Finland as a country had very close yet friendly relationships with war time Germany.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. mawnansmiff

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    Paul, interesting to hear your grandfather was an interpreter in WWII. My father was in the Royal Signals based in Italy (1940 - 1946) and was an interpreter and translator (he spoke most European languages plus a smattering of Russian) at an Italian POW camp.

    He told me he was twice reprimanded for not having his service firearm loaded...he told me he was terrified of killing someone!

    His father Isaac (naturally my grandfather) fought in both Boer Wars...he was in his 70's when he sired my father in 1926!!!

    Regards,

    Jay.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. mso489

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    I thought this was an especially good Veterans Day thread. Some moving historical photos of dads in uniform and civies.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. tbradsim1

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    . For my Grandson at school a few years ago, my Family from WWII to Korea, to S Asia to Desert Storm.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  31. nevadablue

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    Here's a bit of related info... Lee Van Cleef apparently served on a mine sweeper in WWII!

    My dad never mentioned him.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  32. paulie66scandinavian

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    Yes this is one of a very interesting thread,Jay:I love the way you are using written english,the lanquage which is famous for being difficult grammatically,especially the so called Oxford English one.As for my grandfather who served in German troops originally he was descendant of Baltic Germans and spoke&wrote fluent German,Russian,French yet Swedesh&Finnish,as a child my late father spend his war time years in Sweden as his parents were afraid that our country will eventually be occupied by Red Army forces which however never happened.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  33. mso489

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    mawn', fascinating about planning permission being needed in UK to fly the Union Jack, or any flag. It would seem to tamp down the enthusiasm, but when in UK I certainly saw some flags flying. Speaking of which, I am pleased to say that my little ship's Stars and Stripes has held up incredibly well. I think it is at least fifteen years old, and has been flown on most appropriate holidays when I'm at home, and it looks almost new. It's good quality, sew stars and stripes as mentioned, and well cared for, I think.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  34. didache

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    mso489 - with respect to Jay, I don't know where he got the idea that flying the union flag was not allowed without permission. This from the official (Crown) rules on it:

    1. Flags Not Requiring Consent
    ...
    The flag of Saint David.
    The flag of Saint Patrick.
    The flag of any administrative area within any country outside the United Kingdom.
    Any flag of Her Majesty's forces.
    The Armed Forces Day flag.
    Any country’s national flag, civil ensign, or civil air ensign.
    The flag of the Commonwealth, the European Union, the United Nations, or any other international organisation of which the United Kingdom is a member.
    A flag of any island, county, district, borough, burgh, parish, city, town or village within the United Kingdom.
    The flag of the Black Country, East Anglia, Wessex, any Part of Lincolnshire, any Riding of Yorkshire, or any historic county within the United Kingdom.

    I note that this means that Jay, being from Cornwall, would be permitted to fly the Cornish flag! It also means that an American, for example, could fly the stars and stripes.

    There are some rules pertaining to the erection of poles, but these are mainly for reasons of safety.

    Hope this clarifies that point.

    A further point though is worth making: the national flag in the UK is NOT the primary symbol of statehood as it is for Americans. In the UK the primary symbol is the Crown, with the flag being only a secondary symbol. This is why British people, generally, do not view the national flag in quite the same rosy way as you guys do across the pond.

    Mike

    "Pipe-smokers spend so much time cleaning, filling and fooling with their pipes, they don't have time to get into mischief." - Bill Vaughan
    Posted 1 year ago #
  35. mso489

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    didache, interesting elucidation of the subject. I don't know, but I'd guess, the U.S. being much younger country with relatively less symbolism and ceremony from the past makes more of the ones we have. Because we are large and prosperous, I think we often forget how young this experiment is. At one time I had a brother-in-law from the Middle East who used to laugh about our antique stores. He'd say, in my country, everything in those stores is old junk. Something has to be about a thousand years old before it is valued for its age. Good point. When people complain about British pronunciation as it differs from American English, I like to say, well, it's their language.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  36. cosmicfolklore

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    The US is a place where we think 100 years is a long time, and England thinks 100 miles is a log way.

    Michael
    Posted 1 year ago #
  37. mawnansmiff

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    I bow my head to Mike's elucidation on the flag issue. Perhaps I read it in the Daily Mail...or was it The Guardian...either way, mea culpa and a hair shirt for a week

    Regards,

    Jay.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  38. didache

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    Jay - no need. You were actually correct until 2012 or so. It was Eric Pickles in his days as Community Secretary who liberalised the rules, mainly because of the upcoming diamond jubilee and a sudden upsurge in flag waving. Pre-Eric you would have been absolutely correct.

    Mike

    Posted 1 year ago #

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