Pipes Magazine » Pipe Tobacco Discussion

Search Forums  
   
Tags:  No tags yet. 

Fly-fishing And No Need To Catch A Fish

(65 posts)
  • Started 2 months ago by aquadoc
  • Latest reply from ophiuchus
  1. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I hit the water for the first time this spring and while the water is too high for serious fishing, just being on the water without a another human for miles was reason enough. I mostly smoked my pipe and watched the wildlife... There seemed to be an inordinate number in my vicinity. From porcupines, fishers, and otters to turkeys and owl's. Maybe it was the Balkan Blue wafting through the air. My condolences to all stuck in the office or behind a wheel today. But I needed this cleansing.

    "If you resolve to give up smoking, drinking and sex, you don't actually live longer; it just seems that way."
    Posted 2 months ago #
  2. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2013
    Posts: 7,491

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The wildlife have good taste in tobacco.

    Arrrrr, shiver me timbers! International Talk Like a Pirate Day is September the 19th!!!
    Brothers Of The Black Frigate
    Posted 2 months ago #
  3. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Yes, they do. The last few ounces I have left. I liked McClelland blends but mostly just Balkan Blue and Blackwoods... And I do miss the vinegary aroma from a new tin.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  4. fluffie666

    fluffie666

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Apr 2014
    Posts: 507

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Fly fishing is one of the things I live for. I was also out today. Found a small mountain creek close to home here in eastern pa. I dipped my bug net in the water, pulled out a green caddis larvae and a light brown colored stone fly nymph. I watched the brookies dart around in the water. Didn't catch a damn thing either but just to be out was beautiful with a bowl of easy smoking Amphora Original. I'll go out again tomorrow. I'm glad you had a good day out there Doc. Plenty of lovely days ahead for it.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  5. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Sounds like a good day was had. I lived in Sinking Spring, PA for a few years. If you haven't fished Pine Creek and tribs above and west of Williamsport (not exactly eastern) such as Slate Run, you need to do so. The pine is more like a Montana River.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  6. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I was seriously considering getting into flyfishing Earlier this year. I have been (regular?) fishing my whole life, and I even dabbled in making my own lures. To be honest, it has been watching guys making the flies that was more alluring to me. But, after going over the prices of poles and all of the needed gear that put me off. I went to a free class on casting at an Orvis location, and then realized that the places that I like to fish just don't have the space for the elaborate casts. My fishing holes are heavily wooded, and the creek running through my property has steep banks. I would be smacking rocks or climbing trees to retrieve my lines. So, I am just going to continue crappie and bass fishing. And, when I am wanting more relaxation, I'll just set down and do some catfishing. But, it is still fascinating to watch someone tie flies.

    Michael
    Posted 2 months ago #
  7. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    If you decide to give it a try, there is some very good gear at reasonable levels of cost. My major professor only used the cheapest of gear and out fished everyone. I do not think his rod/reel cost more than 70 or so dollars.

    And you can roll cast in tight quarters to avoid the trees.

    Also, using a fly for bass or bream is a blast.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  8. tennsmoker

    tennsmoker

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 1,191

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I fly fished a lot of years in Arkansas, Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina. Nothing like it. I tied my own flies and what a thrill that was to hook a rainbow or brown on one of my own ties.
    I haven't hit the stream in a good many years now since my knees gave out. I'd love to go again, but I will just have to live in my dreams.
    Don't give up, Cosmic. My first pair of waders was blue jeans and tennis shoes. I had a Walmart flyrod and reel with the cheapest fly line I could find.
    Before you try tennis shoes, spring for high tops and glue something on the bottom to cut the rock slime, or you will end up down stream.


    The past is never dead. It's not even past--Requiem for a Nun
    Posted 2 months ago #
  9. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hmmm, everyone I have talked to tells me to avoid the cheap... and, at my age, new tricks like just casting might get aggravating, add in avoiding the trees... I don't mind sticking to ultralight gear for my fishing. I find it very rewarding to bring in a 12 pound fish on 5lb line.
    And, you are absolutely right, a bad day fishing beats a good day doing most anything else... except sex, ha ha.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  10. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    You speak truth. And to address the myth of "avoid cheap gear"... A fly reel is nothing more than a spool to hold line. You do not fight a fish using the reel. You use your hands. You could find a vintage thread bobbin for a large loom and it would work just as well. I laugh at the expense of some of the gear. A kit from Cabelas or Redington is cheap and will last a long time if not forever.

    But, ultralight spinning tackle is the best. I too love bass fishing with 6 pound line. The only think I hate is that light line does not handle snags well.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  11. trudger

    trudger

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2019
    Posts: 151

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Sounds awesome Aquadoc! I also am an avid fly chucker. It is always is a thrill to actually catch a fish but it’s also not the end game for me. Lots of challenges in fly fishing no matter what species of fish your after. Tag alders, pine trees, stumps, kayakers, and my big fat head are all things I “catch”. Wading brings its own challenges because I’m a space cadet who forgets he’s standing in moving water (I’m a good swimmer when I’m scared). I tie flies and that brings an extra gotcha when I do land one on a home made.
    Aquadoc is spot on about cost. It’s like buying estate pipes or Danish one offs, both get you where your going.
    Tight lines!!

    Posted 2 months ago #
  12. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I hear you Trudger. I have taken my share of unchosen rides down stream after slipping.

    I am lucky that my profession keeps me in a freshwater stream more often than not. I need to somehow find a pack rod/reel that I can carry with my other gear.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  13. warren

    warren

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2013
    Posts: 7,548

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Michael: Stick to your guns. Fly fishing with an inexpensive rod and reel is very frustrating. The problem arises when someone says, "Try this!" They hand you a fifty year old handcrafted, 12 foot, bamboo rod with a $700.00USD Hardy. The first cast rolls out perfectly and the fly presents with barely a ripple. A 16inch Grayling/Brown or what have you rises and ... now you are the one hooked!

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  14. bassbug

    bassbug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 899

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    If you haven't fished Pine Creek and tribs above and west of Williamsport (not exactly eastern) such as Slate Run, you need to do so.

    I've done it a few times but you're absolutely right. Slate Run and Cedar Run are absolutely magical, especially if you're lucky enough to hit the green drakes.

    I don't care who you are, you're not walking on the water while I'm fishing
    Posted 2 months ago #
  15. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Haha Warren. You can become just as hooked with a cheaper rig. I wish I had the chops to afford a good bamboo rod.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  16. ashdigger

    ashdigger

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 5,244

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I need to somehow find a pack rod/reel that I can carry with my other gear.

    Go with a Tankara rig. Super easy solution.

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 2 months ago #
  17. warren

    warren

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2013
    Posts: 7,548

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Doc: They are magic. An old friend died seven years back and I was gifted his six bamboos. Never would have purchased one myself. I made due with various Sage rods over the years though, thoroughly enjoying myself.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  18. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Ash, that is a cool looking rig. Will watch some videos. That would work great for what I am looking for.

    Bassbug, the upper reaches of the Slate are one of my favorite areas for fishing and just being. Cedar is a bit smaller but I have fished some unreal caddis hatches that left me tired.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  19. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Yeh, Warren, well you were not hurting with the Sage rods. We had a rep come through to give a workshop in the early 90s while working on my masters and he gave the three of us that showed up a Sage second with flaws... Mine has such a minor flaw that most cannot find it. With kids in college, no go on any new purchases. I hope one day to own a bamboo. I have fished with a nice vintage bamboo and you are right.... Magic.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  20. chasingembers

    Embers

    Captain Of The Black Frigate
    Joined: Nov 2014
    Posts: 15,430

    online

    Login to Send PM

    And, you are absolutely right, a bad day fishing beats a good day doing most anything else... except sex, ha ha.

    Many years past that now, but even when younger, fishing was still better.

    Damnation seize my soul if I give you quarters, or take any from you.
    -Edward Teach
    Posted 2 months ago #
  21. fluffie666

    fluffie666

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Apr 2014
    Posts: 507

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The technology of yesterday's gear (five to ten years old) can be purchased today brand new for very reasonable prices. Reddington Crosswater or Path combos (rod and reel) $99 to $170 theses days. It's not the best gear but it's by no means garbage. Throw some better quality line on a set up like that and you'd be ready to fish for under $350 (that's including some leaders, tippet and flies). I purchased my first fly set up at a flea market for all of $15 and learned to fish on that thing. I got it pretty bad after I spent a little time on the water and now purchasing fly gear quickly turned into an expense like food, water and tobacco. Looking back I realize that the quality of line was more important than the quality of rod and reel. I do have yet to try out bamboo. Fly fishing has a lot of worlds to get into.
    I'll certainly check out Slate Run. That's about three hours northwest of me. Thanks for the tip! In terms of finding good fishing spots, 250 miles to travel is no big deal.
    There's nothing like being out on the water with a good pipe smoldering. Catching is an added bonus. Enough of my rambling. Tight lines and great days on the water to you all

    Posted 2 months ago #
  22. bassbug

    bassbug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 899

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I wish I had the chops to afford a good bamboo rod.

    Back in 2003 I had the honour and pleasure of meeting one the finest bamboo rod makers around. Along with a couple of friends he took us under his wing, into his shop and taught us how to build bamboo rods. There's absolutely no comparison between bamboo and graphite or even fiberglass. The action is slow and smooth. The parabolic taper design I prefer bends right down to the grip on a 7'6" 5 wt.

    Find a rodmaker in your area if there's one there. I am absolutely sure he will welcome you with open arms and show you everything he knows. There are no secrets.

    Its super short notice, but there's also a bamboo rodmakers gathering about an hour outside Toronto coming up at the end of the month http://www.canadiancane.com/index.html

    Posted 2 months ago #
  23. newbroom

    newbroom

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2014
    Posts: 5,590

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I recently viewed a video with a fellow who makes 'em. (PBS?) It was impressive how he split the wood, shaped it and put the pieces together. They're comprised of laminated lengths of hand formed bamboo strips. A real art in itself.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  24. brooklynpiper

    brooklynpiper

    Member
    Joined: May 2018
    Posts: 211

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It. Read A River Runs Through It.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  25. cranseiron

    Cranse Iron

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 594

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Nice springtime thread! I started to fly fish a bit when I lived in Utah back in the late 80s/early 90s. Fished the Green some in NE Utah. I do miss that. I've been thinking I might pick it up again down here in south MS fishing river sand bars and using poppers for bream.

    My late father had two bamboo fly rods probably from the late 40s or early to mid 50s time frame. My brother has those now as keepsakes and I don't imagine they should be put to use anyway. Glad things are going well for you, Charles.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  26. pappymac

    pappymac

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2015
    Posts: 1,832

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hmmm, everyone I have talked to tells me to avoid the cheap... and, at my age, new tricks like just casting might get aggravating, add in avoiding the trees...

    Cosmic,

    That sounds a lot like people claiming you have to buy a Dunhill to really appreciate pipe smoking.

    I am glad we have a good admin and responsible moderators.

    Heave to you dark colored ship under sail! Prepare to be boarded!
    Posted 2 months ago #
  27. warren

    warren

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2013
    Posts: 7,548

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That is always a great point. One should examine their expectations when entering a new venture. If you don't want to be the best you really have no need for world class equipment. A practiced fly-fisher can deliver a great presentation with almost anything on the market. But, great gear, not necessarily the most expensive, makes for less effort and should make for a better experience. The better the gear ... the fewer the excuses. With the right gear one has only to work on technique.

    As Michael and others often point out, a bad bowl is more likely the fault of the smoker than the pipe. Skill and technique are much more important than the gear. There is cheap and then there is inexpensive. And, bamboo is now a luxury ... a magical luxury though. I truly hope my prized rods will enchant many more generations of my family or, get passed, not sold, on to others who appreciate the artistry and function of them.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  28. ophiuchus

    ophiuchus

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2016
    Posts: 1,213

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I hear the call of the trout ... heading for the Manistee this weekend.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  29. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    IMHO, fly fishing is similar to pipe smoking. Learn how to cast & fish with a reasonably priced outfit from a respected brand (Cortland, Cabelas, Orvis, Sage, etc.). Once you see what your casting & fishing style is, test cast more upscale outfits (if starter outfit doesn’t cut it). It’s good to have a back up rig incase of damage, or a friend who needs to use it. I still fish my starter rod, a Cortland GRF1000, 8-1/2’ #5 (paid $79 included 444 DT line and an alloy reel.

    Nothing worse than plunking down $4-500 on a rig only to find that it doesn’t suit your style. My favorite rod is a Winston 8’ #5 (WT series) & Orvis CFO IV I bought in 1987.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  30. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Pappy, we have a few experts, writers and teachers of flyfishing on the forum. I'm not going to throw them under the bus. They can see the thread, so they can respond if they want. Also, when I only have talked to experts and Orvis associates, I am probably only going to get recommended to Dunhills, ha ha.

    But, I did do the class also, and realized that at my beginner skill level, and what I'd be willing to spend on a new hobby... well... it just made me appreciate carving and painting a broken-back swimbait lure and fishing like my uncles taught me even more.

    But, yeh, I do like to watch those flyfishing videos... much more interesting to me than watching someone smoke a pipe on youtube.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  31. ashdigger

    ashdigger

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 5,244

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Is this where I chime in and talk bout my cheap fly rods that I've caught a shit ton of fish on and have had a great time? is this also where I chirp in about my old trusty Herter's fly reel that has never let me down?

    Or can I only talk about my artisan bamboo rods that my servants hold whilst I adjust my one-off bespoke waders?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  32. homeatsea

    homeatsea

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2013
    Posts: 534

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I did my entire first season fly fishing using only a roll cast (only way I wasn't whipping off flies on every other cast) on a Redington "combo" package. I think it was the Path. Ran me less than $200 USD. I still had (and am having) a great time with that rod and reel.

    Like all hobbies, it is what you make it. The subject of this post got it right, no need to catch fish if you're enjoying the experience. Funny thing is, the deeper in to the hobby you get the more expensive the materials you "need" seem to get. But that's certainly not a requirement. Just look to the dedicated cob smokers on this forum. They're enjoying their hobby every bit as much as the rest of us for a fraction of the price compared to most of us, if I had to bet.

    -Home At Sea
    Posted 2 months ago #
  33. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 7,727

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    You can’t beat Popeils Pocket Fisherman.

    The Old Cajun
    Posted 2 months ago #
  34. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    No, please talk about your cheap rods. I am not a flyfisherman, as I have said, so this is where I learn something.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  35. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Cabelas has this trout outfit (line, backing, rod, & case) on sale for $75. Model HCF8654C is a 8’6”, 4-pc rod, nice for taking on a plane, easy to pack.

    https://www.cabelas.com/product/bargain-cave/fly-fishing/bargain-cave-rods-reels-line/pc/105591780/c/105763680/sc/105764580/white-river-fly-shop-hobbs-creek-outfit/2909796.uts?slotId=10#tabsCollection.

    IM6 I’d a proven material, makes great medium fast action road blanks, and is forgiving for new flyrodders. Actually, I like it myself, fly fishing for 34 yrs.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  36. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    .....and there is a promotion running now that qualifies the outfit for free shipping...

    Posted 2 months ago #
  37. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    What would be the differences between a cheaper rig like this, and... say... an Orvis rod set up?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  38. krizzose

    krizzose

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2013
    Posts: 995

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I’ve got a Redington 5 wt that was less then $200, and it’s a great stick.

    ophiuchus: Where on the Manistee are you headed? I wish I was headed up there right now with a sink tip and a box full of streamers

    Posted 2 months ago #
  39. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Regarding beginner rods, An Orvis rod would have a nicer looking cork handle, lighter snake guides, probably a more sensitive casting feel than the Hobbs. A rod that gets high marks from experienced anglers is Fenwick AETOS series. Nice thing with the Fenwick, if you decide you want to sell, it will have a decent resell value due to popularity.

    If you’re going to fish mostly trout, panfish, smallmouth bass, I’d go with a 5wt or 6wt rod. A 5wt gets the nod for dry flies, a 6wt for streamers & heavier wet flies. Both weight rods will do the same thing, but a 5wt is a little easier to fis with floating dry flies. A store I really like is George Anderson’s Yellowstone Anglers. The gear review write ups are quite helpful. Here’s one on 5wt rods:

    5wt shootout

    Keep in mind, they sell solid starter rods to top quality rods.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  40. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Today’s starter rods ($200 & under) are notably better casting than the $100 & under rods of 25 yrs ago. When I started out, an old time passed along a nugget of wisdom,, buy a reasonably priced rod & reel. Practice casting, & learn how to fly fish with a mentor.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  41. bassbug

    bassbug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 899

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I'm going to weigh in with a completely different idea...

    Cosmic, as I understand you're pretty good with your hands. You might want to consider building your own rod. You can get complete kits for well under $100 that include a nice rod blank, grip, reel seat and guides.Its not hard to do at all and the best part is it will have your name on it.

    You can build a rod in a weekend if you set your mind to it. I stopped buying flyrods in stores many years ago because i was not willing to pay the exorbitant prices for a decent 5 or 7 piece pack rod.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  42. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Good point bass bug. Last one I built was based on a Sage 590 4 pc. But a good to top quality blank is usually 1/2 price of a new complete rod. Another option are trade-in or demo rods.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  43. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I did consider building one, but having no frame of reference for what a great (much less good) rod would be like, I thought it akin to someone making their first pipe without ever having smoked one.

    So, starting with a cheap rod from say... Cabelas would be an ok start for someone late in life coming to this? It won't build bad habits?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  44. ashdigger

    ashdigger

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 5,244

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Cos, the Cabelas rig will be just fine. I'd go either 5 or 6 weight.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  45. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Well, it really was a really nice day to be on the water. I hope my choice of tackle did not offend the Brookies I did not catch.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  46. User has not uploaded an avatar

    bent1

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2015
    Posts: 239

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Learning to cast on a starter rod will help you determine what you like in a rod. It’s more about technique than tackle imho.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  47. buster

    buster

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 1,363

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Basspro has a “Classic” fly rod that is $99. It occasionally goes on sale. They sometimes have a Fenwick combo for around a hundred bucks that is a steal. When I worked in the fly shop I would recommend TFO because of the quality and lifetime warranty. The combos are around $150-200. If you ever break a tip TFO has a 7 day turnaround to get a new rod to ya.
    You might see f there is a fl fishing club in your area. Clubs sometimes have swap meets, offer casting and tying classes.

    As far as rod weight goes. 5 Wt is a good all around rod. Kind of like a medium spinning rod in the conventional tackle world. Very versatile, good for bass or trout.

    Think slow, act fast.
    Posted 2 months ago #
  48. greatdane

    greatdane

    Junior Member
    Joined: Dec 2018
    Posts: 57

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Flyfishing (and fishing in general) goes hand-in-hand with pipe smoking. I am glad to see so many of my fellow pipers also fish.

    But I envy those who can fly fish now. Where I live (high Rockies), the rivers are basically unfishable for another month due to the spring runoff. And the smaller high mountain streams I like to fish probably wont be ready until July sometime due all the snow we had this winter. Not complaining though, I am blessed to have a gold medal trout river 50 feet from my office

    Posted 2 months ago #
  49. trouttimes

    trouttimes

    Senior Member
    Joined: Nov 2018
    Posts: 1,043

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The runoff has started here in the Colorado high country but with the snow still falling, it could be July before non-dam controlled waters clear. FYI the Colorado Rod Makers gathering will be in Marble again this year in mid July. Some of the best cane rod makers in the Midwest gather to talk rod making and show off their latest creations. Being a cane freak, it's like the Chicago Pipe Show is for many of you. I agree you don't need an expensive rod to enjoy fly fishing but for me, it really ads to the experience much like smoking a Rad Davis pipe. Just like my pipe collection, I have some rods that are 100 years old and some made this winter. I enjoy fishing them all. The important thing I always stress is no matter your gear, just get out there and enjoy the river. There is never a bad day when you are standing in the water waving a long stick.

    “The Road goes ever on and on Down from the door where it began.
    Now far ahead the Road has gone, I must follow if I can
    Posted 2 months ago #
  50. bassbug

    bassbug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 899

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Cabelas would be an ok start for someone late in life coming to this? It won't build bad habits?

    It will be fine. Every rod has its own "personality" but you won't know it till you've used a number of different ones. They're very much like pipes that way and everyone has his/her own preferences. I like a slow action rod that bends down to the grip, it forces me to slow down my casting and makes me more accurate. Some prefer a fast action rod that bends only maybe halfway down and gives them more distance. I find that in trout fishing I rarely cast any more than 20-30 feet anyway though. That brings me to my next point...if you're planning on relatively short casts (no more than say 30-40 feet at most) and a 5 wt or 6 wt rod, don't go spending a fortune on a reel. You won't need the sophisticated drag system for any fish that a 5 wt rod can handle. Spend your money on a more than bargain brand flyline and stock up on leaders and tippet material, you'll go through a lot of it.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  51. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Great advice. I have never used the reel for anything more than a line holder. Put money into the rod and line. And fly tying gear.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  52. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks guys for the suggestions. I will open it back up for consideration. There are still the shrubs and obstacles to take in before I start having to untangle hooks out of limbs. The limitation that I see in flyfishing is that most bass and crappie tend to only feed at the top of the water a couple of times a day. And, then there is the shoals, where the bass feed on the crawfish. I can usually bring home a mess with just a spoon.

    Do I start a new hobby? Or, just enjoy what I have?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  53. ashdigger

    ashdigger

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 5,244

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Cosmic, you can always enjoy what you already enjoy, until you stop enjoying it.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  54. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I can't imagine every "NOT" enjoying fishing of any sort.

    I was at the beach once, watching this guy tossing a net into the water and pulling all sorts of fish straight up onto the pier. The next time we went to the beach, I dropped by the Bass Pro Shop and picked up a net, which was dusty on the shelf. After drawing a small crowd of kids and accidentally falling into the water a few times, I decided that watching someone cast a net was much less aggravating than doing it myself.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  55. tbradsim1

    tbradsim1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 7,727

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wife and I used to go to the Dams in Marsh Island, it was an estuary, wife threw a 6 ft custom cast net, I threw a 7 ft. When water was coming out, you tied up at the dam and threw over the Dam. 25# was the limit for the day. Wife was throwing one day, she had on my Kahki shirt and hair up in baseball cap, a man approached her and said Damn buddy where did you learn to throw, she turn around with her 38s pointing forward, Buddy she said, he stammers, Really sorry Lady, but damn you throw better than a man. I laugh about that a lot. We Cajuns learned seining, cast netting when we were very small. Cosmic I have a foolproof method to learn cast netting, can’t begin to tell you how many people I coached at the dams.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  56. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Ha ha, I bet you could. And, I would need the coaching, as I tend to look like a moron grappling with invisible demons when I cast. Others make it look so graceful. And, when the crappie are running, there have been times when I could just throw a net and get them all.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  57. bassbug

    bassbug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 899

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The limitation that I see in flyfishing

    Contrary to popular belief, flyfishing is not exclusively a topwater activity (but the thrill of a dry fly or popper strike is magic).

    You can fish streamers for trout, bass and crappie all day long if you want to. I've fished as deep at 25 feet with sinking lines.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  58. cosmicfolklore

    Cosmic

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2013
    Posts: 18,163

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Curious, if you’re fishing 25’ down, what difference does the cast make?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  59. ashdigger

    ashdigger

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2016
    Posts: 5,244

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Cos, it doesn't. When i use my buttboat I use sinking line. Catches the big lake trout.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  60. bassbug

    bassbug

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2016
    Posts: 899

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    if you’re fishing 25’ down, what difference does the cast make?

    Draw the triangle in your head.

    Unless the line is directly veritcal you'll need a good 35 or more feet of line to get 25 feet deep

    Posted 2 months ago #
  61. warren

    warren

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2013
    Posts: 7,548

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    You gotta get the fly out there, let it sink and then work it to attract the fish. I do a lot of wet fly fishing, it's an added skill set, different than working the fly on the surface. Sometimes you work it shallow, sometimes down fifteen, twenty feet.

    "Wet" flies imitate larva and emerging bugs. Dry flies imitate develop bugs, landing on the surface. Then there are "flies" that imitate eggs bounding on the stream bed or floating with the current. And, there are leeches, egg sucking leechs and, a favorite up here, leech sucking eggs. They work and they are purely a novelty someone dreamed up over a long, dark, boring winter.

    edit: Fish can be both surface feeders and feed at depth. Sometimes you gotta put the fly below the surface. Lake trout hardly ever hunt on the surface in my experience. So, it's not always simulated flies being fished.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  62. cranseiron

    Cranse Iron

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2013
    Posts: 594

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Think I'm gonna get the Fenwick Aetos 5wt. Any suggestions for a reel?

    Posted 2 months ago #
  63. aquadoc

    aquadoc

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Feb 2017
    Posts: 1,449

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Warren, you left out black ants. One of my fall backs when the hatch match isn't working.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  64. alaskanpiper

    alaskanpiper

    Member
    Joined: May 2019
    Posts: 656

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Fly fishing season is year round up here baby! Just need some chap stick to keep the guide rings from icing up! Here is a decent one from April.......Prince Nymph, one of 11 on the day

    Giving the trout a break while they spawn, salmon season is underway now anyway. Kings now, reds in a few weeks and through July, Silvers in August, then its back to the trout and dollies for Bead season (with a short break for moose season of course!). A few grayling peppered in for good measure. Rainbows on bugs all winter, Situk Steelhead in spring, and then do it all over again!

    There is certainly something about being on the water that is even more addicting than Vitamin N. The tug is the drug, baby!

    "We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us." ---Hank

    "Yeah, well, you know that's just like, uh, your opinion, man..." --- The Dude
    Posted 1 month ago #
  65. ophiuchus

    ophiuchus

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2016
    Posts: 1,213

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    ophiuchus: Where on the Manistee are you headed? I wish I was headed up there right now with a sink tip and a box full of streamers

    Sorry to miss this the first time around, krizzoze ... Tippy Dam! (Didn't catch anything to keep ... didn't matter. It was a great time.)

    Posted 1 month ago #

Reply

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   jpmcwjr, loadclear, monkeylyf, tnfan, chasingembers, ben88, craig61a, loneredtree, alaskanpiper, josephcross, danimalia, thefishguy, ashdigger, lochinvar