To Sell or Not to Sell, that is the question?

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excav8tor

Senior Member
Aug 28, 2010
448
0
South Devon, England
I have been renovating pipes for a few months now and am constantly looking for new stock to renovate. In some of the new stock I get hold of, I occasionally come across a few ‘diamonds in the rough’. Whilst I thank my lucky starts for coming across such a gem, I am also a little disappointed to realise that I will have to sell it to allow me to keep getting more stock in to replace it. There have been a few such examples, one of which was a 1935 Dunhill Root Briar; but until I win the lottery I guess I’m going to be continuing to sell off these gems to help fund my hobby.

I love bringing these old pipes back from the dead, and a large part of me is sad when I have to get rid of them but to misquote Bill Shakespeare mercilessly (again) … I am driven on by the flesh pipes; and he must needs go that the devil drives!

Are there any others out there that have a similar dilemma?

 

wallbright

Preferred Member
Aug 22, 2010
846
0
Yes I sold off the nicer pipes in my lots before. Do you use sand paper or a reamer? Also, do you use a wheel buff?

 

mlaug

Preferred Member
May 23, 2010
908
0
Iowa
What is this word sell?
I'm unfamiliar with this concept regarding pipes.


 

excav8tor

Senior Member
Aug 28, 2010
448
0
South Devon, England
The initial thing I do is ream the pipe. I have a 'SENIOR' reamer which is very good for the job. I then use sand paper to ensure the inside of the bowl has no bumps in it left after reaming. Occasionally I have to lightly sand the whole outside pipe back to uncover loose fills or fills that have come out completely. I then refil any imperfections with a mixture of wwod filler and briar dust, restain and then use a buffer wheel.
I have some taty estate pipes coming in the next couple of days and I think I'll do a complete start to finish photo set and post them along with a commentry in a new topic. An extended Before & After.

 

wallbright

Preferred Member
Aug 22, 2010
846
0
Sounds great. I have done restoring but only with the cotton ball/alcohol method and then bleach for the stem. I don't own a buffer wheel or a buffing cloth so I am looking for a way to be able to buff the pipes and stems. I was thinking of ordering a hand reamer instead of a senior as the senior is out of my budget.Link is here. Do you think it would be worth it or should I just use sand paper? One last question, what grade sand paper do you use?
I was also thinking of getting the brebbia stem polish. Any thoughts on that?

 

unclearthur

Preferred Member
Mar 9, 2010
6,883
0
I don't care for that style of reamer myself as they are easy to get off course with and give you an uneven cut of the cake. My personal favorite for heavy build up is an ancient Kleen Reem that I have had for decades.

http://www.pipesandcigars.com/bjranepipetool.html

This one is also quite good and only 20 bucks

 

excav8tor

Senior Member
Aug 28, 2010
448
0
South Devon, England
In part I agree with arthur and I can see how that can be done, but I haven't had any problems yet using my reamer. Besides, reamers are like pipes, some people get on better with some pipes than others.

It is always a good idea to leave some of the carbon cake otherwise you have to break it back in. But I use 120 grade because the cake you do leave doesn't have to be mirror smooth, in fact it aides cake build-up if it's left a little rough. This can be likened to sanding old paintwork to provide a good key prior to repainting.
If sanding the outer bowl and shank, I don't use anything rougher than 600 (I tend to start off with 800) and it is always wet & dry paper. Then it's just a case of working your way up the grades ie. 800, 1000, 1200, 1500. The smoother the surface the better the finish once it's waxed.
All the equipment for pipe renovation I have collected over the last few months has been from online shops. I tend to go to one shop in the town first and take note of the prices for all the stuff I need. Then I source it online at a price that is a lot cheaper.

 

pstlpkr

Preferred Member
Dec 14, 2009
9,739
0
Birmingham, AL
In as much as I have never refinished a pipe, just cleaned one up for personal use, I am probably the least qualified person to address this topic.

However:

I can't see selling a pipe for one simple reason.

If you sell a pipe then you will have one less.

One less pipe is not as good as one more pipe.

Therefore if you trade for a pipe, then you have the same amount, and while you haven't gained ground, you haven't lost any either.

And, that ain't bad.

 

excav8tor

Senior Member
Aug 28, 2010
448
0
South Devon, England
Some of the things that makes selling estate pipes a little more bearable, have already been mentioned by other members in different threads on this forum. But in essence it is the fact that I am mearly the custodian of the pipe that has lovingly restored it (not necessarily to its factory condition) and looks forward to passing it on to another smoker to look after and enjoy.
And, I still have a very nice collection that I look at or smoke every now and again (and add too as well) all thanks to my hobby which pays for them.