What Can You Tell Me About Lorenzo Pipes.

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pappymac

Preferred Member
Feb 26, 2015
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I've looked on pipedia and pipephil and found little information. I searched online and found the company website but little information.
I am working on two Lorenzo pipes: an Esperia 65S (which is an Oom Paul) and a Ravenna Standard 733 (full bent apple, I think).

Is anyone here familiar with these? I will post photos as soon as I can get some good ones shot.
 

chasingembers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
24,987
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From SMS pipes.


About Lorenzo Pipes

Riccardo Aliverti

Riccardo Aliverti
Massimo Aliverti

Massimo Aliverti
It has been said that Italy is a country where art is a way of life. For more than a century, Lorenzo has been making pipes from the best Mediterranean briars renowned for its beauty of grain and remarkably good smoking qualities. Lorenzo di Donato continues the heritage of creating new briar models and finishes today.
The story of the Lorenzo name begins in 1900 with the partnership of two brothers. The Lana Brothers produced briar pipes for the Italian market under their own brand name. In 1920, Romolo Aliverti, the father of the current owners, joined the Lana firm and reached the level of technical director. Two years later, sales of their pipes outside of Italy markets began and demand throughout Europe steadily increased. By 1939, the factory employed 120 workers, a considerable number for the time. When the Lana Brothers merged with the Tagliabue Pipe Manufacturers in 1946, the brand name was changed to Lorenzo by Lorenzo Tagliabue. Within a few years, Lorenzo Pipes were acclaimed as one of the best briar pipes in the world.
The headquarters of Lorenzo has always been located in the picturesque city of Gallarate, in the pipemaking region of northern Italy. In this enviroment, it is no wonder that Riccardo, Romolo Aliverti's son, showed an interest in pipe making. Under his father's watchful eye in 1954, Riccardo began learning the pipe making trade at the age of fourteen. Riccardo succeeded his father as technical director upon his father's retirement in 1973.
Lorenzo Tagliabue retired in the 1983, leaving no heirs who wished to continue the business. In 1988, Riccardo Aliverti and his wife Gabriella purchased all rights to the Lorenzo trademark from the Taliabue family and production of the renown Lorenzo Pipes resumed.
Lorenzo Pipes has a bright future with the third generation of the Aliverti family working for the company. Massimo Aliverti, Riccardo's son, has been has been with the company as sales director since 1991. He works closely with his father and knows all phases production. Fluent in English, Massiomo has established a broad customer base for Lorenzo around the world.
Those who appreciate a quality Italian briar that give years of smoking pleasure, yet is reasonable priced, will find a Lorenzo pipe an excellent choice.
 

BROBS

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Nov 13, 2019
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Super popular in the 70s... usually with a matte finish, red or orange color (sometimes dark brown) and chunky shapes. The nicer ones had lucite stems. Often lots of fills but solid smoking pipes. The 1970s ones are pretty solid smokers. The “spitfire” series are usually newer and of a lower quality.
 
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