Weird JT Cooke; Weird Damage.

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rodo

Junior Member
May 1, 2014
60
4
Recently received this as a gift from a family member who gave up smoking some years back. I noticed it was damaged so I looked up the maker and was pleasantly surprised to learn about JT Cooke and his pipes...only this one is not like his pipes. From the images you can see where the damage is, right on the end of the stem. (I asked him what the heck, did his dog get ahold of it?) I thought I'd ask Mr. Cooke about repairing it but as his wait list is so long I doubt this would be high on his list of priorities. (Also...er...is Mr. Cooke still alive?) So the issue is this: sure I could get another skilled pipe repair man to make me a new stem but it would not have the JT Cooke logo on it. So, one doesn't want that. Not sure what to do.

And the pipe itself, not a typical blasted JT Cooke. I cannot locate many smooth Cooke pipes out there. I should say, the briar on this piece is spectacular. It is an unassuming pipe, not large, but when one gazes upon the wonders of the briar, well, nice.
 

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jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
15,422
5,077
Monterey Peninsula
What lines!

The stem can be repaired by you, but I can't tell you the best way. It could be repaired by a pro, as well. In the meantime, use a softie bit to cover the hole so you can see how you like smoking it.

Stem damage like that is not unusual.

 
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olkofri

Preferred Member
Sep 9, 2017
3,955
3,498
Maybe some pipe repair maestro can cut off the broken end and reshape the end? The stem would be shortened of course. Why not contact a pipe repair shop and ask them?
 

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peregrinus

Preferred Member
Aug 4, 2019
548
939
Seattle
Also...er...is Mr. Cooke still alive?
Yes, he’s still alive and making pipes. Although he is best known now for his extra craggy (some say carved) blasts, he made many smooth and rusticated pipes in his early career. BTW, he was also once famous for his accurate stem work on high grade estate pipes and did hundreds of stems for the Levins and Bob Hamlin.
Write him, maybe he’ll take this project on and you’ll have a “factory” replacement or repair.
 

kcghost

Preferred Member
May 6, 2011
2,549
306
Ask George Dibos if you will to pay to have it fixed. You want some one who is very very good at pipe repair not just a restorer who does simple repairs. In any event if he has to make a new stem you must keep the old stem so that when the time come you can sell it as a complete J.T. Cooke pipe.
 

rodo

Junior Member
May 1, 2014
60
4
Terrific suggestions, thanks everyone. I did try writing to Cooke through his website. Hopefully a response soon. Other suggestions are much appreciated.
 
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craiginthecorn

Preferred Member
May 8, 2017
1,183
202
Sugar Grove, IL, USA
Jim Cooke is very much alive and well. The mere fact that the pipe is smooth tells us that it's a somewhat older Cooke. He hasn't made smooth pipes in years. He told me not long ago that ”A smooth pipe is like a beautiful woman that is still wearing her clothing."

It's unlikely that Jim would take on the repair. George Dibos is certainly a great choice. George also has endorsed the work of Anthony Cook.
 
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ssjones

Moderator
Staff member
May 11, 2011
14,604
1,021
Maryland
postimg.cc
I was going to suggest it was an early Cooke. He has really dropped out of sight in the last few years, glad to hear he is still kicking.

That hole can repaired, but a repair like that will have limitations, so a replacement stem is probably the best route. I'm sure George D will tell you, with those angles, a proper replacement isn't a slam dunk either.

Keep us updated, I'd love to see the repair/replacement.
 
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