The Benefits of Nature and a Comparison to Pipesmoking

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Gecko

Member
Dec 6, 2019
240
448
Sweden
Haha 🙂 I guess I should have seen that coming 👍
Any place particular in Alaska to check out?
I was a bit concerned about schools/hospitals in Alaska and it being a bit to rural, but maybe that's just predjudice on my part. What I know about Alaska I mainly got from reading Michener 😉
 

alaskanpiper

Preferred Member
May 23, 2019
5,815
14,252
Alaska
Haha 🙂 I guess I should have seen that coming 👍
Any place particular in Alaska to check out?
I was a bit concerned about schools/hospitals in Alaska and it being a bit to rural, but maybe that's just predjudice on my part. What I know about Alaska I mainly got from reading Michener 😉
Haha Michener is a bit outdated. Anchorage is a modern city of 300,000. Plenty of good schools and multiple modern, large, competent hospitals, costco, walmart, downtown bar scene, you name it. Although it is still only minutes from everything you inquired about, you can be in the woods in 15 minutes if you want to be. It is also a good place to be in the state geographically centralized and close to world class hiking, fishing, oceans, lakes, rivers, etc. It also and has some of the mildest winters in the state.

There are many more rural feelings areas minutes outside of Anchorage as well, such as where I live on the Knik RIver (about an hour from Anchorage). Others close to Anchorage include Eagle River, Chugiak, Girdwood, The Matanuska-Susitna Valley, and more.

Fairbanks and Juneau would be the next two options, as far as modern conveniences, but Juneua is quite isolated and way Southeast, not on the road system, and doesn't give you as much access to the rest of the state as Anchorage does. Fairbanks is in the interior, much smaller, MUCH colder, and a little boring, although would still have plenty of wilderness access.
 
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Gecko

Member
Dec 6, 2019
240
448
Sweden
Haha Michener is a bit outdated. Anchorage is a modern city of 300,000. Plenty of good schools and multiple modern, large, competent hospitals, costco, walmart, downtown bar scene, you name it. Although it is still only minutes from everything you inquired about, you can be in the woods in 15 minutes if you want to be. It is also a good place to be in the state geographically centralized and close to world class hiking, fishing, oceans, lakes, rivers, etc. It also and has some of the mildest winters in the state.

There are many more rural feelings areas minutes outside of Anchorage as well, such as where I live on the Knik RIver (about an hour from Anchorage). Others close to Anchorage include Eagle River, Chugiak, Girdwood, The Matanuska-Susitna Valley, and more.

Fairbanks and Juneau would be the next two options, as far as modern conveniences, but Juneua is quite isolated and way Southeast, not on the road system, and doesn't give you as much access to the rest of the state as Anchorage does. Fairbanks is in the interior, much smaller, MUCH colder, and a little boring, although would still have plenty of wilderness access.
Thanks man! Great information, much appreciated!
 

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pappymac

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Feb 26, 2015
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Haha Michener is a bit outdated. Anchorage is a modern city of 300,000. Plenty of good schools and multiple modern, large, competent hospitals, costco, walmart, downtown bar scene, you name it. Although it is still only minutes from everything you inquired about, you can be in the woods in 15 minutes if you want to be. It is also a good place to be in the state geographically centralized and close to world class hiking, fishing, oceans, lakes, rivers, etc. It also and has some of the mildest winters in the state.

There are many more rural feelings areas minutes outside of Anchorage as well, such as where I live on the Knik RIver (about an hour from Anchorage). Others close to Anchorage include Eagle River, Chugiak, Girdwood, The Matanuska-Susitna Valley, and more.

Fairbanks and Juneau would be the next two options, as far as modern conveniences, but Juneua is quite isolated and way Southeast, not on the road system, and doesn't give you as much access to the rest of the state as Anchorage does. Fairbanks is in the interior, much smaller, MUCH colder, and a little boring, although would still have plenty of wilderness access.
I've wondered how much Alaska has changed since the early 1970s. I've been to Juneau, Kodiak, Nome, Point Barrow and even Adak Island before it was shut down. My only time in Anchorage was an hour spent in the airport. Those visits were part of two government paid "cruises".
 

smokiespiper123

Preferred Member
Sep 4, 2019
666
2,211
East TN
This most excellent thread got met to thinking.

If one were live in the USA and wanted rural living with all the qualities discussed in this thread. Close to great nature, mountains, canoing, hiking, cross country skiing (national parks?) The serenity of open views. Perhaps with a few acres of your own land. But still with acces to decent hospital and decent schools. Where would that be?

Being a Scandinavian I don't really know much about American geography or living conditions but I'm thinking maybe Montana?
East Tennessee
 
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mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
30,664
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Since people are still mostly evolved to live outdoors, the stress of indoor and sedentary life is hard on the system unless it is balanced with a lot of outdoors. I grew up in a suburb with lots of outdoor time, and I've lived in remote places like Midway Island, and in downtown Milwaukee, and various small and medium sized cities. I've spent a lot of time in Chicago and some time in New York City, London, Dublin, and Amsterdam. A lot depends on using the environment and taking advantage of what it offers, whether it is wilderness or city culture. I've always enjoyed visiting a city if I spent a lot of time walking and otherwise being outdoors.
 

alaskanpiper

Preferred Member
May 23, 2019
5,815
14,252
Alaska
I've wondered how much Alaska has changed since the early 1970s. I've been to Juneau, Kodiak, Nome, Point Barrow and even Adak Island before it was shut down. My only time in Anchorage was an hour spent in the airport. Those visits were part of two government paid "cruises".
Haha, in those locations not a lot has changed since then, aside from maybe Juneau.
 

pappymac

Preferred Member
Feb 26, 2015
2,232
890
Haha, in those locations not a lot has changed since then, aside from maybe Juneau.
I know Adak Island has closed down and is pretty much abandoned.

Tell me the Red Dog Saloon is still in operation. When I was there, they made the best Hot Buttered Rum I had ever tasted. We were only there for 2 days before the captain was asked to keep us aboard ship. Seems like one of my shipmates decided to punch out the headlights on a police car.
 

lawdawg

Preferred Member
Aug 25, 2016
1,112
1,274
This most excellent thread got met to thinking.

If one were live in the USA and wanted rural living with all the qualities discussed in this thread. Close to great nature, mountains, canoing, hiking, cross country skiing (national parks?) The serenity of open views. Perhaps with a few acres of your own land. But still with acces to decent hospital and decent schools. Where would that be?

Being a Scandinavian I don't really know much about American geography or living conditions but I'm thinking maybe Montana?
Pretty much anywhere between the two coasts will have the characteristics you mentioned. Montana is far more remote than you might expect. There is plenty of undeveloped land left all over the U.S. outside of the major cities and away from the east and west coasts. Hell, even large parts of the east and west coasts are rural and undeveloped (northern California, parts of Oregon, most of the coast of Maine). I live in a county where the biggest town has well under 10,000 residents, yet we are only about 45 minutes or so outside of a major city. This is due to geographical / terrain issues that caused the city to expand in one direction, but not the other, so my area just is not very developed and has not been subject to urban sprawl... just the way I like it.

East Tennessee
Agreed. The entire Appalachian mountains are beautiful and underrated.
 
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deadidunn

New member
May 30, 2020
14
31
37
Hineston, LA
I live in the woods, 30 minutes minimum to a small city. I find the peace and quiet delightful. I myself am a quiet person, so i take to naturally peaceful places, prefer them. Hunting, fishing, camping, or just building a fire in the back yard...... i sit and enjoy the stillness and observe nature. It is an unmatched soul soothing experience.
In high school, I lived with my mom in Denver and Lake Charles. City life had it's perks, but i vastly prefer life in the woods. I love to cook, so if there is a new meal I'd like that's unavailable to me, I'll just pick the ingredients and try it out. However, from nature to the skillet while out in the woods is still more satisfying to me.
 

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