Presbyterian Mixture Review

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TheDesertPiper

Starting to Get Obsessed
Apr 5, 2021
137
538
Arizona
I purchased a tin of Presbyterian from my local B&M some months ago while I was searching for new English blends to try, I then promptly and completely forgot about it as I tried and acquired other blends. I was moving and reorganizing all of my pipes and tobaccos earlier this week to try and make things look a little bit neater and found the unopened tin. I decided I should go ahead and try it out. To my nose, the tin note is floral, a little earthy, and maybe has some traces of leather. The tobacco felt like it was at an adequate level of moisture right out of the tin, but I still let some dry on a plate for about 5-10 minutes before smoking. After drying I did as I normally do. I packed a bowl full and stepped outside to light up. Upon the first light I got a very grassy and somewhat floral flavor. I read others reviews of Presbyterian and many people say there is a sweetness, and citrusy flavor from the Virginias, but I didn't get much if any of that. I carried on smoking and it seemed like the longer I smoked the more the flavors began to change. When I was about half way through the bowl, it began to taste much more earthy, almost herbal, with a peppery spicy flavor on my exhales. The smoke also felt, as well as looked thicker and creamier at this point. The longer I went, the better I thought it tasted. It burned cool, evenly, and lot faster then I thought it would. It seems like most English blends take me a very long time to smoke, but this one was pretty quick. It took me maybe 45 minutes to smoke a full bowl out of my Savinelli Bing's favorite. I found that to be a plus though. It's so hot out even when the sun is going down that I don't want to be outside for more then an hour. All in all I really liked it. It was a lighter then a lot of other English blends I have tried, so it works better when its hot out. Id would definitely recommend giving it a try if you haven't. I think you will find it to be an interesting experience.
 

Mar 1, 2014
3,650
4,923
Presbyterian is definitely a top 10 blend for me, and one of the only blends that has no bulk equivalent.

From what I gather this is similar to Samual Gawith Skiff or Squadron Leader, so if those are sought after blends for you then it might be worthwhile looking into Presbyterian.
 

mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
41,210
60,474
It's one of my library of unopened tins, so I'm glad to have additional commentary on it. I tend to like robust English blends like Old Joe Krantz and Bayou Night from C&D, but one of my all-time favorite milder English blends was Nat Sherman 536, really refined with several levels like a special wine, but alas, no longer made.
 

ofafeather

Lifer
Apr 26, 2020
2,769
9,055
51
Where NY, CT & MA meet
It's one of my library of unopened tins, so I'm glad to have additional commentary on it. I tend to like robust English blends like Old Joe Krantz and Bayou Night from C&D, but one of my all-time favorite milder English blends was Nat Sherman 536, really refined with several levels like a special wine, but alas, no longer made.

Definitely not robust in terms of Latakia presence. Oriental forward, Latakia is present but more in the background.
 

anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
15,942
29,875
45
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
It's one of my library of unopened tins, so I'm glad to have additional commentary on it. I tend to like robust English blends like Old Joe Krantz and Bayou Night from C&D, but one of my all-time favorite milder English blends was Nat Sherman 536, really refined with several levels like a special wine, but alas, no longer made.
you'd probably dig the Presbyterian a lot then. It's different but on a similar wave length as the Nat.
 

bayareabriar

Part of the Furniture Now
May 8, 2019
956
1,561
Is this anything like Kramer’s? I haven’t tried this one yet. Just had Kramers English from 2018 and it’s a pretty strong smell for me. Still trying to find what I really enjoy. I was thinking of buying this one.
 

indoeuro

Part of the Furniture Now
Jul 30, 2019
532
557
Central Texas
It's one of my library of unopened tins, so I'm glad to have additional commentary on it. I tend to like robust English blends like Old Joe Krantz and Bayou Night from C&D, but one of my all-time favorite milder English blends was Nat Sherman 536, really refined with several levels like a special wine, but alas, no longer made.
I am flabbergasted at the thought that there is a blend which you have not tried. I'ma have to go pray on this.
 

indoeuro

Part of the Furniture Now
Jul 30, 2019
532
557
Central Texas
Is this anything like Kramer’s? I haven’t tried this one yet. Just had Kramers English from 2018 and it’s a pretty strong smell for me. Still trying to find what I really enjoy. I was thinking of buying this one.
I don't find many similarities between the two. Presbyterian is more focused on the interplay between the Orientals and Virginias, with Cyprian Latakia (that smoky, strong aroma in Kramer's English) playing a supporting role. It's sweet (Virginia) and sour (Orientals) in the best way, with just enough Latakia used as a condiment to harmonize and elevate the other components. Kramer's English, like most of what can be considered "full English" blends, uses Latakia as a major component rather than as a condiment.
 

bayareabriar

Part of the Furniture Now
May 8, 2019
956
1,561
I don't find many similarities between the two. Presbyterian is more focused on the interplay between the Orientals and Virginias, with Cyprian Latakia (that smoky, strong aroma in Kramer's English) playing a supporting role. It's sweet (Virginia) and sour (Orientals) in the best way, with just enough Latakia used as a condiment to harmonize and elevate the other components. Kramer's English, like most of what can be considered "full English" blends, uses Latakia as a major component rather than as a condiment.
Very helpful