One I Found But Didn't Buy

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
.

Log in

Search on Site

SmokingPipes.com Updates

2 Fresh Michael Parks Pipes
6 Fresh Castello Pipes
24 Fresh Brebbia Pipes
96 Fresh Savinelli Pipes
6 Fresh Ashton Pipes

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
Tobacco Treasures Ad
.

Recent Posts

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
Tobacco Treasures Ad
.

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
.

warren

Preferred Member
Sep 13, 2013
8,378
2,891
Very much similar to the ivory carvers of Alaska. There are one or two true artists up here. They cater to the discerning collector. By and large most of the carvers turn out "quick and dirty" for the tourist trade. Nothing wrong with that of course and some of the work is really very good. It's just not "top quality." Collectors need a discerning, trained eye. Meerschaum collectors need the same if they are in the market for top-level work. If they are simply looking for an "interesting" piece to smoke, well ... a reasonable looking pipe should satisfy.
 

pappymac

Preferred Member
Feb 26, 2015
2,416
1,451
The photo doesn’t do justice to the pipe. There is a lot more detail than the photos shows. That being said, I would say it was carved after 1960s. The pieces are joined by screw in nylon fittings.
 

pappymac

Preferred Member
Feb 26, 2015
2,416
1,451
This looks like a cheroot holder to me rather than a pipe. Lovely presentation nonetheless.
No. It's definitely a pipe. The bowl is too big for a cheroot and if you did stick one in the bowl, it would be pointed straight up.
 

jonasclark

Preferred Member
Aug 4, 2013
540
114
Seattle
I'm very critical of meerschaum. Yes, as photos posted by georged show, antique meerschaums can be incredible. But even among pre-1900s meerschaums, for every stunning pipe, there are hundreds of mediocre ones. The same is true of Turkish meerschaums. There was a trend in Turkish meerschaums in the 1970s for enormous "show pipes," and the pipe pappymac found is one of them. In my experience, most of these have an instant wow factor, which begins to fade as you pick it up and examine it. I think the carving on this particular pipe is of that sort-- the moment I saw it, I said "oh, would ya lookit that!" and then... hoo boy. Not as great as I'd thought. The stark whiteness suggests okay- but not great-quality meerschaum, the case isn't really great... For $250, I'd pass. Actually, for $100 I'd pass.
 

sablebrush52

Preferred Member
Jun 15, 2013
11,980
9,515
SoCal
jrs457.wixsite.com
Have you guys ever seen the sort of meer carving that was done in the latter half of the 19th century? (not every pipe, of course, but premium examples)

Be warned... knowing what is possible will spoil you.
The level of carving on many of those old meers was more skilled by several orders of magnitude than we're seeing today. It would be like comparing Michelangelo's David to a pile of Chimpanzee poo.
 

creole

Junior Member
Jul 31, 2019
54
60
The level of carving on many of those old meers was more skilled by several orders of magnitude than we're seeing today. It would be like comparing Michelangelo's David to a pile of Chimpanzee poo.
Indeed. The pipes carved in Vienna were true works of art. The tobacconist I bought my first pipes from had a wonderful collection of old meerschaums and he always lamented the quality of pipes that came out of Turkey.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CoffeeAndBourbon

jonasclark

Preferred Member
Aug 4, 2013
540
114
Seattle
By the way, pappymac, in the late 1800s and early 1900s it wasn't uncommon for cheroot holders of all kinds to aim the cigar at an upward angle or even straight up. The tiny, J-bent antique meers with a little carving atop the low point were for cigarellos or cheroots, and my 1907 Missouri Meerschaum catalog shows tiny pipes of the sort we associate with Popeye which are designated as cigar holders. The pipe in georged's photo having horses and a yellow amber stem is a cheroot holder.
 
  • Love
Reactions: anotherbob

pappymac

Preferred Member
Feb 26, 2015
2,416
1,451
By the way, pappymac, in the late 1800s and early 1900s it wasn't uncommon for cheroot holders of all kinds to aim the cigar at an upward angle or even straight up. The tiny, J-bent antique meers with a little carving atop the low point were for cigarellos or cheroots, and my 1907 Missouri Meerschaum catalog shows tiny pipes of the sort we associate with Popeye which are designated as cigar holders. The pipe in georged's photo having horses and a yellow amber stem is a cheroot holder.
I know what you're saying. I see a lot of cheroot and cigar holders and they tend to have narrower bowls. The Robusto I had with me was too loose in it.

I should have taken a picture of the bowl.
 

lawdawg

Preferred Member
Aug 25, 2016
1,421
2,433
Beautiful meer carvings in this thread. Some of them are just so well done that I wouldn't even want to own them! I'd be afraid of breaking it somehow.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CoffeeAndBourbon

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

.
.