Nadir Of Dunhills?

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georged

Lifer
Mar 7, 2013
5,586
14,509
That’s genuinely surprising to me—I would’ve thought that you of all people, have seen and handled more Dunhill pipes than virtually anyone.

Probably some truth to it, not counting B&M owners.distributors/etc.

Which makes me think maybe they just didn't sell very many of them. "Invention-y" designs were more of a lower/mid level thing, meaning not appealing to snooty, wealthy, purist monocle'd Gentlemen in tophats and tails. i.e. the typical Dunhill customer.
 
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jguss

Lifer
Jul 7, 2013
2,509
6,600
Probably some truth to it, not counting B&M owners.distributors/etc.

Which makes me think maybe they just didn't sell very many of them. "Invention-y" designs were more of a lower/mid level thing, meaning not appealing to snooty, wealthy, purist monocle'd Gentlemen in tophats and tails. i.e. the typical Dunhill customer.

I knew a guy with monoclecleosis once. Snooty doesn’t begin to cover it.

IMG_0490.jpeg
 

Winnipeger

Lifer
Sep 9, 2022
1,288
9,676
Winnipeg
@Winnipeger

Like any organic or handmade product, there is going to be variation—any pipe you consider will need to be looked at on a pipe by pipe basis no matter what year or decade it’s from.

Since you requested images, I just took some quick pics of some Dunhills I have on hand: Two birth year pipes from 1963, a 1976, and a 1977:

View attachment 266091

View attachment 266092

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Thanks for the pics!

I think it goes without saying that pipes need to be considered on an individual basis. Maybe I'm a victim of confirmation bias, but both of those '63's look like sweet briars that I would take a second look at if I saw them come up for sale, while both the '76 and '77 are just meh to my eye. The grain is OK on the Hungarian, but the shallow blast lacks contrast, so it looks flat compared to '63 shell. The '77 Bruyere doesn't seem to pop the way the '63 does. It's hard to tell these things based on pictures alone, but that's how I buy pipes—based on online photos. Any agreement on my impressions, or am I missing something?

I just, more often than not, see '77's that I would never consider shelling out the cash for. I'm not particularly bothered by that. Just wondered if anyone else had a similar experience.

How are the bit and button on that '77 compared to the '63 apple?
 
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Dec 3, 2021
5,048
42,885
Pennsylvania & New York
Thanks for the pics!

I think it goes without saying that pipes need to be considered on an individual basis. Maybe I'm a victim of confirmation bias, but both of those '63's look like sweet briars that I would take a second look at if I saw them come up for sale, while both the '76 and '77 are just meh to my eye. The grain is OK on the Hungarian, but the shallow blast lacks contrast, so it looks flat compared to '63 shell. The '77 Bruyere doesn't seem to pop the way the '63 does. It's hard to tell these things based on pictures alone, but that's how I buy pipes—based on online photos. Any agreement on my impressions, or am I missing something?

I just, more often than not, see '77's that I would never consider shelling out the cash for. I'm not particularly bothered by that. Just wondered if anyone else had a similar experience.

How are the bit and button on that '77 compared to the '63 apple?

The bit on the ’77 is very slightly wider than the ’63, but very close in all other aspects. I’m not really a clencher, so the bit is not the greatest factor for me. I got the ’77 because the price was right at the time, nothing more. Both ’63 pipes appealed to me for different reasons—the first because they were birth year pipes; the Driway because of its oddity and being so rarely seen; the Apple/Prince because of aesthetics—the shape and grain pleased me.

The main reason for my interest in the ’76 (apart from kind of wanting to add a Hungarian shape to the arsenal) was because it is marked “NOT FOR SALE,” which lends a degree of rarity and unusuality that appeals to my sensibilities (I like oddball/unique pipes—like my 1948 Comoy’s Olympic that commemorated the London games of that year); the ’76 pipe also came with some index cards from the previous owner which documented what blends and when they were smoked in the pipe, which was kind of fun.

IMG_20230312_234627.jpg
 

Cloozoe

Part of the Furniture Now
Sep 1, 2023
981
19,448
Probably some truth to it, not counting B&M owners.distributors/etc.

Which makes me think maybe they just didn't sell very many of them. "Invention-y" designs were more of a lower/mid level thing, meaning not appealing to snooty, wealthy, purist monocle'd Gentlemen in tophats and tails. i.e. the typical Dunhill customer.

IMG_5925.jpeg
 
  • Like
Reactions: pipenschmoeker123