My First Corn Cob

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Lumbridge

(Pazuzu93)
Feb 16, 2020
712
2,586
Cascadia, U.S.
An odd feature of cobs is the bit of shank that juts into the chamber.
Some say to chisel it out and others to smoke/burn it off.
I just pop in a few meer chips or Nording Keystones and load up. Don’t want the taste of burning wood spoiling my smoke.
I never understood the deal with removing the shank in the bowl or trying to burn it out. They smoke fine as they come from the factory. Most of mine have charred, but I never experienced a foul taste at the bottom.
 

Lumbridge

(Pazuzu93)
Feb 16, 2020
712
2,586
Cascadia, U.S.
So I have decides to try out corn cob pipes. I bought the Country Gentleman by Missouri Meerschaum on eBay and I've heard you've got to smoke them differently than briars. Any tips and comments are appreciated.
Cobs are great smokers. I wouldn't say that they need to be smoked in a different way than a briar, but they do have a much more open draw than many briar pipes, so one must resist the urge to puff away rapidly. The Country Gentleman is a great choice, hope you like it!
 

makhorkasmoker

Part of the Furniture Now
Aug 17, 2021
575
1,375
Central Florida
If you’re smoking without a filter, I recommend experimenting with tighter packs—depending on what tobacco you’re smoking, how moist it is. This will slow down the wide open draw.

I was also recommend removing the stem after every smoke or at least most smokes and swabbing out the inner shank with a folded pipe cleaner. The inner shank is cavernous in those things and a lot of moisture and tars will build up in there otherwise—especially if the cob gets heavy use.

Finally I suggest patience. In my experience cobs usually get better with time and smoking. A few dozen smokes will only improve it. I few hundred can make it outstanding
 

hoipolloiglasgow

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 14, 2023
265
878
United States
I never understood the deal with removing the shank in the bowl or trying to burn it out. They smoke fine as they come from the factory. Most of mine have charred, but I never experienced a foul taste at the bottom.
They actually smoke better without that piece in there. I have a custom cob that purposely doesn't feature that. And that's the reason why people remove that part.20231211_134025.jpg20240202_181848.jpg
 
Last edited:

FurCoat

Lifer
Sep 21, 2020
8,940
80,544
North Carolina
An odd feature of cobs is the bit of shank that juts into the chamber.
Some say to chisel it out and others to smoke/burn it off.
I just pop in a few meer chips or Nording Keystones and load up. Don’t want the taste of burning wood spoiling my smoke.

My first (and only) cob.
Courtesy of a generous Dave (@Ahi Ka )
View attachment 284678
I've got cobs I've smoked for 30 years and that bit of shank is still intact. It's so soaked in tar that there is no chance of getting that burnt wood taste.
 
May 2, 2018
3,839
29,450
Bucks County, PA
MM 🌽 cobs have a wide open draft unless filtered (not sure if it’s already been mentioned) so it takes some getting used to, but once you’ve adjusted your intake and cadence… it’s an excellent smoking experience which I often prefer. Smoke is cool & clean most of the time & you can beat the 💩 out of them & not feel bad about it. 👍☕
 

Bbailey324

Lifer
Jun 29, 2023
1,230
15,044
Austin, TX
Cobs aren't very fussy to smoke. I like the open draw without a filter and don't worry about the shank portion in the bowl. Until they get burned down and tarred up I can taste when the ember gets to that point and stop smoking. It does waste a bit of tobacco but not so bad in the grand scheme of things.
 
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