John Donohoe's Death Commemorative Pipes?

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daimyo

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May 15, 2014
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Curious if anyone is aware of or has any information on the pipes described here?
" On the afternoon of 1 September 1830 John Donohoe was shot dead by the soldier John Muckleston following a shootout between bushrangers and troops at Bringelly, New South Wales.

The Sydney Gazette on behalf of all respectable citizens rejoiced at John Donohoe's death.

Smoking pipes made in the shape of Donohoe's head included holes representing the bullet-holes in his forehead. These pipes were bought and smoked by the citizens of Sydney. "

(Wiki on Australian Bushranger John / Jack Donohoe)

 

jkrug

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Jan 23, 2015
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WOW! I'm not familiar with these pipes at all but the story behind them is fascinating. Love that they disliked him enough to include the bullet holes in his forehead! 8O

 

daimyo

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May 15, 2014
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Indeed, the description really caught my attention. I know it's a long shot but with so many knowledgeable smokers from around the globe, I have my fingers crossed.

 

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aldecaker

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Feb 13, 2015
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Makes me want to break out my MIG welder and fab up a Ned Kelly bushranger pipe! Probably smoke a little hot, though...

 

fmgee

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Sep 26, 2014
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Australian's love affair with Bushrangers is an interesting one, the anty authority vein is still present in the culture. I have not heard of these pipes. Given the time frame the colony of New South Wales was only 42 years old, I wonder what they were making pipes out of then. I am reading a book set in New Zealand not long after this time frame and it refers to people using a pipe stem stuck into hollowed out potatoes as they could not afford a proper pipe. Perhaps a good way to rehydrate dry tobacco?

 

jkrug

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Jan 23, 2015
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I went to Wiki and read some of the stories and old newspaper articles. Very good reading. The pipes were made out of clay. :puffy:

 

misterlowercase

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May 31, 2012
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Fascinating stuff.
I've never really looked into the Bushranger thing.
Learned a new term in relation to Australia,

"convict era",

interesting.
This is a good read too,

http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks12/1201961h.html
Could find no examples of clay pipes modeled after Donohoe.
The clay pipe research in Oz doesn't seem as comprehensive yet as compared to England's archiving efforts,

but here's a good basic primer,

perhaps punching in Oz clay pipe maker names will lead somewhere?

http://www.ashadocs.org/aha/17/17_04_Gojak.pdf
:idea:

:!:
Offtopic...
Although currently I've been enraptured in rampant Anglophilia, I can still laugh at and find humour in the harsh old British class distinctions - I can relate to how at one time British culture characterized Australians as mannerless rough heathen hillbillies because I'm from the South and we were characterized much the same way by "sophisticated Northerners" for quite some time.
I love Aussie slang too.
One of my faves is "gone troppo",

because I am quite mad.
Or,

"all froth and no beer" = superficial; silly.
A good primer:

http://www.dagree.net/aussieslang/
And,

a good article about the decline of Aussie slang:

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-27805070
A while back I saw The Adventures of Barry Mckenzie on TCM, and enjoyed it greatly,

by Bruce Beresford of Breaker Morant fame (which is a GREAT movie).
Barry Humphries is spectacular innit!
It has alotta slang,

great phrases like "pommy bastard" 'n suchstuff.
Nice movie review here:

http://www.tcm.com/this-month/article.html?isPreview=&id=982841|963781&name=The-Adventures-of-Barry-Mckenzie
The Adventures of Barry Mckenzie

Sort of a predecessor to the bro comedies we have now, "ocker" comedies originated in Australia in the '70s. That term may still be obscure in America, but Down Under it denoted an entire subgenre filled with young, upbeat, lowbrow men who love their women and beer, not necessarily in that order. These mad antics are often laced with social satire, usually at the expense of Australians and other cultures, and include such longtime video and TV staples as Stork (1971), Alvin Purple (1973), and Jock Petersen (1974).
However, the Citizen Kane (1941) of ocker comedies is unquestionably The Adventures of Barry McKenzie (1972), a raucous farce from director Bruce Beresford years before he shot to international fame with Breaker Morant (1980) and Driving Miss Daisy (1989). However, Beresford made his big screen debut with this film, which was an instant local hit and earned back over half its budget in its opening weeks on just eight Aussie screens. Beresford became one of the homeland's biggest names throughout the rest of the decade thanks to a more outlandish, supernatural-tinged sequel, Barry McKenzie Holds His Own (1974), as well as the randy satire Don's Party (1976) and the riveting, underrated heist film, Money Movers (1978).
When Beresford was looking for an inaugural film project, he found it courtesy of a comic strip entitled "Private Eye" created by Barry Humphries, better known to the world as Dame Edna (and with whom he still remains close friends). In fact, the Edna character originated here in this film as Aunt Edna, a colorful character who urges her nephew, Barry (Barry Crocker), to widen his horizons by visiting England. Shot on location both in London and Australia, his random encounter with the local populace around Earl's Court involve drinking, romantic mishaps, con artists, and even BBC television, which forms the basis of the film's climax. Along the way some familiar faces pop up including Peter Cook (shortly before his brief relocation to America), Spike Milligan (a cohort of Cook's from The Goon Show), and veteran actor Dennis Price, who was about to appear in Theatre of Blood (1973).
Perhaps the most enduring social contribution of this film is its colorful dialogue, which rivals A Clockwork Orange (1971) for imaginary slang that became part of the vernacular. New terms for bodily functions are spewed left and right, while even the songs are packed with innuendo and silly schoolboy-level humor. That turned out to be a blessing for Crocker, a crooner with a string of enduring TV themes to his credit including the popular Neighbours. His character's nickname from this film, "Bazza," even stuck to the real man himself as late as the '90s when he made an appearance in Muriel's Wedding (1994). In fact, his contributions to charity and entertainment even earned him the Order of Australia in 1987.
The plan to shoot in both Australia and England resulted in numerous production headaches, with the use of British crew members for the local shoot ruffling some feathers. An official statement from the film's production company, Longford Productions, after its box office success summed up their attitude succinctly: "Despite ratty unions, sour critics, dopey censors and aggravating, overwhelming distribution problems, the Australian film can make it." The film was never meant to be a critic's darling, and despite its warm reception both locally and in the U.K., it has yet to receive an official home video release of any kind in the United States (where Aussie films wouldn't gain traction for a few more years). Even if you don't know what every word means, it's still a film best watched with a coldie in your hand and your favorite sheila by your side.
By Nathaniel Thompson
This party clip especially touches upon the "cultural differences"...

"The occasional, odd chilled glass of amber fluid"
http://aso.gov.au/titles/features/adventures-barry-mckenzie/clip1/
Trailer:
:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4sjyrmSXOw
:
I haven't seen the 2nd flick,

Barry Mckenzie Holds His Own,

but this clip is purdy damn great!
:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL5cA4-ztQY
:P

 

daimyo

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May 15, 2014
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Thanks for the input Mr. Lowercase, looks like I have some more looking to do. As always I appreciate the tangent and related info.

 
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