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HawkeyeLinus

Lifer
Oct 16, 2020
5,612
41,214
Iowa
Sorry to be a pedant, however the entire world spells it without an 'e', apart from USA and Ireland. Even in America there are outliers. Most notably Makers Mark spell it without an 'e'.
View attachment 219130
MM does it as an "homage". Reading the history of the spelling can be entertaining. The break largely came when a few Irish producers decided to add the "e", but even then it wasn't 100% for some time after, and before that was spelled the same as Scotch whisky.

To be single malt Scotch whisky there are specific requirements. Beyond that - the joker is and has been wild, lol, but I think the Irish produced has uniformly had the "e" for a long time.

Thank goodness "milk" is uniform and we learned as kids that chocolate milk comes from brown cows!
 

Old_Newby

Part of the Furniture Now
Jan 1, 2022
520
1,319
Texas
ok maybe it was the peat. Today I tried Glen Fohdry 12 and Shieldaig Blended Classic and I am pretty happy with them both. I think it’s the smoky peat that I don’t like if it’s too strong. I prefer fruity finish over a smoky finish.
 

anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
15,937
29,869
45
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
I am American and love bourbon but wanted to expand on whisky. I tried some Scotch and my palette does not like malted barley. I tried Ardbeg 10 and my nose tried to remove itself from my face. I tried a low cost Irish whiskey called Kilbrin and I like the smoothness, the grain profile is good (not malty), it’s fruity, but it’s just too mild with no good flavor. Does anyone have a recommendation?
Generally you described my experience with Irish Whisky. I am sure there are ones I'd really enjoy instead of thinking I'd prefer any other whisky. What you need to try are the Japanese whiskeys if you have not. Any of them but start with the basics.
 
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mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
41,210
60,474
I guess I don't drink whisky/whiskey often enough to remember the spelling variations, but this may help me to remember that it is the Irish who like that "e." When mentioning it as an aromatic flavoring, I'm always stuck on the spelling.

I'm not fond of silent letters in words, but I like to abide by tradition when possible. Language is so malleable and ever-changing, the illusion of consistency is probably helpful to understanding.

For the Kentucky Derby, I'll choose between Makers Mark and Jack Daniels, and dust off one of those bottles. Yup, they actually get dusty.
 
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gubbyduffer

Can't Leave
May 25, 2021
441
1,482
Peebles, Scottish Borders
I am American and love bourbon but wanted to expand on whisky. I tried some Scotch and my palette does not like malted barley. I tried Ardbeg 10 and my nose tried to remove itself from my face. I tried a low cost Irish whiskey called Kilbrin and I like the smoothness, the grain profile is good (not malty), it’s fruity, but it’s just too mild with no good flavor. Does anyone have a recommendation?
Its been mentioned, but I don't think it's the fact the barley is malted that you have an issue with. It is probably the malting method. The malting process involves steeping the barley in water before allowing it to germinate. Finally, this germinating barley is dried through the addition of heat. Traditionally the island of Islay produced the heat through the burning of peat due to the absence of trees to burn on the island. Barley would be laid out on a malting floor. The smoke from the heating process would permeate the barley. Burning peat produces a distinctive aroma and flavour. Peated single malt is a signature of Islay, but is not limited to it. Other distilleries produce peated whisky, however this is not the norm. I really like Ardbeg 10, but its not a whisky I would automatically give to a bourbon drinker looking to dip their toe into scotch. Neither is Ardbeg 10 typical of the flavour profile of the vast majority of scotch.
 

elessar

Part of the Furniture Now
Apr 24, 2019
667
1,398
As has been mentioned/ hinted at, Ardbeg is very far to one side of the scotch spectrum. It would be a pretty galvanizing intro to scotch. While I love the stuff (and have visited the distillery) it would be like giving someone Black XX Rope for their first pipe full of tobacco. I would suggest not writing off scotch all together yet, even if you do end up there. I would suggest Glenfiddich and Glenlivet to start (they are usually available in 50mL size too so you're not out much). I find they are pretty good entry points. If you continue your journey, you will find that some scotch is magnificent for it's subtlety and restraint while others stand out for their intense flavors. Do some research on the different scotch making regions. There are some underlying similarities that can help drive you towards flavor profiles you will groove on.
 

renfield

Lifer
Oct 16, 2011
4,428
33,504
Kansas
Elessar beat me to it. Don’t write off all scotches as being too peaty after trying Ardbeg. I’ll second the recommendation for Glenlivet.

For Irish I like Jameson.
 
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Puff nstuff

Starting to Get Obsessed
Dec 2, 2021
207
1,017
Inland Southern California
And, malting is a process that is not exclusive to barley, though for some reason it seems to be in the public mind. It's basically a way of increasing the available sugars in the grain by soaking, then drying/toasting. Most malted barley in Scotland is dried using peat, which impregnates the grains with that characteristic smokey flavor that the OP probably finds disagreeable. Here's a good article that both talks about malting and provides some good leads for Scotch whiskey that is not peaty.
 

Old_Newby

Part of the Furniture Now
Jan 1, 2022
520
1,319
Texas
Isn't that what Jack Daniels was invented for? lol

Seriously though, I suppose you tried both single malt and blended scotches?
Canadian whiskeys
Tennessee
Texas has some good whisky's coming out of the hill country
Yea being in Texas I have tried a few of the samples of Balcones and it’s ok. I plan to try Still Austin Cask Strength and Ironroot eventually.
 

Elric

Lifer
Sep 19, 2019
2,197
9,912
Liplapper Lane (Michigan)
tobaccocellar.com
Irish Whiskey is pretty much the only liquor I drink, along with a bit of bourbon. I'm no expert but I've listed a few I enjoy below. The parenthetical notations are in the event that there is more than one from that distiller.

Clontarf (1014)
Writer's Tears (Copper Pot)
The Quiet Man
Green Spot [Jameson distillate; also comes in older Blue, Red & Yellow]
The Dubliner (Bourbon Cask Aged)
Powers
Sexton (Single Malt)
Teeling
Slane
Tullamore Dew (Regular and Cider Cask Finish)
and the ubiqutous Jamesons :)
 

ADKPiper

Part of the Furniture Now
Dec 13, 2020
589
1,436
Adirondack Mountains
I've always operated on the assumption that the name in Irish Whiskey is....

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