Hal o' the Wynd - correct pronunciation and background

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craiginthecorn

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May 8, 2017
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Sugar Grove, IL, USA
During my current trip to the north and west of Scotland, I've noticed a number of streets named "Something Wynd". For example, yesterday in St. Andrews, I noticed this street sign:

A bit of research revealed that a Wynd is a short, often curvy street and is pronounced with a long "I", like "wined".
Hal o' the Wynd is named after a character from one of Sir Walter Scott’s “Waverley” novels. Hal o’ the Wynd is an alternative name for Henry Gow (Gow is the Gaelic equivalent of Smith) in “The Fair Maid of Perth.” He was a squat but powerfully built, prosperous blacksmith in Perth who was “known to Highland and Lowland as the best armourer that ever made sword and the truest soldier that ever drew one.”
Above description came from this article about an identically named steam locomotive.

 
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jaytex969

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Jun 6, 2017
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History and fact aside, I'm sure you've just provided many giddy moments of adolescent humor to those with interpretations of "butt wind"...


 

workman

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Jan 5, 2018
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So he was a back door man, which also relates to butt wind. Everything is connected, even the train, if you consider the scene from Shawshank Redemption, where chief warden Norton uses a wonderful train metaphor to explain to Dufresne how his butt will feel if he is put on duty down with "The Sisters".

 

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ericusrex

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Feb 27, 2015
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Interesting! I always thought it was a phoneticized (is that even a word?) “howl of the wind.” Like a blend for sailors and such.

 

jpmcwjr

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May 12, 2015
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Monterey Peninsula
Wind and wind! "A long and winding road" Now we know it's pronounced as in winding a watch, or as in The Beatles' song, it makes more sense.

 

snagstangl

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Jul 1, 2013
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I was in St. Andrews about 10 years ago and I remember laughing about that same sign!

 

bnichols23

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Mar 13, 2018
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Workman, the ONLY reasons I'm letting you by with that joke are because that's such a great movie & you spelled Dufresne right. I mean, here Craig is, trying to elevate the tone here & you're making Bob Gunton jokes. :twisted:

 

workman

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Jan 5, 2018
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Sorry if I caused any distress. I was actually under the impression that the wynd was something in the smithy. Even though I have been to Edinborough and have walked some wynds leading off The Mile. Wikipedia claims that the word wynd is of norse origin from the word venda, which means turn or to turn and still does in my language. So it all makes sense now.

How about the others, Old Gowrie and Brown Clunee. What do they mean?

 

jaytex969

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Jun 6, 2017
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I got your back, Anthony!
"Stand clear o' the Butt Wynde or ye may be doused in Brown Clunee..." :nana:


 

bnichols23

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Mar 13, 2018
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Hey, work', in order, I was just messing with you, & I Have No Earthly Idea!
And jay, thanks. Now ccw is gonna have to hose the deck down again. Good trainin'. :twisted:

 

bnichols23

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Mar 13, 2018
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BTW, speaking of Brown stuff,the other bad guy in that flick was Clancy Brown, so we've come full, er, circle, as it were. :mrgreen:

 

irishearl

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Aug 2, 2016
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Here's the poem in Scot about him http://www.williamsoutar.com/poems/hal.html

 
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