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Jul 26, 2021
2,129
8,805
Metro-Detroit
Food is a basic necessity and while some think food is merely fuel, I believe food to be so much more.

Cooking and eating are one of the few activities that involve all five senses. Likewise, food can invoke strong memories of the past while transcending time by having recipes passed down for generations.

I thought it would be interesting to share some family recipes. If the thread takes off, I will share some more of my own recipes.

Here is Amish's Roast Chicken with Au Jus recipe. It's a 4 ingredient recipe, not including salt, pepper, and garlic powder (which is optional).

Heavily sprinkle one whole chicken (or a package of chicken pieces, ideally with skin on) with more salt than you think necessary. Also sprinkle pepper and garlic powder (although not as heavy handed).

Place bird on cooking rack in a roasting pan and put in oven already preheated to 475. Cook until the internal temperature of the breast is 165, about 40 to 60 minutes (checking at 30 minutes and evey 10 minutes thereafter).

If the bird is getting burnt but not to temp, cover the bird with foil. Depending on how the bird is browning, you may need to rotate the roasting pan.

While bird roasts, put carton of chicken stock in sauce pan and add three sprigs of thyme (or about 1 tablespoon of dried thyme). Bring to rolling boil, then lower to a rapid simmer so that the stock reduces by about 1/3 as the chickenroasts. Do not season stock at this point.

When bird is done, let it rest for 10 minutes. While resting, rub entire bird with stick of butter (like corn on the cob). Place remaining stick of butter in the stock. Put bird on cutting board and drain pan drippings into stock (including the fond stuck to the pan). Taste stock and season with salt and pepper accordingly (since the drippings will be heavily seasoned).

Cut bird into either 4 or 8 pieces (depending on your preference). Plate and sauce bird. Serve and enjoy.

I typically serve this with sauted garlicky green beans and mashed potatoes. Sometimes I have either Dijon or Gulden's brown mustard on the side.
 

AJL67

Lifer
May 26, 2022
4,472
24,283
Florida - Space Coast
Growing up my mom used to make amazing beef stew which i might have eaten all the potatoes and meat chunks out of and sweet and sour cabbage that i might have eaten all the cabbage out of and left the "meatballs" that were in the cabbage. Sadly she was killed when i was a young teen and her recipes are no more, i've tried so many beef stew recipes on line and of course nothing was ever the same.

Who knows mb someone will post a recipe here that gets close!
 
Jul 26, 2021
2,129
8,805
Metro-Detroit
Growing up my mom used to make amazing beef stew which i might have eaten all the potatoes and meat chunks out of and sweet and sour cabbage that i might have eaten all the cabbage out of and left the "meatballs" that were in the cabbage. Sadly she was killed when i was a young teen and her recipes are no more, i've tried so many beef stew recipes on line and of course nothing was ever the same.

Who knows mb someone will post a recipe here that gets close!
What made the beef stew distinguishable from the norm? Maybe myself or another can assist.

It would be a shame to have certain recipes lost with a family member (which is one reason why I don't understand those that will not share or alter the shared recipe so the dish cannot be recreated).
 
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AJL67

Lifer
May 26, 2022
4,472
24,283
Florida - Space Coast
What made the beef stew distinguishable from the norm? Maybe myself or another can assist.

It would be a shame to have certain recipes lost with a family member (which is one reason why I don't understand those that will not share or alter the shared recipe so the dish cannot be recreated).
Most beef stews are more like beef soup, it has to have that clingy good reddish thickness to it! Other than that it's all about the seasoning which growing up dirt poor I'm guessing was just salt and pepper, a lot of beef stews are over seasoned with a bunch of herbs and things that actually take away from the beefy tomatoey goodness!
 
Jul 26, 2021
2,129
8,805
Metro-Detroit
Most beef stews are more like beef soup, it has to have that clingy good reddish thickness to it! Other than that it's all about the seasoning which growing up dirt poor I'm guessing was just salt and pepper, a lot of beef stews are over seasoned with a bunch of herbs and things that actually take away from the beefy tomatoey goodness!
Would the tomato beef stew be something like this (but without the herbs, and perhaps crushed tomatoes or a splash of red wine vinegar)?

 
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HawkeyeLinus

Lifer
Oct 16, 2020
5,544
40,670
Iowa
The basics of this recipe came from my Mom's nursing school roommate and lifelong friend. I love chili and make various kinds (and not going to argue about "real" chili and all of that - enjoy whatever variations you like) and honestly don't necessarily make even any particular kind the same way every time, I just start making it.

This is what I'd call chili for midwesterners who grew up thinking something like this is chili and therefore it is chili and I love it! It's not quite hers these days, but the revelation when I was a kid was the tomato soup and ketchup, lol.

Dice up a large yellow onion pretty fine and sauté gently with a little salt, pepper and chili powder, throw in some sliced jalapeños (from a jar so you get some of the juice - adds a little sweetness). Set aside.

Brown 2 lbs. ground chuck, seasoned with salt, pepper, chili powder (I use some a little more spicy but don't over do it, can always add later), cayenne, cumin (I like it in the chili but smells like people's butts in the jar, IMO). Mix a little bit of flour in with the beef when almost done and let that cook in well.

I think it's essential to cook in the seasonings with the onions and the beef instead of just dumping in later with the stock. More may be necessary when you taste it, but usually not once it all simmers together.

Toss the onion in. Add one can (no water) of Campbell's tomato soup concentrate. Add about 8 oz. ketchup (also adds a little sweetness). Sounds heretical but that's how she made it. Add a small can of black beans and a small can of chili beans (drain and rinse so as not to get the can juices but it's okay that the chili beans' sauce carries a little flavor), so the equivalent of one of those big fat cans, but I like the two different kinds of beans. If it doesn't look like enough beans, add another small can.

(If I want it a little smokier I'll toss one of those tiny little cans of Chipotle peppers with the adobo sauce in when the onions are pretty much cooked, but if I do that I'll add a little brown sugar, and won't add jalapeños).

Then enough no salt beef stock to cover it all and then simmer for a time and may add more beef stock depending on the consistency I want.

My wife isn't big on a lot of heat and my idea of heat to taste is a lot more than most I encounter so it's a compromise on the spiciness and I kind of know it when I see it as it all gets done. But no point losing flavors in the name of "spicy".

It is a little sweeter than a lot of chili recipes, but a nice mix of a little bit of sweet and spice.

975D904E-8281-4CA8-A8DC-82F46250B3CE.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Jul 26, 2021
2,129
8,805
Metro-Detroit
The basics of this recipe came from my Mom's nursing school roommate and lifelong friend. I love chili and make various kinds (and not going to argue about "real" chili and all of that - enjoy whatever variations you like) and honestly don't necessarily make even any particular kind the same way every time, I just start making it.

This is what I'd call chili for midwesterners who grew up thinking something like this is chili and therefore it is chili and I love it! It's not quite hers these days, but the revelation when I was a kid was the tomato soup and ketchup, lol.

Dice up a large yellow onion pretty fine and sauté gently with a little salt, pepper and chili powder, throw in some sliced jalapeños (from a jar so you get some of the juice - adds a little sweetness). Set aside.

Brown 2 lbs. ground chuck, seasoned with salt, pepper, chili powder (I use some a little more spicy but don't over do it, can always add later), cayenne, cumin (I like it in the chili but smells like people's butts in the jar, IMO). Mix a little bit of flour in with the beef when almost done and let that cook in well.

I think it's essential to cook in the seasonings with the onions and the beef instead of just dumping in later with the stock. More may be necessary when you taste it, but usually not once it all simmers together.

Toss the onion in. Add one can (no water) of Campbell's tomato soup concentrate. Add about 8 oz. ketchup (also adds a little sweetness). Sounds heretical but that's how she made it. Add a small can of black beans and a small can of chili beans (drain and rinse so as not to get the can juices but it's okay that the chili beans' sauce carries a little flavor), so the equivalent of one of those big fat cans, but I like the two different kinds of beans. If it doesn't look like enough beans, add another small can.

(If I want it a little smokier I'll toss one of those tiny little cans of Chipotle peppers with the adobo sauce in when the onions are pretty much cooked, but if I do that I'll add a little brown sugar, and won't add jalapeños).

Then enough no salt beef stock to cover it all and then simmer for a time and may add more beef stock depending on the consistency I want.

My wife isn't big on a lot of heat and my idea of heat to taste is a lot more than most I encounter so it's a compromise on the spiciness and I kind of know it when I see it as it all gets done. But no point losing flavors in the name of "spicy".

It is a little sweeter than a lot of chili recipes, but a nice mix of a little bit of sweet and spice.

View attachment 219140
Thank you.

I'm always looking for a chili recipe and tend to always end up with a large pot of it even when trying to watch portioning.
 
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