Dating a Savinelli Pipe.

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J. B. Deller

Might Stick Around
Mar 17, 2023
52
87
Is it possible to find out what year a particular Savinelli Pipe was made? Is there a date code, particular stamp, lettering style, etc. that would enable you to find out the year of manufacture?
 

J. B. Deller

Might Stick Around
Mar 17, 2023
52
87
I'm glad that you're finding value in this forum. I'm still testing the waters here myself, ha ha.

I need to expand my post... you can also figure out dates for limited release pipes like Halloween pipes, Christmas pipes and such also.
Thanks. The reason I asked this question is because I found a Savinelli estate pipe at my local tobacconist that I’m thinking of purchasing. It has the number 114 on the bottom.
 
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fightnhampster

Part of the Furniture Now
Aug 14, 2019
921
2,568
Indiana
In the early stages of dating any pipe, I would recommend lively conversation, a nice drink and an expensive, well aged tobacco. Maybe even light jazz in the background.

After you get to know each other, you can skip the conversation and go straight for the cheaper blends.

Never Latakia on a first date.
 

ParkitoATL

Can't Leave
Mar 11, 2023
355
1,369
Atlanta, GA
I am trying to date a Savinelli Dry System 1611. I found some info that the old 3 digit vs 4 digit code dating does NOT apply to the Dry System. However, I see lots of Dry System 2611 pipes around (same bent Dublin shape) but few 1611 pipes. I also see references on the Savinelli web site to the "New Dry System" with the four digit codes beginning with 2***.

There is nothing mentioned to designate any improvements to the "New Dry System." I assume that the 1*** codes are older than the 2*** codes, but I have no idea as to date, other than the Wesleys site which says the SDS started in 1981, and lists several of the 1*** series as "Old Dry System."
 
Last edited:

mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
41,210
60,470
fightnhamster beat me to it. Whenever I ask a Savinelli for a date it says yes.

I've always hoped to get factory pipe makers to add at least the year of manufacture to their stamps, but there are standard reasons they don't do that, mainly that it dates the pipe and might make it harder to sell them as new.

Some artisans and a rare few factory pipe makers etch or stamp the year on their pipes. Luciano pipes stamped all its pipes with the year, for which I commend them. I'm not sure they still make pipes, but theirs was a nobel cause.

My home state N.C. pipe carver Jerry Perry has always etched the year of a pipe on the briar. He's just a superior guy. My first pipe from him is 2002, still beautiful and going strong, carved of pure N.C. Mountain Laurel.
 

ParkitoATL

Can't Leave
Mar 11, 2023
355
1,369
Atlanta, GA
I am trying to date a Savinelli Dry System 1611. I found some info that the old 3 digit vs 4 digit code dating does NOT apply to the Dry System. However, I see lots of Dry System 2611 pipes around (same bent Dublin shape) but few 1611 pipes. I also see references on the Savinelli web site to the "New Dry System" with the four digit codes beginning with 2***.
Made a mistake here. All of the "New Dry System" pipes have 3 digit codes on the Savvy site.

The Wesleys site has "Old Dry System" listed as 1***, 2***, and 3***. Now I'm really confused!
 

ParkitoATL

Can't Leave
Mar 11, 2023
355
1,369
Atlanta, GA
My home state N.C. pipe carver Jerry Perry has always etched the year of a pipe on the briar. He's just a superior guy. My first pipe from him is 2002, still beautiful and going strong, carved of pure N.C. Mountain Laurel.
As an ATLien with deep connections to NC, I have to learn about this N.C. Mountain Laurel pipe! Can you post photos? How does it smoke?
 

mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
41,210
60,470
ParkitoATL, I'm not good at photo posting, so I apologize for that, but I can tell you that Mountain Laurel has a bright finish with stain, slightly more matte than most briar finishes, and large somewhat muted grain. But it is attractive, relatively light weight, extremely durable, and equal to briar in its insulating properties.

Dr. Grabow moved to Sparta, N.C. from Chicago when briar became scarce during World War Two, because most of the briar areas were embattled. So Dr. Grabow wanted to be close to the Mountain Laurel supply for their pipes. Now of course they are back to briar, but staying in Sparta, close to the Virginia line in N.C. and westerly in the state.

Currently, I know of only the one pipe carver, Jerry Perry of Colfax, N.C., who works in Mountain Laurel, as well as briar, maple, and the occasional exotic wood, like a pocket pipe I have made of cocobolo.

Jerry does not sell online, although I think he does pipe repair online. To buy his pipes, you have to go his stand in The Village of Yesteryear at the N.C. State Fair in Raleigh, where he does a brisk business, or if the pipe club TAPS ever resumes its pipe show, also at the Fairgrounds but in April, Jerry also has sold there.

Jerry explained that he didn't sell online because then he would spend all his time taking photos rather than carving pipes.