Cavendish Blend Question

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clynch

Can't Leave
Feb 3, 2013
358
857
Pensacola Florida
I look at Blends and I see Cavendish and Burley. Cavendish and Virginia. Light Cavendish, Dark Cavandish and ... . Per wikipedia Cavendish can be burley or virginia. The tobacco is heat treated with fire or steam and then put under heavy pressure to bring out the sugars. Some Cavandish may also have flavorings or toppings. With that in mind a Cavandish Virginia blend could be ALL virginia if the cavandish was made from virginia. I need to ask, is cavandish such a major modification to tobacco that if comprised of all burley it won't be called burley anymore? Its called cavendish? Cavandish became a leaf in and of itself?? Could I then surmise cavandish could taste like almost anything if it still retains any taste of its original leaf? I hope I worded this right. Knowing what a blend is, could mean little in its taste. Something that simply states "dark cavandish" could taste like anything so it means nothing except we expect some sweet. Do I got this right?
 
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Ocam

Starting to Get Obsessed
Sep 4, 2020
145
312
Spain
Both taste, aroma and smoking qualities change very much from the original leaf which it's made with, so it makes sense to me that it is considered a different component on its own. And yes, cavendish changes a lot depending on its original leaf, so I guess it's just up to the blender to decide which one to use (i really don't think they make more than one type of Cavendish for their blends).
 
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anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
13,134
24,609
44
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
yeah I think of it almost like caramelizing the tobacco. And yeah it changes not just the profile but other things like the smoke actually looks more floofy and has more body. It also blandifies it enough to make it better at carrying other flavors. I guess one way to look at it and the way it works would be to compare it to types of sugar in food. They might all be different but will have the same general effect in most recipes. Like honey and beet sugar are different things but they'll general do the same thing added to another food. Or at least that is how I look at cavendish.
 
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