Pipes Magazine » Pipe Tobacco Discussion

Search Forums  
   
Tags:   

Sam Gawith History

(31 posts)
  1. crpntr1

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 2,040

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    SG has become one of my favorite blenders, with Squadron Leader and FVF at the top of the list.
    Earlier in the week, while reading the history section of their website, http://www.samuelgawith.co.uk/default.asp?PageId=4 ,
    I began to wonder, they still use a few pieces of equipment that was almost antique when they opened shop in the late 1700s...how old are some of these SG blends that I like so well??
    I know Grousemoor is one of the original blends, but what else did they make 200+ years ago??
    Anyone here know?
    I emailed them, but have yet to get a response...

    The most important things in life are good friends and a good bullpen...not necessarily in that order

    You may all go to hell, I'll go to Texas-Davy Crockett
    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. rickpal14

    rickpal14

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 1,486

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Commonwealth is one of my favs and that is a blend that is also +200 years old.

    Proud Member of the BlackBlood Society...........
    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,063

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Unlike other "old standbys," (Dunhill comes to mind), which have changed ownership, and/or often kept the blend's name but have changed slightly or almost completely, Samuel Gawith blends are all exactly the same now as the day the blends were first created.

    I think most SG blends have been around 200 years or more. Grousemoor as mentioned by the OP, Full Virginia Flake, the Ropes and 1792, for example.

    Here in the USA, some house blends are also exactly the same as when they were created a considerably long time ago. L.J. Peretti, Iwan Ries, and McCranie's come to mind.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. sparroa

    simenon

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,333

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I know for sure that Sam's Flake, St James Flake, Chocolate Flake, and a few more are of very recent origin - the 2000s I believe...

    I was not aware of Samuel Gawith before 2008 so I don't personally remember when they were introduced.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,639

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I never looked into this, but I am glad you brought up the topic Chris! 1792 is a top fav of mine and now I am curious...

    "Be seeing you"


    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. judcole

    Jud

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 3,764

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    1792 Flake used to be called Cob Flake, iirc.

    Thought in the early morning, solace in time of woes,
    Peace in the hush of the twilight, balm ere my eyelids close
    Rudyard Kipling
    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. crpntr1

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 2,040

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    So rothnh, FVF and the others you mentioned were in their original line back in 1795
    And if they've never changed...that's cool
    If/when they respond to my email with the actual line offered back then, I'll post it

    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,639

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    So rothnh, FVF and the others you mentioned were in their original line back in 1795
    And if they've never changed...that's cool

    That to me is very remarkable. Looking forward to any reply you get Chris.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,063

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I'm thinking what I've stated is correct, AFAIK, but of course I'm not staking my life on that. I, too, am interested in what SG tells you in their reply to your query, Chris.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. papipeguy

    papipeguy

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2010
    Posts: 8,701

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I've written to them brfore and they are quick to reply. Let us know what they say.

    Blowin' smoke since 1970.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. weezell

    weezell

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2011
    Posts: 3,533

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    MMmmmmm....1792.....

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 1,829

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    1792 is the year that equipment for making snuff was brought from Glasgow to Kendal by another Kendal native (not Gawith). Basically, that year marks the beginning of the manufacture of tobacco products in Kendal. 1792 Flake was a later invention, but how much later is open to question -- maybe the email from SG will provide a definitive answer.

    BTW, does anyone know what the heck is used to flavor Grousemoor? Weird stuff.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. sparroa

    simenon

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,333

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    People on TR say lemongrass is one of the flavour notes in Grousemoor but that doesn't mean its an ingredient. I never tried the stuff myself.

    As well, I can't remember where I read it (maybe Christian Pipe Smokers forum) but a well informed member there seemed to believe that Full Virginia Flake was also of more recent origin. More of a modern take on Virginias than the ropes and such, probably aiming for the export market...

    You'll have to rely on Samuel Gawith themselves for the best info!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. pstlpkr

    Lawrence

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2009
    Posts: 10,231

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Hey Pitchfork,

    BTW, does anyone know what the heck is used to flavor Grousemoor? Weird stuff.

    I believe it to be lemon grass.

    Here's some horn toot'n: Samuel Gawith Grousemoor


    "Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put." Winston Churchill
    View Lawrence  Whitcomb's profile on LinkedIn
    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 1,829

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks, Lawrence! I've read that review before. So is it really flavored with lemongrass? That's wild. I also posted on the "Grousemoor" thread last night. I tried it dried out a bit in a larger bowl (Peterson Lovat) and it was fantastic -- snow, ice and 45mph winds notwithstanding. Truly wonderful stuff. I'm on the fence at this point as to whether I like Grousemoor better or Ennerdale. Not that anyone has to choose, of course.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. sparroa

    simenon

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 1,333

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    1792 definitely has an old school taste, even if it is far younger than the name implies.

    I wish they made another tonquin flake with just as much sauce but half the nicotine...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. joeahearn

    joeahearn

    Member
    Joined: Nov 2012
    Posts: 294

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I agree with you, simenon. i like the taste of 1792, but the nicotine is too strong for me to smoke much at all.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. kris

    kris

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 446

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That article doesn't mention that only a few years ago all the staff that actually make the baccy (of which there were very few) were in a syndicate that won the lottery.

    And they all quit.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,063

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    This Lottery, Kris? http://www.biglotterywinners.com/2009/09/kendal-lotto-winner-graham-forrest.html

    This article (2009) states that the winners were two -- Graham Forrest, a directing manager at Samuel Gawith and his wife -- and Mr. Forrest said, at the time, he had no intention to leave SG.

    Has he since left SG? Just curious.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. rmbittner

    rmbittner

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2012
    Posts: 2,181

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Chris:

    Pipes & Tobaccos magazine did a profile on Samuel Gawith in issue 2, volume 4. That's one I don't have in my own collection, but someone else here might be able to hook you up with a JPEG of the article.

    Back issues are available for sale on the P&T site. Just be aware that they don't make it easy to find what you're looking for: the subject index says the article was in volume 4, issue number 2. But when you go to order a back issue, they're only shown by publication dates -- not volumes and numbers.To make things worse, their vol/no system seems a bit quirky: Spring 1998 is Vol. 3, No. 1; Spring 1999 is Vol. 4, No. 4. Since this is a quarterly publication, there are only three issues between those two, so I don't have a clue how they came up with this.

    You'll likely hear back from Samuel Gawith before you can figure out the right issue to look for!

    Bob

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. cajundad

    cajundad

    Senior Member
    Joined: Nov 2012
    Posts: 478

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    +1 , I love commonwealth as well . I just brought a tin with me , to The Old Cajuns , He liked it as well . I was told it was an old blend .

    "A pipe is the fountain of contemplation, the source of pleasure, the companion of the wise; and the man who smokes, thinks like a philosopher and acts like a Samaritan."
    -Edward George Bulwer-Lytton, 1st Baron Lytton
    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. crpntr1

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 2,040

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for that Bob
    I've yet to hear from them but I'm still hoping to

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. mluyckx

    Belgian Mick

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 2,067

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    It's dead-quiet-time in Europe this time of year. Everybody takes time off.

    But yeah, I'm interested in the answer too

    "The fact is, squire, the moment a man takes to a pipe, he becomes a philosopher. It's the poor man's friend; it calms the mind, soothes the temper, and makes a man patient under difficulties. It has made more good men, good husbands, kind masters, indulgent fathers, than any other blessed thing on this universal earth."
    -"Sam Slick, the clockmaker" aka T.C.Haliburton
    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. crpntr1

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 2,040

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I thought that might be the case mick...I'll post soon as I get a response

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. crpntr1

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 2,040

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Update: I got a reply last night, it didn't completely answer my question but did shed some light
    I'm hoping to get an actual list but dont plan to prod too much
    the email I got was this

    Dear Sir

    When SG was formed in 1792, the original lines were of snuff.

    SG introduced tobaccos to the market sometime about 1830 – 1840, nobody is sure about the actual date. 1792 was an original but was marketed as a plug, which was a popular way of using pipe tobacco then. It was introduced as Cob. We changed the name of the flake to 1792 in about 2000, the plug still bears the name “Cob”.

    Full Virginia and SQL was introduced in about 1925, so they are youngsters so to speak.

    Hopefully there's more to come tonight

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,639

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the update Chris - I am staying tuned...

    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. misterlowercase

    misterlowercase

    Minister of Tobacciana
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 1,932

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Interesting stuff & nice reporting, thanks!

    I'm sure this has been posted before, but these tour pix are awesome:
    http://rinconpipa.foroactivo.com/t3239-samuel-gawith-reportaje-fotografico-de-marcelino-piquero
    &
    http://lohandbehold.com/2011/03/17/samuel-gawith-factory-visit/

    A few notes to be found here:
    http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=024-wdb14&cid=-1#-1
    where we find this:
    "Machinery, implements, etc. of business valued at £13,160.19s.9d in 1865"

    Also I've been meaning to get this book as it looks like a corker, although it may be more snuff than pipe tobak related, it still might fill in some historical gaps...
    http://www.pfeife-tabak.de/Artikel/Verschiedenes/Kendal%20Brown%20House/KendalBrown.htm

    Thanks again for your update!!!

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. crpntr1

    Chris

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2011
    Posts: 2,040

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    @misterlowercase thanks for the links, very interesting stuff

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. rlunderhill

    rlunderhill

    Senior Member
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 432

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks for the URL to Tobacco Reviews. I never seen this one before. Great information.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 1,829

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Thanks to Chris and misterlowercase. Great information and links.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  31. sherlock

    sherlock

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2011
    Posts: 512

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    This is a really interesting thread. I didn't realized how old Sg was, just makes me like it more.

    Posted 1 year ago #

Reply

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   drennan, eightywon, lincolnsbark