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Magic eraser issues

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    bbc417

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    Just used a magic eraser to get a ton of build up off the rim of an estate pipe my GF bought me (I watched a youtube video where someone recommended it- worked well for him)… while all the carbon buildup did come off with time, so did some of the stain- which is now a lighter brown than the rest of the pipe. Any tips???

    Posted 3 years ago #
  2. tobyducote

    NOLA Cajun

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    Don't do it agin...magic erasers are for oxidized stems...not the pipe itself..for carbon on the rim...use q-tips and saliva...

    Posted 3 years ago #
  3. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    I find that saliva and a bit of thumb pressure removes a fair amount of residue on the rim.

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  4. danielplainview

    dave g

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    Depending on how hard you scrubbed, you may not have removed the stain but just removed the wax. When the wax is removed, the stain will appear lighter than the waxed portion of the pipe. A picture would be helpful for recommending a solution.

    Make aromatics great again.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  5. mikestanley

    mikestanley

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    Try a little shoe polish. Should work fine .
    Mike S.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. blackbeard

    Tyler

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    Depending on how hard you scrubbed, you may not have removed the stain but just removed the wax. When the wax is removed, the stain will appear lighter than the waxed portion of the pipe. A picture would be helpful for recommending a solution.

    Listen to dave g - reading his posts/seeing what he can do I would trust a priceless pipe to him.

    Who is John Galt?
    Posted 3 years ago #
  7. warren

    warren

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    Yup, a bit of spit and my thumb seem to do well at keeping the carbon at bay.

    A man without a shillelagh is a man without an expedient.
    Posted 3 years ago #
  8. skraps

    skrapsoftobacco

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    A wise old sage, once mentioned that black coffee works wonders on carbon buildup. I can attest, and IMO works even better than saliva. YMMV.

    "People are not made better by a briar. An idiot before smoking a pipe is still an idiot after smoking a pipe, they're just more likely to speak less drivel with something in their mouth. For that, all society should be grateful."

    - Bob Runowski
    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. peckinpahhombre

    peckinpahhombre

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    On my rims I use a blow torch to soften up the char and then go to town with some 80 grit sandpaper.

    Posted 3 years ago #
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    elpfeife

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    No wonder you keep buying new pipes.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    If you're going to top a pipe as Peck suggests, it's quicker using a bandsaw, freehand; it's just not right to use a guide or template. Then the 80 grit to soften the hard edges, then the blowtorch to darken the fresh cuts.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  12. skraps

    skrapsoftobacco

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    On my rims I use a blow torch to soften up the char and then go to town with some 80 grit sandpaper.

    How does your proctologist feel about this?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  13. jkrug

    jkrug

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    On my rims I use a blow torch to soften up the char and then go to town with some 80 grit sandpaper.

    Note to self: refrain from sending pipes to peck for restoration!!

    Posted 3 years ago #
  14. okiescout

    okiescout

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    How does your proctologist feel about this?

    He claims the texture is somewhat crunchy!

    "Work as if you were to live a hundred years. Pray as if you were to die tomorrow."
    Benjamin Franklin
    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. captainprophesy

    captainprophesy

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    As others have said... Spit and finger is all you need.

    and you can take THAT to your proctologist!

    I carry a gun... because a cop is too heavy!
    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. pruss

    pruss

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    Putting aside blow torches and ass doctors...

    While I agree with Dave that it's possible you just removed wax, I think it's equally possible that you pulled stain with your magic eraser.

    As others have mentioned, a magic eraser is an abrasive and will remove material. I have seen it posited on other forums that magic erasers generally work out to an equivalent of 3600 grit wet sandpaper... but that can vary widely depending on how wet the magic eraser is and how much elbow grease is used. For these reasons I only use magic erasers to remove oxidation from vulcanite stems, and for cleaning up acrylic stems.

    I've found that the simplest way to remove smoke and tar build-up from the smooth rim of a pipe bowl is to stand the bowl rim down in distilled water for about two minutes. After standing just the rim in water I use a cotton lint-free cloth (like a kitchen towel or tea towel) to wipe away the tars and oils. Wash rinse and repeat until complete.

    If you want to bring the top of the rim back to the same colour as the rest of your pipe you could do the following:
    1) Wipe the exterior of the stummel down with 99% isopropyl alcohol to remove oils, stains, and wax
    2) Using a VERY LIGHT tint of aniline dye mixed with 99% isopropyl alcohol, tint the pipe such that the rim top blends with the stummel.
    3) Buff the pipe with a dunhill pipe wipe, or with a wheel and carnauba wax.

    Matching stain colour is a bit tricky at first. I generally use Fiebing's light brown or dark brown starting with two drops of dye to one eye dropper of isopropyl alcohol.

    You can, of course, leave the rim lighter colour than the rest of the pipe. This is an aesthetic choice. The rim will darken over time as you smoke the pipe. But it might be off-colour from the rest of the stummel for quite a while... or forever.

    -- Pat

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. warren

    warren

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    Pruss: Ever the voice of reason. However, if you had been the first to respond to the post the rest of us would have had nothing cogent to add. That in itself might be a good thing.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  18. pruss

    pruss

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    Pruss: Ever the voice of reason. However, if you had been the first to respond to the post the rest of us would have had nothing cogent to add. That in itself might be a good thing.

    Why do you think I waited a day?

    -- Pat

    Posted 3 years ago #
  19. aristokles

    aristokles

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    I would say that the warnings above are accurate. However I have used a Magic Eraser on a couple of very old Custombilt pipes I inherited from my father which were so well used that the "patia", so to speak - hand oils and other tarry leavings on the briar - had darkened to almost sheer black with no discernible grain showing. The cleaning pad made short work of cleaning the rim and the rest of the pipes to the point that the pipes now are greatly improved.
    I did have to spend considerable effort reapplying surface oils back onto the pipes - countering somewhat that which I achieved. I do not regret the exercise.

    I have not done this to a similarly aged vintage Barling's Make pipe I also inherited. I am not quite that crazy.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. pruss

    pruss

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    I would say that the warnings above are accurate. However I have used a Magic Eraser on a couple of very old Custombilt pipes I inherited from my father which were so well used that the "patia", so to speak - hand oils and other tarry leavings on the briar - had darkened to almost sheer black with no discernible grain showing. The cleaning pad made short work of cleaning the rim and the rest of the pipes to the point that the pipes now are greatly improved.
    I did have to spend considerable effort reapplying surface oils back onto the pipes - countering somewhat that which I achieved. I do not regret the exercise.

    I'm glad that your process delivered good results for you. I have to think that a cotton makeup remover pad and isopropyl alcohol would have made shorter work of the oils and tars without removing material and leaving most of the original stain with only a need for adding wax.

    YMMV

    -- Pat

    Posted 3 years ago #
  21. aristokles

    aristokles

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    Yeah, pruss, one would have thought that. Of course I tried that before along with several other solvents such as mineral spirits. None worked. I am glad you are pleased with my success. Sometimes insanity is its own reward.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  22. pruss

    pruss

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    Of course I tried that before along with several other solvents such as mineral spirits. None worked. I am glad you are pleased with my success. Sometimes insanity is its own reward.

    I've had good luck with acetone so long as you're happy pulling stain. Makes me scared to think what caused the stains if sanding was the only recourse.

    Congrats again on gettin' 'er done.

    -- Pat

    Posted 3 years ago #
  23. aristokles

    aristokles

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    I had no stain issues; hence no need for acetone. The erasers came away BLACK from tars, not brown from stain. I have used this on a Stanwell Design Choice as well (smoking it right now). NO issues once a little walnut oil was applied.

    I noted no "sanding" effect whatsoever. If it was there it was so miniscule as to be unremarkable.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  24. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    What happens if you use Murphy's oil soap? Or simple green and a soft rag? Or just dish detergent such as Dawn? j

    Posted 3 years ago #
  25. pruss

    pruss

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    What happens if you use Murphy's oil soap? Or simple green and a soft rag? Or just dish detergent such as Dawn? j

    I use Murphy's on rusticated and blasted pipes that are super cruddy... I have also used it on plateau tops that are caked on with tars. In these instances I also use tooth brushes. I have a friend who uses a brass bristle white-wall brush for plateau. Once the tars have been cleaned off I use a liberal amount of water to remove the murphy's. This will also pull stain from the high-points of the plateau/blast/rustication.

    I can't speak to simple green.

    -- Pat

    Posted 3 years ago #
  26. brass

    brass

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    I read a preventive tip on the site that I found useful. To PREVENT rim darkening, moisten the rim with a a little saliva before lighting. I also try to use a napkin or piece of paper, moistened with saliva, to clean the rim after each smoke. I've have had pipes for a year that look almost new, using these two tips.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  27. hooboy

    hooboy

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    This topic reminds me of what my ol' Grandpappy told me long ago.
    In selecting a protolgist as well as a girlfriend pick ones with the smallest hands !
    The first makes the exam less painful and the 2nd it makes things look bigger!
    Still trying to figure out what he meant!
    hoo-boy

    I feel strongly BOTH ways!
    Posted 3 years ago #
  28. ejames

    ejames

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    What happens if you use Murphy's oil soap? Or simple green and a soft rag? Or just dish detergent such as Dawn? j

    I use Murphy's on rusticated and blasted pipes that are super cruddy... I have also used it on plateau tops that are caked on with tars. In these instances I also use tooth brushes. I have a friend who uses a brass bristle white-wall brush for plateau. Once the tars have been cleaned off I use a liberal amount of water to remove the murphy's. This will also pull stain from the high-points of the plateau/blast/rustication.

    I can't speak to simple green.

    -- Pat

    I have also used Murphy's to clean rusticated pipes,works great. Recently I tried some brushes I bought on Ebay. Works great and no soap and water involved. Here's a link to a post I did about them on the DGCF--
    http://drgrabows.myfreeforum.org/about7284.html

    To clean smooth rims I use an Exacto knife to remove most of the build up then spit on a Q-tip. The rotary brushes work great to clean plateau or rusticated rims,although heavy deposits of crud may need to be worked by hand first.

    Posted 3 years ago #

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