Pipes Magazine » General Pipe Smoking Discussion

Search Forums  
   
Tags:   

Has Peterson Quality Really Declined?

(203 posts)
  1. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    On another thread, someone noticed that estate Petersons, like the humble Donegal Rocky line, were selling at prices close to the price of a new pipe from the same line. In response, rothnh wrote:

    Today's Peterson Donegal is, IMO, a shadow of it's former self and very much inferior so it would be logical, and expected, for older Donegals, a much better pipe, to at times go for more than a new one.

    Has anyone else noticed a dramatic decline in quality? I own two Peterson pipes -- one is a Donegal Rocky I bought a couple of months ago. Mine is absolutely fine, but the briar isn't nearly as sweet or dry-smoking as my older Peterson Kenmare. I assumed the difference was a matter of one finish (the Kenmare) being slightly more expensive than the other, but perhaps no.

    I'm curious to hear what others have noticed regarding Peterson quality.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  2. mrenglish

    mrenglish

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 2,303

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Overall, I think they have. Mainly due to engineering issues and their increased demand. I picked up a Kapp Royale and the bowl was deeper than the draft hole. For a supposed higher end pipe of theirs, I was a bit disappointed. I've had a few other issues like the stem not being bent correctly on a 01 shape and a XL106 that looked like part of the bowl was cut off. When you look at it from the front, there is a nice straight cut at an angle where there should have been a nice rounding.

    That said, I have learned to ask lots of questions if buying online. I've been on a Peterson binge this year and by far, they have been the easiest I have ever broken in. With the exception of two Kapet's I bought that needed the stain removed, I have not had any issues breaking any of them in. I tend to get more gurgle than other pipes and this (I believe) is due to the gap between the tenon and the briar. Something about how they are mostly drilled for a 9mm filter but adapted for the American market.

    Very few of the bent pipes I have checked out will pass a pipe cleaner, so if I want a bent, its either a military bit or system pipe. I would definitely purchase another, in fact I am getting an ebony 317 system later today.

    Their bowls are not turned at the factory, but rather in Italy where they source their briar from, then finished at their factory. Demand is way up which is why I think they are having quality issues, that and too many different lines of pipes.

    Michael
    Posted 6 years ago #
  3. yaboofive

    Richard Gonzalez

    Member
    Joined: Jan 2010
    Posts: 190

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I agree, it is hard to find a New Peterson without some engineering flaw, that being said I do have an emerald with an off center draft hole that I use at work as my thinking pipe that smokes better than some of my finer pipes... Life is sometimes funny that way.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  4. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Look, I'm a huge Peterson fan -- in fact I have more Petersons than any other brand in my collection. But my newest Peterson is hallmarked 1979.

    if you want a really nice Pete under $150, buy an estate and even then, obviously, some serious homework is required. Personally, I'd do that > retail new and I'd shop the estate market, not from eBay, but from respected on line vendors I trust. That said, if I were going to buy a brand new Peterson ( love the Mark Twain poker and the Sherlock Holmes briars & the meerschaums), the MSRP would be well over $200.

    I assumed the difference was a matter of one finish (the Kenmare) being slightly more expensive than the other, but perhaps no.

    New low to mid price Petes are too often a disaster. If anyone has got a burning desire to buy one, do so from a B&M and check the pipe out carefully. If you feel lucky, go with an on line vendor only after you ask a lot of questions (drilling, finish, etc.) and request more photos of the actual pipe.

    Their bowls are not turned at the factory, but rather in Italy where they source their briar from, then finished at their factory.

    Briar is from Italy, but the pipe bowls on the low to mid range Petes are turned in Spain, actually.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  5. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Perhaps I got lucky with the drilling on my Donegal Rocky lovat, but it's perfectly straight and the draft is much nicer than on my other Pete -- I only had to open it up a little bit to get it the way I like it.

    Too bad about the quality control issues others have seen. Again, it seems I got lucky.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  6. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My newest Peterson is actually a Peterson Donegal lovat hallmarked 1979. It has a silver band (new ones have a nickel band). I got it from Marty Pulver, in perfect condition, for $45. The photo of my pipe (marked sold of course) is still on his website.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  7. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,695

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    This topic arises every so often, and I hope the Peterson people take notice.

    Here's my two cents... I don't think the fit and finish of Peterson's has gone down in quality so much as I think their manufacturing methods need improving.

    I bought a $70 Aran and the fit and finish is excellent. However, break-in was a b*tch. Gave a bitter taste to the tobacco for way longer than any of my other pipes. Now however, it smokes very well and it's a handsome pipe. Their higher priced pipes I hear don't have this problem.

    In this interview, Managing Dir at Peterson Tom Palmer says they cork the pipes before dip staining and says this should fix the problem. My guess is, either they're not corking the pipes on a consistent basis or they're doing a poor job of it.

    http://btheinternationalpetersonpipeclub.runboard.com/t262

    I think it comes down to style. As much as I like Peterson's, if I had to choose between a $70 Stanwell or Sav and a $70 Peterson (and all 3 were equal in looks and appearance), I'd probably not choose the Peterson. Still, there are some Peterson models that are just gorgeous and I'd be willing to put up with the longer break-in.

    "Be seeing you"


    Posted 6 years ago #
  8. sasquatch

    sasquatch

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 934

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I went to a "Peterson Night" at a local pipe club last year. I was totally ready to buy a pipe, cash in hand. And I looked and looked and looked, and not a single pipe there out of about 40 or 50 pipes was without some significant flaw. Crooked or loose metal work, poorly bent stems, poor drilling, terrible sanding and finish on the smooth pipes - even the Year pipe had sanding scratches near the shank, and this new "dipped in liquid plastic" finish (I assume it's an acrylic resin) looks awful, imho.

    So to me, it's a brand that needs some help in the QC department. I've got a couple GREAT Peterson pipes, but looking at what I saw last year.... I won't have any more, not new ones, anyway. For 100 or 150 bucks, I can get a really solid pipe out of Italy. Right now, I'd say Savinelli's quality/dollar is higher.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  9. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Sasquatch wrote:

    I looked and looked and looked, and not a single pipe there out of about 40 or 50 pipes was without some significant flaw. Crooked or loose metal work, poorly bent stems, poor drilling, terrible sanding and finish on the smooth pipes - even the Year pipe had sanding scratches near the shank[.]

    Wow, that's pretty serious. I bought my Peterson 53 from smokingpipes and apparently they send pipes back to the manufacturer when they're not up to snuff. Like I said, the one I have is fine.

    Even still, I was disappointed with the rustication Peterson uses on the bowls. It's like the stummel was held up to a wood chipper or something. The result is very rough and not nearly as deep as you would like. Strangely, the rustication on the shank seems to be more traditional and perhaps done by hand. Is the wood chipper finish a new thing for the Donegal Rocky line, or has it always been that way?

    Posted 6 years ago #
  10. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    OK, this is really strange. I just checked out the Petersons on smokingpipes and most of the Donegal Rockys and Kapets have really nice rustication -- very much unlike my 53 with the wood chipper finish. Check out these two Kapets and you can see the difference clear as day. Good rustication first, wood chipper finish second:

    Posted 6 years ago #
  11. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,695

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I looked and looked and looked, and not a single pipe there out of about 40 or 50 pipes was without some significant flaw.

    Seriously? That is much worse than I would have expected. 'Tis a shame.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  12. mrenglish

    mrenglish

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 2,303

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    [Briar is from Italy, but the pipe bowls on the low to mid range Petes are turned in Spain, actually]

    Cool, thanks for that information, rotnh.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  13. rd02sir

    CanAsianPiper

    Senior Member
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 441

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    i bought a system standard 314 from Peterson of Dublin in Dublin. I'm over all impressed with the quality of the pipe. Maybe they have higher standards for their store front, but have yet to have any problems with it.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  14. deleon

    deleon

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 609

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I have a few Peterson pipes and luckliy I've seen nothing wrong with any of mine in design, maybe I've been lucky but it does make you think twice about buying online unlesss you see somewhere online next to the picture you're looking that you're getting the pipe shown in the image.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  15. taerin

    Eric

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 1,927

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My first Peterson System Standard, and had to return it because a chunk of the bowl the size of one of my entire fingertip of my pinky was chewed off by what looked like a woodchuck or some other rodent (from Iwan Ries, didn't even bother to look at it before shipping, like I asked). So he sent me another one, this one was missing the band! Come to find out Peterson misdrilled it so much, the band did not match the stem and ended up getting caught on it, hence why it came off. So I am done with Iwan Ries, the guy just doesn't make sure the pipes are in good shape even when asked, even after the first time a problem came up!

    I now turned to Ebay, got one from a highly reputable seller. It's band was also misdrilled and deeply gouged the stem upon removal! I sent it back and turn to yet another Ebayer, on my fourth try I settled with one that had a rim that was not round (jagged) and 6+ fills with some very large noticable ones. The briar itself also feels very cheap. It's band was also not drilled quite right, so the stem must be very carefully removed to avoid gouging it on the metal band which protrudes into the stem area. My thoughts were, it was not going to get better than this and I was like $30 into shipping costs on an entry level pipe!

    All I can say Peterson is you have failed me, I will never buy another system standard from you again brand new.

    "The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time."
    Mark Twain
    Posted 6 years ago #
  16. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Wow, Eric. That's a horrible experience you had with Peterson. You deserve a medal for perseverance! Surely someone from Peterson is noticing threads like this one and maybe something will be done about it.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  17. hfearly

    hfearly

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 867

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Not buying any Peterson made past the year 2000 anymore. My experiences with "newer" ones are noted here: http://pipesmagazine.com/forums/topic/peterson-metal-band-fell-off

    That said, in an estate lot that I received today, I found a Peterson 317 shape from around the WW2 area (Round Made in England stamp). Looks very well manufactured from what I can tell through all the grime Wouldn't expect my 2010-made 301 to last for 70 years ... well pipes were still pipes back then, I guess.

    Suffering from a serious case of "EPARD", also known as the Estate Pipe Acquisition and Restoration Disorder.
    Posted 6 years ago #
  18. cigrmaster

    cigrmaster

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 13,661

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Sorry people but Peterson obviously does not give a crap about their customers. They continually send out inferior pipes by the thousands hoping their customers dont complain too much. They are aware of their quality control issues yet do nothing because people keep buying their pipes. Unless people refuse to do business with them, they will continue the status quo.

    Harris
    Posted 6 years ago #
  19. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    However, break-in was a b*tch ... Now however, it smokes very well and it's a handsome pipe. Their higher priced pipes I hear don't have this problem.

    No idea why, but it's been my experience (as noted, mine are all older pipes, but range from mid to high end), as others have mentioned, that all Peterson briars take an inordinately long time to break in.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  20. lordofthepiperings

    lordofthepiperings

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2010
    Posts: 6,462

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    This topic has been mentioned a lot. I'll say this, I own five Petersons in three different lines and they all smoke wonderfully. The draw is great on all of them, they smoke pretty cool, and the grain and staining on them is nice as well. Chalk me up as one who believes you get a really good pipe at a really good price.

    "The thinking man always smokes a Peterson." -Peterson of Dublin
    Posted 6 years ago #
  21. sasquatch

    sasquatch

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 934

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I will recant a bit here, I thought hard about the pipes I looked at in person, and there were a few that didn't have obvious flaws.

    But... I picked up a lot of pipes at that showing. The metal band (on the stem) fell off of one when I opened it up. Lots were misdrilled, the nickel cap was loose on a few system pipes, stems were crookedly bent throughout, fit and finish was pretty bad. Open a pipe up and find chunks of briar or globs of pre-carb sitting in the airway....

    If someone had brought me this batch of pipes and said "We are a new pipe manufacturer, we would like your opinion of this product." I would say "Come back when you have the quality control issues dealt with."

    Posted 6 years ago #
  22. hfearly

    hfearly

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 867

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Do they even have quality control? No I'm not joking, I'm serious. Maybe with the current economic climate in Europe the two workers who'd sign off on the lower-grade pipes were replaced by a stuffed teddy bear with much lower payroll ...

    Posted 6 years ago #
  23. jdto

    jdto

    Junior Member
    Joined: Nov 2012
    Posts: 94

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    That's sad and a little scary, Sasquatch. I've been lucky with the two Petes I bought new. Both of them smoked nicely (after I applied a bit of mud to bring the bottom up flush with the draft hole, that is). They broke in well and it was tough to sell them, but I ended up feeding my PAD with other pipes.

    (Nice avatar, by the way, Sas)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  24. foggymountain

    foggymountain

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Aug 2012
    Posts: 2,984

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Wow! Sorry to hear about all the problems you guys are having with Petes. I have a lot of them, and overall I think they are a good value, but only the ones that cost $200 or more. They do take more care with the more expensive pipes. I would suggest avoiding slick finish Petes such as the Red Spray, and also avoiding the walnut finish, which has a strong taste. Whats good about the high end Petersons is that you may get a better piece of briar than you get from some other makers, for the price. Also the P lip is a help with bite if you smoke a lot. It seems that the pipes under about $250 are dipped in stain, to save on labor cost. I remove the stain from the inside of the bowl and shank with a high proof alcoholic drink, let dry, and the breakin is easier. There is an international Peterson pipe club online, where you may get answers to Peterson problems, and it has a way for you to contact the company.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  25. badbriar

    badbriar

    New Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 46

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I prefer the look of the "Woodchipper" finish over the swirlled corkscrew rustication. All of my rusticated Petes are like that, including a superb smoking Deluxe. Must admit that the only Petes I have kept, except for a new 05 system, are all older estates. My smooth 307 is in excellent condition, but does not have as 'shiny' a finish as the newer ones do. Only thing I notice is that there seems to be a difference in the P-lip bits. Some are much more sharply defined - less rounded - than others. Even though there are a lot of more expensive pipes on the market, Petersons are just satisfying to have & hold - much like a good woman!
    RR

    It takes me all night to do what I used to do all night, but I'm still doing it!
    Posted 6 years ago #
  26. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    I prefer the look of the "Woodchipper" finish over the swirlled corkscrew rustication.

    Wow, that's interesting. You're probably not the only one, either.

    And I agree about the look and feel of Peterson pipes -- something about the shapes, the thickness, etc. They're just pretty pipes. I appreciate the modernist aesthetic of Stanwell, et al., but Stanwells are very cold by comparison.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  27. cmkiefer

    cmkiefer

    New Member
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 34

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Just purchased a Pete rusticated churchwarden. Not impressed at all. I'm not a serious collector, so it was kind of a big deal to drop the hundred bucks on a pipe. Poorly drilled as far as I can tell. Stampings (on the briar and stem) are of low quality. Still getting stain out of the interior of the shank after several cleanings. Smokes WET (that may be just me though). Overall, I'd consider my Grabows (mid 1980's vintage) to be of superior quality in general.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  28. crazypipe

    Teddy

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 3,582

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    What is ,is and what's going to be will be .
    Most of my pipes are from the old day's and they still smoke great

    Posted 6 years ago #
  29. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,695

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Just purchased a Pete rusticated churchwarden. Not impressed at all...Overall, I'd consider my Grabows (mid 1980's vintage) to be of superior quality in general.

    Ouch!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  30. lordofthepiperings

    lordofthepiperings

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2010
    Posts: 6,462

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I've actually been thinking of picking up a Peterson churchwarden. Most of the people I've talked to that have one said they're great pipes for the price.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  31. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    cmkiefer,

    Depending on where you purchased it, you may be able to return it. Or, try Peterson directly if that doesn't work out. I've heard that Peterson, despite the QC issues, is usually accommodating when a flawed pipe is brought to their attention. You could also subtly suggest they look at forums like this one -- squeaky wheels and all... Good luck!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  32. badbriar

    badbriar

    New Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 46

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I agree that Peterson is known to be one of the more accommodating manufacturers out there. Contact them and send it back. You're likely to get one that is better than average, from what I understand. Good posts on this on the International Peterson Pipe Club site.
    BTW - +1 on the Grabows. I have several of the obsolete adjustomatics and they are actually my go-to's for best smokers. Still, there's something about a Peterson! Petes are in that price range where you are willing to smoke them, but would be crushed if something happened to the pipe. Personally, I'd be upset about my DG's but wouldn't lose sleep over them. Now, a pipe with the price tag of a new Dunhill, I couldn't bring myself to smoke it - would have to suffice to hold it and rub it!
    bb

    Posted 6 years ago #
  33. cacooper

    cacooper

    Member
    Joined: Jul 2009
    Posts: 220

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Greetings all,

    I just purchased this Pete Kinsale XL13 during a recent trunk show at my local tobacconist.

    I must admit, I have zero problems. Finish is well done, drilling is spot on, metal work is nice. Break-in is underway with about a half dozen bowls so far and nothing out of the ordinary. Guess I got lucky. I will say the stamping is a bit weak, but other than that, a very nice pipe.

    Quality control can be an issue, as they're at maximum production capacity. Problem pieces do slip through. I know that's not a good excuse, but it is an unfortunate side effect of speedy production. The sales rep informed me that Peterson is having trouble securing enough briar, and can't keep up with demand. A mixed blessing so it seems.

    CACooper

    Posted 6 years ago #
  34. cmkiefer

    cmkiefer

    New Member
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 34

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Frankly, I'm that customer, that if I don't like your product, I won't return it, you'll just probably never hear from me again. This pipe is smokeable and I'm working to make it better (hopefully). I've added pipe mud to bring the base of the bowl up to the level of the draw hole. I'm gradually getting the stain cleaned out of the interior of the shank. Hopefully, I can get a decent cake built up in the bowl to help with the wet smoke.

    I appreciate Peterson's reputation for customer service and I do like the look of many of their higher end pipes though I wouldn't pay that much for a pipe. Just wanted to try a churchwarden and peterson seemed like a good bet at the time. I'm not bitter about this pipe, I'll just be more careful in the future.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  35. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I just purchased this Pete Kinsale XL13 during a recent trunk show at my local tobacconist.

    I have zero problems. Finish is well done, drilling is spot on, metal work is nice. Break-in is underway with about a half dozen bowls so far and nothing out of the ordinary. Guess I got lucky.

    Sure, if considering a low to mid-range Peterson, holding and carefully examining the pipe as we recommended here goes a long way in avoiding the problems often experienced by those purchasing such a pipe sight unseen from an on line vendor.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  36. msandoval858

    msandoval858

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 1,004

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Having owned several Petersons as well as having worked in a shop that sold them, I can honestly say the examples of flawed pipes I see regularly are astonishing compared to the QC they were known for 10-15 years ago.

    My best guess is maybe they are trying to produce more volume than they are capable of? Recently, I noticed JR is carrying several models on their site. Anyone who knows JR knows they don't deal 1's and 2's when it comes to quantity. They buy big volume and sell at discount pricing, that's how their model works and it works well.

    I've always liked Petersons shapes and finishes but used to recommend them as great pipes for people new to the hobby. I can't in good conscience say the same about them now. Maybe if you are buying in person at a B&M and can thoroughly inspect your purchase before you put money down, then you might be safe. As far as mail order like so many of us rely on, I'd pass.

    Mike
    Posted 6 years ago #
  37. pitchfork

    pitchfork

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 3,962

    online

    Login to Send PM

    Yeah, I'm usually like that about purchases (not wanting to bother with complaining), but a pipe is fairly expensive. Wouldn't do any harm in letting Peterson know -- not even asking for a refund. Have to do what you feel comfortable doing, though.

    By the by, my good friend has a Peterson rusticated prince churchwarden and his is fine.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  38. hfearly

    hfearly

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 867

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I've always liked Petersons shapes and finishes but used to recommend them as great pipes for people new to the hobby. I can't in good conscience say the same about them now.

    Spot on. Sadly a lot of the 'older' website around the net still recommend Peterson's to new Pipe Smokers, and most of the time those are among the first hits on Google. Folks new to this hobby have no clue what a drill hole even is, where it is supposed to be or what to look out for. And let's face it - 95% of all Tobacconists out there these days don't know a bit about pipe smoking, they are in it for a fast dime.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  39. kris

    kris

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 446

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I LOVE my Petes but would NEVER Reccommend them to a noob, purely because of the extended break-in...

    Posted 6 years ago #
  40. irishflake

    irishflake

    Junior Member
    Joined: Jun 2012
    Posts: 80

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I really have a beef with Peterson! Their pipes might smoke oK, but they really look like they are being made in China on the cheap!
    I think they should be ashamed of themselves! I would only buy an estate Peterson -no younger than 30 years. Compare any Peterson shape from before and now. The Donegal has declined 500% Look at them on Smokingpipes.com, they look like crap! Look at an older one and you will see a bona fide rustic root finish. The new ones look like a boy scout with a Dremel tool made it. Also, the pipe cleaner issue is beyond me! Why can't they drill a straight hole? The high end/limited editions are cheaply made as well, the silver work is really sub standard.

    "Mount quickly and ride! There is a miasma over this village!"
    Posted 6 years ago #
  41. bigvan

    bigvan

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Mar 2011
    Posts: 2,316

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    "I LOVE my Petes but would NEVER Reccommend them to a noob, purely because of the extended break-in..."

    Do Peterson's have a longer break-in period than any other factory pipe? I didn't realize this was one of their (many) issues. Or is this more of the pre-carb debate?

    Posted 6 years ago #
  42. thrax

    thrax

    New Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 13

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I don't know. I just bought some Nutty Cut tobak and its fine.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  43. thrax

    thrax

    New Member
    Joined: Jun 2011
    Posts: 13

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Sorry. I misundertood the topic, I thought you were referring to the Peterson tobak which I am a fan of

    Posted 6 years ago #
  44. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Do Peterson's have a longer break-in period than any other factory pipe? I didn't realize this was one of their (many) issues. Or is this more of the pre-carb debate?

    From personal experience all my Peterson briars took a long time to break in -- longer than any others in my collection. I have six, my newest Peterson is a Donegal lovat hallmarked 1979.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  45. kris

    kris

    Senior Member
    Joined: Sep 2012
    Posts: 446

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Yeah, my Pete's all took a long time too.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  46. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,695

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Break-in was longer on my two Petes than my other new pipes, and much longer on my Aran than my Rosslare. I cannot swear to it, but my guess is that it was due to stain in the stem.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  47. troutface

    troutface

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 1,404

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My first (and only) Peterson is a bent Kapet that won't pass a pipe cleaner, not even close. I'm sending it back, which means I'll probably spend $10 shipping to replace a $70 pipe. That stinks.

    "Each of you be a light unto yourself; betake yourself to no external refuge. Hold fast to the Truth. Look not for refuge to anyone beside yourself." -The Buddha
    Posted 6 years ago #
  48. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My first (and only) Peterson is a bent Kapet that won't pass a pipe cleaner, not even close. I'm sending it back, which means I'll probably spend $10 shipping to replace a $70 pipe. That stinks.

    Depending on the vendor, they might send you a new one along with a return shipping label -- somewhat inconvenient, but if so, no cost to you. Doesn't hurt to ask.

    And while you're asking stuff, ask the vendor to make damn sure the construction is right -- (see horrors in posts above).

    Posted 6 years ago #
  49. troutface

    troutface

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 1,404

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I bought it at a B&M while on a trip out of state, so I have to send it to Peterson. Sorry, I should have been more clear about that. And while I'm venting I have to send my Xikar lighter back because it takes 10 or 15 pulls to get a light. It's less than a year old. Arrrgh.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  50. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    If you live in a town with a shop that sells Xikar products, just take it in and they will replace it on the spot, no questions asked at no cost to you, or credit you the full price for a pricier model.

    I hear you pain. There's no Xikar dealer anywhere close to me and had to return mine to Xikar last year -- now the replacement also pooped the bed and has been sitting in a drawer for 6 months.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  51. hfearly

    hfearly

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 867

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Haha, my local BM guy told me he won't sell me that Xicar lighter he has in the display case because "he'd grew tire of me returning ti every 3 months". I guess I should mark his words

    Posted 6 years ago #
  52. mrenglish

    mrenglish

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 2,303

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Yeah, I had three of the Pipe Masters, the Old Boy knock off. On each one, the post holding the flint tube came loose or fell off. After that, I wrote Xikar and they nicely sent me a a 4th one, but I do not use it. I picked up a different lighter of theirs, the one that has the three tools in it. It's pizo-electic and is so-so. The tools are very hard to get out of their slot, with the pick tool being next to impossible unless you pry it out with something.

    As for the Peterson's taking longer to break in, I used to agree with this. Of all the Peterson's I have picked up this year, only two were difficult and they were Kapet's. It was the stain inside the shank that needed removed. They are smoking fine now.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  53. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 2,128

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I'm no pipe expert. My Peterson Kilarney 306 P-lip was one of my first pipe buys. It smokes english blends quite nicely. It is a system pipe, and I didn;t quite understand what that meant until recently. It has a space for moisture collection behind the tenon. A cleaner will never go straight through this pipe, which is ok. It means you have to separate the stem to clean the draw to the bowl. Took me a bit to figure that out.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  54. rigmedic1

    rigmedic1

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 4,049

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    The newest Peterson that I have is a 2009 St. Patrick's Day pipe, a 150 bulldog. Since it was an estate purchase, I cannot attest to the break-in period, but it smokes well. It does have a hotspot on the lower right side of the bowl, which may develop a burnout if I am not careful. The fit of the band and stem is not very good for a pipe that retails in the $100 range. It is an okay pipe, and I like how it looks and smokes, but all of my older Petes seem much better made.
    I have a Kildare X105 billiard that I bought from an overseas vendor, around 2007. The fit and engineering seem superior to the 2009 pipe, but it has a matte finish. It is very good for an entry level pipe, and sold for under $50.00 new.
    The last newer Pete I have is a Grafton 999, again, from the European market. It is spot on for construction, fit, and finish. It has no flaws that I can find, other than a less glossy finish than say, a Rosslare. Part of the "Grafton" nomenclature is gone, either rubbed off or not stamped correctly (another estate, btw.) It smokes very well, and I use it for Virginia tobaccos.
    Also, I bought a new Dublin style churchwarden to replace a K&P Dublin churchwarden that I lost. The bowl is differently carved and sized, and seems... cheap. Smokes ok, but I was sentimentally attached to the one I lost, as it was a gift from my late wife.
    I have a '98 XL315 System, an Emerald 264, and a Shamrock from the 1940's. I think they are well made, they are pleasant to smoke, and have no issues.
    So, I guess what I am getting at is my older estates seem better made than the newer. I think I shall stick with the older.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  55. numbersix

    numbersix

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 5,695

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I hate to report this, but as some of you may know my Peterson Rosslare Royal had a few issues, so I sent it back to Dublin for repair. Then sent it back again because they didn't replace the stem when I felt they should have.

    The other day I took the stem off to clean it as I hadn't done so in a while and the small band fell off and onto the floor.

    I was able to do a quick repair by rubbing some beeswax on the stem and place it back on - so no harm done. I still love the pipe all in all, but I may have to rethink my earlier statement that their fit and finish is okay.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  56. undermidnight

    undermidnight

    Member
    Joined: Nov 2012
    Posts: 226

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I bought one of the Peterson Christmas pipes last Christmas from Tinderbox. The finish started bubbling. Thinking I was smoking it too hot, I consciously make sure I was not smoking it too hot. Still bubbled in new areas. I was pretty upset about it. I never took it back, but one of the guys from Smoker's Haven said to take it back to them and see what they can do. If they can't do anything (i.e., take it back for another) he may be able to do something with the finish.

    I was pretty bumbed about it. Only smoked it 4 times

    Jason

    "The cosmos is also within us. We're made of star-stuff. We are a way for the cosmos to know itself." - Carl Sagan
    Posted 6 years ago #
  57. orionpyoung

    orionpyoung

    Member
    Joined: Mar 2012
    Posts: 132

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    My first new pipe was a Peterson Aran bulldog. The fit and finish seemed good to me and it smoked well. But I couldn't stand the P-Lip so I have recently sent it in with hopes of getting some tins in exchange for it. My wife bought me a Peterson green churchwarden last Christmas and as rigmedic1 mentioned it seems cheap. Mine also smokes wet no matter how dry the tobacco is. I just hang onto it because its a gift and hey it takes up space on my pipe rack which helps me avoid PAD.

    "A Dutchman without a pipe is a national impossibility. If a Dutchman were deprived of his pipe and tobacco, he would not even enter Paradise with a glad heart."

    -Schotel
    Posted 6 years ago #
  58. hfearly

    hfearly

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 867

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Undermidnight, Peterson will exchange the pipe no questions asked when the finish bubbles.

    I talk from my own experience here, happened to me as well. I was talking in person to the Peterson sales rep for my local B&M and he said that it's probably a faulty bowl when that happens, i.e. hidden sandpits or knots in the wood that cause excessive temperature on that spot which leads the varnish/shellac to bubble, regardless how careful or slow you smoke.

    Downside is that it took Peterson 9 weeks to procure a replacement pipe. In hindsight I should have just stripped of the bubbled varnish with some acetone and re-finished it myself. But in any case, I told them that kind of crap can't happen with a 350$ pipe and they completely agreed (at least)!

    Here is a picture of the bubbled finish after about five to six minutes into the first "smoking pleasure".

    I know, I don't seem to have anything good to say about Peterson, reporting one horror story after the other, but that's truly my current experience with Peterson: one crap thing happens after the other. I'm beginning to hate all things Peterson...

    Posted 6 years ago #
  59. undermidnight

    undermidnight

    Member
    Joined: Nov 2012
    Posts: 226

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Yep, that is exactly what my pipe did. I will take it to Tinder Box and see what they say. If I have to send it back to Peterson, so be it. It is a beauty of a pipe.

    Thanks for the info..

    Jason

    Posted 6 years ago #
  60. User has not uploaded an avatar

    briarfan63

    New Member
    Joined: Dec 2012
    Posts: 7

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I have never purchased a new Peterson pipe, so I am of no help as I have seemed to look very little at new ones at my local tobacconist. I have always enjoyed estate pipes and plan to continue purchasing them.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  61. badbriar

    badbriar

    New Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 46

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    One line in Peterson's offerings that is reported to have not so infrequent issues with finish bubbling is the smooth finish in the Kinsales. Was about to pick up one in a beautiful estate that looked like new, but decided to pass after reading about the potential of problems with the smooth finish. Unfortunate because that pipe sure was a real looker! I'll wait for the same style in rusticated to come up. My only smooth Pete is an older 307, which is stellar - a favorite. My 4 others are rusticated and they have no issues at all as expected.
    Must admit that I've been fortunate with no problems with any of my Petes - but they are all older pipes in fine condition. Do not have any newer than 2007.
    bb

    Posted 6 years ago #
  62. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    As some know, my oldest Pete is hallmarked 1979, and I've had no issues either. It sucks to have bubbling lke that happen on a new pipe, but on an estate, if it wasn't expensive to acquire, the finish can pretty easily be entirely removed and the pipe stained. Of course, on the lower-end Petersons, doing this can reveal fills, but such a correction won't impair the pipe's smoking qualities -- in fact, it will likely improve it as, in my view, removing the original finish and applying stain will allow the briar to breathe better.

    I know (especially regarding my last statement here) more than a few puffers (and pipe makers for that matter) disagree with me, but it is my conviction and I am sticking to it!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  63. rondyr

    rondyr

    Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 274

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Santa is bringing me a new Peterson Aran for Christmas, and now y'all have got me a bit nervous about it.

    I'm so awesome, I make myself jealous of myself.
    Posted 6 years ago #
  64. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Santa is bringing me a new Peterson Aran for Christmas, and now y'all have got me a bit nervous about it.

    As mentioned many times by more than a few here, just be sure to examine your new Peterson thoroughly before smoking it -- draw, drilling, finish, stem, ferrule, etc. If it has (or soon develops) an issue, the vendor will usually make things right. Hopefully, your new Pete will be just great!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  65. swhipple

    swhipple

    Member
    Joined: Nov 2011
    Posts: 265

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Long time lurker, first time postin. I just purchased my first Peterson from Smokingpipes.com. The only flaw I could find is that it is drilled slightly off line. The pipe smokes well but you would think a machine made pipe would be more accurately drilled? I've got some pipes made my amatuer cravers that show better alignment.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  66. lordofthepiperings

    lordofthepiperings

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2010
    Posts: 6,462

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    rondyr, I have three Arans and mine are all wonderful smokers. They're all drilled well and have a good draw to them. The nickel band on all of them has been done wonderfully and I haven't had any problems with that either. The only flaw in them that I can notice is about two or three noticeable fills on them, but you don't really notice them unless you're closely examining the grain. Right now my 05 Aran is in my top three favorite pipes to smoke. I find myself reaching for it very often these days.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  67. morton

    morton

    Preferred Member
    Joined: May 2012
    Posts: 670

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I have a great many Peterson pipes (at least 25 at last count), some newer but most at least 10 or more years old. I agree with foggy and rothnh that the older Petes are of much better quality and that caution is the byword when purchasing newer Petes. Part of the problem, I think, is that craftsmen who actually smoked pipes have been replaced by semi-skilled (if that) poorly paid factory workers who wouldn't understand a properly drilled draft hole or more likely, wouldn't even care. Older estates are the way to go and ask questions of the seller. Remember as well, that no system pipe will pass a cleaner well because the system doesn't work that way - take them apart after and clean them then.

    Be careful what you wish for, as you just might get it.
    Posted 6 years ago #
  68. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    I just purchased my first Peterson from Smokingpipes.com. The only flaw I could find is that it is drilled slightly off line.

    The above can very likely can present a problem, as improper drilling can affect one or more of these and can cause some other possible issues: draw, condensation, gurgling. When the drilling is off, even a little bit, I'd return it; the pipe could be "OK" -- but why take the chance if after doing so, every time you smoke it you get pissed off when it whistles, and/or gurgles?

    The only flaw in them that I can notice is about two or three noticeable fills on them

    Fills and pits are a common (even to be expected) "flaw" in a low-end and even mid-range Peterson (or most any brand, for that matter).

    Much of the reason why those "perfect" briars with bird's eye and/or straight grain are a lot more expensive is because of the way they look; sometimes the briar is better, but not always the case. It just looks better and there's less of that better looking "grade."

    Those less expensive pipes are "prettied up" with paint, rustication, etc. to hide them, but, of course, the fills and flaws in the wood remain. Personally, I hate the paint and finishes one hell of a lot more (and there's a lot more issues with those as well) than the surface fills and pits as those fills and pits do not interfere with the briar's smoking qualities.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  69. hfearly

    hfearly

    Preferred Member
    Joined: Oct 2012
    Posts: 867

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    Fills and pits are a common (even to be expected) "flaw" in a low-end and even mid-range Peterson (or most any brand, for that matter).

    None of the 1950s-1970s "low end" Comoy's and GBDs that I have acquired lately have a single flaw - properly drilled and no fills. Maybe the grain is not as spectacular as in the higher end models but that's that. Mind you, that was during the time where pipes were 1) cheap and 2) in such high demand that factories used whatever briar blocks they could find. Both aren't true anymore and regardless quality has declined, quite upsetting, no?

    Posted 6 years ago #
  70. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

    Unregistered

    Posts: 15,036

    offline

    Login to Send PM

    None of the 1950s-1970s "low end" Comoy's and GBDs that I have acquired lately have a single flaw - properly drilled and no fills.

    So true. I was referring to what seems to be S.O.P. with too many of the new low to mid-level pipes of recent make.

    That's the main reason why I haven't purchased a "new" pipe in many years. I buy estate pipes and choose them very carefully.

    Posted 6 years ago #

Reply »

You must log in to post.

 

 

    Back To Top  | Back to Forum Home Page

   Members Online Now
   pitchfork, ashdigger, spartan99, 3rdguy, cshubhra, marc75, smudgersmissingleg, rodo, yohanan, jguss, bullet08, frankrem, darthvader, jiminks