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Depression Era Cooking

(19 posts)
  1. buster

    buster

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    Maybe some of you have seen Clara before? I think she is awesome! This video shows her making peppers and eggs. I've made it and it is very good. I remember my mother frying potatoes and hot dogs and Clara has a video making that also.

    Enjoy,

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    Think slow, act fast.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  2. buster

    buster

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    Fried potato and hot dogs

    [+] Embed the video | Video DownloadGet the Flash Video

    Posted 1 year ago #
  3. photoman13

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    Good stuff. The bread from the first one looks amazing.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  4. weezell

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    May God Bless her heart...My mom and dad would cook like that.Bet you her kitchen cabinets are jammed with canned goods.(Because you never know,we might need it)

    Posted 1 year ago #
  5. lankfordjl

    lankfordjl

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    Thanks for posting!

    My parents were depression kids, born in the early '30s. My dad's father was born in 1897, so I learned a lot from the way he lived; in the 1980s he still lived like the rural 1920's - outdoor toilet (outhouse), the bath tube was a metal tube in the kitchen, canning vegetables, gardening, hand-wash clothes, syrup-making, etc.

    I grew up on food similar to that. And my wife and I still eat similar meals from time to time. Fried cabbage and weenies are good too.

    But, my daily summer lunch as a kid was: purple-hull peas, cornbread, corn on the cob, fresh tomatoes and onions, fried okra, and maybe chow-chow (southern hot-sweet relish; like a salsa) on the side...all products from my dad's garden. He has worked in a garden every year now from over 70 years...and has a huge patch of turnip and mustard greens right now. My parent still can and freeze lots of food every year.

    My wife and I make our own sour dough bread every week - been doing that for about a year now; one loaf a week. We make our own sauerkraut; which is great stuff! Our cabinet is full of jams, jellies, and preserves from our garden. Good Stuff!

    "Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint." -Mark Twain-
    "A pipe helps a wise man to think and gives a fool something to put in his mouth" -Trischman's Paradox-
    "Therefore I run in such a way, as not without aim;...but I discipline my body and make it my slave." -1Cor 9-
    Posted 1 year ago #
  6. captainprophesy

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    Lankfordjl... I have my garden as well, looking to double its size by spring. I want to have enough veggies for through out the entire year... I am also in the process of making a chicken coop and will be having about 3 hens for eggs.
    My wife and I were just talking a couple of days ago that we need to start canning, neither one of us have ever canned so its kind of exciting. We also want to see if we can make some jams and what not.

    Its a great feeling to try and be as self sufficient as possible.

    I carry a gun... because a cop is too heavy!
    Posted 1 year ago #
  7. pstlpkr

    Lawrence

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    Good stuff.


    "Ending a sentence with a preposition is something up with which I will not put." Winston Churchill
    View Lawrence  Whitcomb's profile on LinkedIn
    Posted 1 year ago #
  8. austinxpipe

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    My soon to be father-in-law has a grapevine and makes his own jelly. It's fantastic. I usually don't get much as my fiancé like to crack it open when I'm gone (and who could blame her?) I can't wait to have my own place so I can tend a small garden.

    I like to smoke pipes
    Posted 1 year ago #
  9. lankfordjl

    lankfordjl

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    @captainprophesy

    We had chicken last year, but coyotes killed them - terrible lose; they destroyed the pen (an electric fence is the way to go next this year). If you need any suggestions on canning, let me know. I'll can give you an opinion based on country wisdom and science knowledge.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  10. User has not uploaded an avatar

    Anonymous

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    Great thread. I grew up eating from the garden in the summer and from the jars in the winter, and still do today.
    Love canned meat/fish and veggies....

    lankfordjl: I have a real coyote problem here as well. Rabbits and chickens don't stand a chance.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  11. beardedavenger

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    Being raised by my grandparents I grew up eating this kind of food. Fond memories.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  12. mikephillips

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    My grandparents married during the depression. I think many people don't realize that, in very rural farming communities, very little changed. I was in 4th grade and we were studying the great depression, and when I went home and asked my grandmother (raised by my grandparents) about it, she chuckled a little and told me that they were already pretty poor and raised almost everything they needed anyway, they barely noticed. One of the things they did notice was that they were paying less for flour, sugar and other staples, than before.

    I will tell you something else...being raised that way, you learn to waste nothing. My grandmother kept everything that could possibly be re-used, and as a result I'm quite the hoarder myself. When I look at something that really should be tossed, part of my brain says "Get rid of it, it's in the way and you'll never need it", the other part says "But what if someday you do?"...the latter usually wins.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  13. buster

    buster

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    Good to see this topic revived.

    I stumbled across this recipe and made it. It was somehow familiar? Then I told my sister that I had it stuck in my memories but did not know who made it. She told me our grand mother made it for us on Easter! Nana is gone now but it is funny how food memories can be so strong. Now every time I make it I think of her.

    I give you "Eggs Goldenrod "

    http://allrecipes.com/recipe/goldenrod-egg/

    Posted 1 year ago #
  14. zyrcon

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    A friend of mine started raising chickens last year and recently brought me a dozen fresh. Wow were they good. I usually toss in everything but the kitchen sink and scrable them up. These had a ton of flavor all on their own. Good stuff.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  15. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

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    sounds like my kind of cooking. I just mixed some sausage and ground beef into a can of ranch style beans. Come on tax return...


    Cut me... I bleed black.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  16. cigrmaster

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    My grandmother on my fathers side cooked using all the parts of an animal. My favorite dish she made was called giblets. It consisted of chicken necks, chicken stomachs and meatballs in a brown gravy served over white rice. You should have heard the sound of people sucking the meat off the bones of the chicken necks, it was pretty weird. She would also make sweet and sour tongue which was amazing.

    Harris
    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. ohin3

    ohin3

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    I grew up amongst an Italian immigrant family so the depression mentality was pumped into us from a young age. Peppers and eggs is an Italian American staple and it is a true art form. We grew up eating dishes that were made with a lot of passion and engineering to make the cheapest possible ingredients taste good. There is a lot to be said for doing the best with what you've got.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. nsfisher

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    I grew up on a Farm. When I left home, I bought a 7x16' homemade camper trailor and put it in the woods. No electricity, no bathroom, no running water. I cooked on a woodstove and a Coleman camp stove. I dug my well in a dried up streambed. I lived there happily for 2 yrs by myself and when I got married, wife and I spent a year there. Sure miss those days sometimes.

    If at first you don't succeed, have another bowl.
    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. eibhir

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    She's great! She reminds me of Grannie who is still trying to teach me how to cook. A lovely lady for certain!

    A smile will always keep them guessing.
    Posted 1 year ago #

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