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Another Earthquake/California

(24 posts)
  • Started 1 month ago by anthonyrosenthal74
  • Latest reply from yuda
  1. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

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    Just breaking on the news. This time a 6.9 in Southern California. Hope all of you in California are safe.

    Arrrrr, shiver me timbers! International Talk Like a Pirate Day is September the 19th!!!
    Brothers Of The Black Frigate
    Posted 1 month ago #
  2. shanez

    shanez

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    Felt that one in Vegas.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  3. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    This one seems more troubling than that last one.

    Anyone directly affected??

    I know that you believe you understood what you think I said, but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant.
    Posted 1 month ago #
  4. ashdigger

    ashdigger

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    Definitely felt it in Vegas

    Ubi Ignis Est?
    Posted 1 month ago #
  5. anthonyrosenthal74

    anthonyrosenthal74

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    Definitely felt it in Vegas
    They're saying it was felt in Mexico.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  6. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    I feel bed for the people in Ridgecrest. Two strong quakes in as many days.

    I just watched the lamps and my monitor sway. It was definitely stronger, with more vibration in addition to the swaying that just went on forever. Some measure it at 6.9, others at 7.1. Having gone through a few of these that were centered only a few miles from where I was living at the time, I have a pretty good idea what the folks in Ridgecrest experienced. The question is whether another one is going to hit soon and whether it will be stronger still.
    Guess I'll pack another pipe with some Off The Rails. Seems appropriate considering.

    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt. - Mark Twain

    It is pointless to argue with a fanatic since a dim bulb can't be converted into a searchlight. - Jesse Silver
    Posted 1 month ago #
  7. georged

    georged

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    Haven't the geology guys said The Big One wasn't "if" but "when" for a long time?

    The good news is that SoCal's building codes reflect that. A Mexico City, Haiti, or turn-of-the-century San Francisco situation is literally impossible.

    Dogs live such short lives... and spend most it waiting for us to come home
    Posted 1 month ago #
  8. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Haven't the geology guys said The Big One wasn't "if" but "when" for a long time?

    All of my life. But remember that they're speaking in geological time, so soon could be any second, or a hundred years from now.

    SoCal's building codes have been revised several times as the science improves. When I retrofitted my house in Glendale I looked at the insurance requirements and far exceeded them, same with the houses I partnered in. It can be useful to have ties to Caltech's geology and seismology departments.

    This appears to be the beginning of an earthquake sequence, but no one knows for sure.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  9. alaskanpiper

    alaskanpiper

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    Can absolutely relate to what people are going through from our 7.0 (and thousands of aftershocks) mere miles away and only a few miles deep in november. We still have people rebuilding. Thankfully since the 9+ in 1964 engineering in Alaska has always had earthquakes in mind. Living on the ring of fire definitely has it's benefits and detriments. Hope everyone near the epicenter in California is getting by as well as they can. It sucks now, but it is always quite an experience to have lived through in hindsight.

    Best of luck to any CA pipers out there near the epicenter.

    "We are here to laugh at the odds and live our lives so well that death will tremble to take us." ---Hank

    "Yeah, well, you know that's just like, uh, your opinion, man..." --- The Dude
    Posted 1 month ago #
  10. mawnansmiff

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    If anyone ever read Simon Winchester's excellent "A Crack in the Edge of the World: America and the Great California Earthquake of 1906" then they would not choose to live in California!

    Regards,

    Jay.

    ...take up thy stethoscope and walk...
    Posted 1 month ago #
  11. mso489

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    sable', thank you for your first-hand reportage. Am I correct that this is NOT the San Andreus Fault, but another? I visualize that the San Adreus is more parallel to the coast. Is there any comfort in the idea that a series of strong but not so destructive or injurious quakes release some of the energy of faults? According to my now ancient course in geology in college, the strongest known earthquakes in North American history happened in the Midwest before it was settled by Europeans. These would have been in Illinois, Kansas, that general area. These are charted by the damage they did to rock formations and old surviving trees. I think these happened mostly in the 1700's or early 1800's without any European records. I'm not sure if Native American accounts have been recorded in lore, seen in pictograms, or otherwise survive.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  12. taildraggin

    taildraggin

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    Earthquakes are a distant 2nd to the CA DMV for not living here.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  13. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    Am I correct that this is NOT the San Andreus Fault, but another?

    Correct. There are hundreds, perhaps thousands of vault lines across the state.

    Is there any comfort in the idea that a series of strong but not so destructive or injurious quakes release some of the energy of faults?

    Not really. A release at one point can result in increased pressure somewhere else. There is an inexorable movement of plates, raising the western part of the continent, and putting downward pressure on the eastern part. There was an huge quake along the New Madrid fault that runs through Missouri in 1811 that was of a much greater magnitude than either of these.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  14. mso489

    mso489

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    sable', thank you for the tutorial. Stay safe ... though i don't know what you are supposed to do. Keep a pipe, blend, pipe cleaners and pipe tool ready at the door(s).

    Posted 1 month ago #
  15. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Haven't the geology guys said The Big One wasn't "if" but "when" for a long time?

    The good news is that SoCal's building codes reflect that. A Mexico City, Haiti, or turn-of-the-century San Francisco situation is literally impossible.

    As Jesse mentioned above, the when could be tomorrow or a millennium from now.

    But I wonder what is the basis of the SF statement. Yes, there are old brick buildings that have been retrofitted that may not survive a large shaker. Most houses of wood have also been retrofitted with sway bars, so to speak. New buildings should fare pretty well.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  16. ron123

    ron123

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    There was an huge quake along the New Madrid fault that runs through Missouri in 1811 that was of a much greater magnitude than either of these.

    I'd heard of a fault that went into parts of IL, but haven't heard anyone talking about it lately. I googled the New Madrid and found this. Anyway, I think (hope) we're ok up around Chicago, but wtf something's gonna get us sooner or later anyway...something catastrophic doesn't end much different than passing in your sleep, so why fret

    It’s not just the West Coast that needs to watch out for tectonic obliteration. The New Madrid Seismic Zone spans southeastern Missouri, northeastern Arkansas, western Tennessee, western Kentucky, and southern Illinois. It’s the most active earthquake zone east of the Rocky Mountains.

    Between 1811 and 1812, this zone experienced some of the largest quakes in history. And although they originated in the Mississippi Valley, they rang church bells in Boston and shook New York City — over 1,000 miles away! Even then-President James Madison and his wife Dolley reportedly felt shaking at the White House.

    After one particularly large rupture in the fault, the mighty Mississippi River was forced to run backward for several hours, devastating acres of forest and creating 2 temporary waterfalls. Fortunately the Mississippi Valley was sparsely populated back then. Today millions of people live in densely populated urban areas like St. Louis and Memphis, making this zone one of the biggest concerns for the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  17. georged

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    But I wonder what is the basis of the SF statement.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1906_San_Francisco_earthquake#Damage

    Posted 1 month ago #
  18. mawnansmiff

    mawnansmiff

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    I watched a BBC documentary tonight on earthquakes by Scottish geologist Iain Simpson Stewart MBE FGS FRSE and he stated that Los Angeles would likely be the next major Californian city hit and would do over $2 billion at least damage with countless loss of life!

    Regards,

    Jay.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  19. sablebrush52

    sablebrush52

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    I watched a BBC documentary tonight on earthquakes by Scottish geologist Iain Simpson Stewart MBE FGS FRSE and he stated that Los Angeles would likely be the next major Californian city hit and would do over $2 billion at least damage with countless loss of life!

    Hi Jay,

    Thank you for that cheerful report.

    As of yet, no one can predict with much certainty the when or where of an earthquake. The models are still being developed that may allow for that.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  20. jpmcwjr

    jpmcwjr

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    Misread gorged's post. Was thinking prospectively. And, yeah, it was grim in 1906, when my mom snatched up my crib and made for the East Bay..

    Posted 1 month ago #
  21. taildraggin

    taildraggin

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    Sandy cost $19B and most “average” hurricanes are costing ~$2B in damage, it seems. Don’t know average of tornadoes and other natural disasters, but it’s high. 7 mile wide space rock hit a few hundred million years ago at 40,000 mph and ended most life on earth in 11 minutes. Pick your spot and live.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  22. georged

    georged

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    Sandy cost $19B and most “average” hurricanes are costing ~$2B in damage, it seems. Don’t know average of tornadoes and other natural disasters, but it’s high. 7 mile wide space rock hit a few hundred million years ago at 40,000 mph and ended most life on earth in 11 minutes. Pick your spot and live.

    Sorry, but that advice seems disingenuous coming from someone who tried to end the world himself, singlehandedly:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N1KvgtEnABY

    Posted 1 month ago #
  23. mso489

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    I have a cousin who has lived in California most of his life, but grew up in Des Moines. He was a jazz and rock percussionist for decades and then got into the business end of music. He and his wife are more than well-off from selling a record label she started. I think of them, up north of San Francisco, every time there are fires or earthquakes in Cal. He's not one to chat back and forth by phone, email, or notes, so we don't keep in touch. I don't think he was affected directly by the fires earlier this year, and he's not in the range of the full effect of these earthquakes. But I do always feel concern for him. Most of the California people I know have moved elsewhere, here or other places.

    Posted 1 month ago #
  24. yuda

    yuda

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    Slept through both of those near Vandenburg AFB. Certainly one thing I won't be missing in a few months.

    Posted 1 month ago #

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