Whisky/Bourbon Glasses

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smokey789

Member
Apr 14, 2020
113
205
59
Western Pennsylvania
If you use some special glass, what is it? What makes it special for you? What do you recommend?

Edit: I just realized those might be two different kinds of glasses. I'm more interested in bourbon glasses, but I don't want to leave anyone out. Post your lager or beer glass as well if you'd like.

A picture is worth a thousand words, but I want to know your personal opinions. Please post a picture or image, if possible. It's not required, though.
 

Mr.Mike

Preferred Member
Nov 11, 2019
845
2,031
Pennsylvania
I prefer a hefeweizen glass for my beer. I don't know if believe all the science behind glass geometry and flavor, but beer is pretty and I like to look at it while I'm drinking it :)
As far a bourbon goes, as long as the glass is small I'll drink out of it.
KIMG0132.JPG
 
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musicman

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2019
1,091
5,812
Cincinnati, OH
Glencairn whisky glass for me. Recommended.

View attachment 29307
This right here. These glasses were designed to provide the best aroma and flavor for single malts, and I find they work great for American whiskies as well. They don't really take rocks well, though, if that's your style. When I'm drinking rye on the rocks by the pool I usually use a lowball glass.
 
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Casual

Preferred Member
Oct 3, 2019
2,390
8,469
NL, CA
Isn't it tougher to drink from and easily heat transferrable? I've read about them, a little. Great for nosing and flavor since both are used to sample the full flavor. Maybe that doesn't matter?
Haven’t found it awkward to drink from at all. You might have to tip your head back a couple degrees more than a rocks glass for that last sip, but I haven’t noticed.

Heat transfer is mitigated by three factors.
  1. It’s light enough you generally hold with a few fingertips rather than a full grip.
  2. The whisky is room temperature to start with so a few degrees warmer than room temperature isn’t easily detectable.
  3. Most important, the whisky doesn’t last long enough to heat up. :LOL:
 

skydog

Senior Member
Jun 27, 2017
478
626
I'm a glencairn devotee as well. It took a while for the shape to grow on me but from the first sip I noticed that it improved the whiskey/whisky experience for me. I went into the first tasting with a glencairn a bit hesitant of the whole thing but it didn't matter what the glass looked like to me when I was able to smell and taste the whiskey better from a glencairn.
 

smokey789

Member
Apr 14, 2020
113
205
59
Western Pennsylvania
Riedel Cognac glasses for Cognac, Scotch, Bourbon, Tequila,etc:

View attachment 29321

Every bit as good as glencairn glasses but more multi purpose.
I poured myself a little Woodford Reserve Distiller's Select in a red wine glass. I was thinking it would be best for the nose and palate. I think it was a reasonable choice, better than a standard short mixed drink glass.
 
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smokey789

Member
Apr 14, 2020
113
205
59
Western Pennsylvania
I'm a glencairn devotee as well. It took a while for the shape to grow on me but from the first sip I noticed that it improved the whiskey/whisky experience for me. I went into the first tasting with a glencairn a bit hesitant of the whole thing but it didn't matter what the glass looked like to me when I was able to smell and taste the whiskey better from a glencairn.
That's what I found with the red wine glass. It helped the olfactory sense and the taste was more complex. It brought out the spice instead of heat, the honey and vanilla, the slight oak and the plum.
 
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