WHC Cased Bulldog

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klause

Preferred Member
Jul 9, 2012
554
0
okay, I know the pipe was made in France, but the silver mounting was done in England, and the pipe was stamped for, and sold by, an English tobacconist - William H. Carrington - hence I've put this in the British pipe section.



Anyone know anything about WHC?

 

pitchfork

Preferred Member
May 25, 2012
3,850
21
WH Carrington was a fairly prominent purveyor of pipes in Manchester. Most of the ones I've seen are from around 1890-1920.
And several that I remember had silver mounts like yours, where the silver on the shank matches up with the silver on the stem. That one should clean up nicely. Congrats!

 

papipeguy

Preferred Member
Jul 31, 2010
15,799
7
Bethlehem, Pa.
Very cool pipe, klause and more so with the case. Please show us some pictures once you get it cleaned up. That will be a stunner.

 

jguss

Preferred Member
Jul 7, 2013
723
99
Here's a bit more. WH Carrington & Co. was founded by William Henry Carrington (1854-1938). William was one of four children, and the only son, born to John Carrington and Elizabeth Wilson (m. 1852). The family was from Stockport in Cheshire, and had apparently been cotton weavers. Certainly that was John's occupation for years before becoming a tobacconist sometime in the 1860s.
William Henry followed in his father's new trade, and by the 1881 census is listed as a tobacconist in his own right. A few years previously, in 1878, William Henry had married Martha Ann Wait. Together they had four children, three sons named Squire Sydney (1879-1963), William Arthur (1884-1955), and Stanley Marmaduke (1882-1923). They also had a daughter named Elsie Anne (1888-?).
All the boys followed in their father's footsteps for at least a while. Stanley may have retired early, perhaps due to the condition that caused his death at 35. The other two, Squire Sydney and William Arthur, continue to be listed as active in the fancy goods and pipe industries for many years.
WH Carrington as an entity dates back at least to the late 1880s. It continued to exist for about a century, with liquidation notices appearing in the London Gazette in 1987. Whether or not the business remained in the family that whole time is another matter; I doubt it, but have no evidence one way or the other.
The business operated out of a variety of Manchester addresses over the course of its life; the presence of a specific address would facilitate dating pipes/cases/ephemera.
And I agree; it's a beauty, and ought to clean up very well indeed.

 

klause

Preferred Member
Jul 9, 2012
554
0
Pitchfork, Papipeguy, thanks very much - appreciate the info and comments, gents.
John, once again your knowledge and research skills add a whole new dimension to these little gems - thank you, very much - I really do appreciate what you do to bring these pipes a little more to life - it really does enhance the pleasure I get from smoking them, and makes me look at them with a more appreciative eye. It's something to ponder, who of the members of the family, may have handled this pipe - who sold it, and to whom. Mental pictures, smiling faces, passing by my minds eye as I enjoy the pipe.
Thanks again.

 

jguss

Preferred Member
Jul 7, 2013
723
99
My pleasure, Klause. As long as I can make the time, I always enjoy digging into a bit of pipe history.

 

pitchfork

Preferred Member
May 25, 2012
3,850
21
John, once again your knowledge and research skills add a whole new dimension to these little gems
Roger that. Glad to see your posts here, John (or is it Jon?). Weren't you a regular on smokersforumsuk?

 

jguss

Preferred Member
Jul 7, 2013
723
99
It's Jon (short for Jonathan).
I was on smokersforumsuk, but didn't post much.

 

pitchfork

Preferred Member
May 25, 2012
3,850
21
Thanks, Jon. Got it. I vaguely remember your posts there, or maybe it was on N.A. Roan's blog

 

jguss

Preferred Member
Jul 7, 2013
723
99
Probably the latter. I published several articles on Neill's site, and lent a hand with his Comoy book.

 

ssjones

Moderator
Staff member
May 11, 2011
14,408
554
Maryland
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I think we can let that mongrel slide into the British section!

Have you ever considered doing a display of your turn of the Century (or earlier!) pieces at a show, etc.? I'd love to be able to see all of them in one display.

 

klause

Preferred Member
Jul 9, 2012
554
0
Cheers, xrundog - it's coming along nicely - it's an easy clean, really just a wipe down - it was just handled with messy hands, other wise relatively well cared for.
Jon, sorry about the "h" - should have remembered
 

klause

Preferred Member
Jul 9, 2012
554
0
Al, thanks for that, I appreciate it ;-).
Never thought of a display, but now that you mention it I should take pics of 'em all. Maybe, one day, I'll make it to one of those great shows you have over there - I think I'd be like a kiddie in a massive sweet shop.
Hopefully get pics of cleaned pipe up later.

 

huntertrw

Preferred Member
Jul 23, 2014
3,862
27
The Lower Forty of Hill Country
"I think we can let that mongrel slide into the British section!"
ssjones:
Sorry, but there is no dog at this show! :)
klause:
You are a lucky fellow; what a lovely pipe is your cased Carrington! I am eager to see the "after" images, and, more importantly, to hear how it smokes. Of what is its stem made?