What Happened to the Coating of this Brand New Chacom?

Log in

SmokingPipes.com Updates

9 Fresh Ardor Pipes
New Cigars
72 Fresh Peterson Pipes
3 Fresh Bill Shalosky Pipes
18 Fresh Rossi Pipes

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

Drucquers Banner

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

Tobacco Treasures Ad

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

PipesMagazine Approved Sponsor

Chris81

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 11, 2021
153
966
41
Malaga, Spain
Title edited. Capitalize important words! -jpm

I was smoking my brand new Chacom (I got it just very few days ago) when I realized there was something like a bubble on the surface of the briar. Not being sure exactly what that was, I touched it and it sort of peeled off, showing a brownish and matte surface underneath. I can also feel it if I pass my nail. It’s the first time this happens to me and I haven’t mistreated the pipe in any way. What should I do, considering it’s a new pipe?
92551065-9C25-44CA-AC96-9B1C327E0D0C.jpeg
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Like
Reactions: JOHN72

edger

Lifer
Dec 9, 2016
2,348
16,911
72
Mayer AZ
If the pipe is lacquered, and if it isn't new production, and therefore hard to find, and if you like it, I would carefully use nail polish remover and a cotton pad to remove the coating and wax the stummel. I did this on a Grabow that was shiny and chipped and the stain remained unaffected. Worked great! FWIW.
 

anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
11,273
21,312
44
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
If you purchased it recently I would contact the seller and ask here opinion.
It looks like a laquer finish that has bubbled.
If I remember correctly this has happened before,was it the green Peterson pipes?
it happened with one sav. From what people said it was applied in too humid of an environment and hence had too much water which is what bubbled. Or that's how I understood it. Seems like the weather is more chaotic then it used to be and that is my theory on why suddenly this issue pops up with several different makers. Basically dealing with conditions they aren't expecting. Either way I'd contact the person you bought it from and at worse it won't effect how the pipe smokes.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jpmcwjr and paulfg

Chris81

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 11, 2021
153
966
41
Malaga, Spain
Looks like a fill, from the picture.
No, it's not a fill, the surface was just perfect, definitely looks like the lacquer bubbled
it happened with one sav. From what people said it was applied in too humid of an environment and hence had too much water which is what bubbled. Or that's how I understood it.
This totally makes sense, I think it can explain what happened. I used the pipe about 4 times, I think if there was some humidity in the briar it could have created enough "steam" to make a bubble in the lacquer.
If the pipe is lacquered, and if it isn't new production, and therefore hard to find, and if you like it, I would carefully use nail polish remover and a cotton pad to remove the coating and wax the stummel. I did this on a Grabow that was shiny and chipped and the stain remained unaffected. Worked great! FWIW.
I will consider it, in case the seller tells me there is no warranty on this... which could be the case since I used it 4 times, however I'm pretty sure I will not get such a perfect finish just with wax
 

anotherbob

Lifer
Mar 30, 2019
11,273
21,312
44
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
No, it's not a fill, the surface was just perfect, definitely looks like the lacquer bubbled

This totally makes sense, I think it can explain what happened. I used the pipe about 4 times, I think if there was some humidity in the briar it could have created enough "steam" to make a bubble in the lacquer.

I will consider it, in case the seller tells me there is no warranty on this... which could be the case since I used it 4 times, however I'm pretty sure I will not get such a perfect finish just with wax
I could be wrong but that explanation made sense to me. Though I'd take it as the pipe has some story and it won't hurt the over all experience.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BROBS

mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
38,053
47,280
I have two Chacom and other French pipes, and have found them solid and sound, so I think you have a foundation to work on. One possibility is to simply sand off the outer layer of finish. By regularly polishing the pipe after use, it will develop its own inner shine, as do unfinished pipes, and eventually become better looking than the finish would have been, though it takes some years. This is an optimistic diagnosis, but I think it is likely. I wouldn't sand it down to raw wood, just enough to take off that outer layer that is unstable, with a fairly light grain of sandpaper, and smoke from there.
 

Chris81

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 11, 2021
153
966
41
Malaga, Spain
I could be wrong but that explanation made sense to me. Though I'd take it as the pipe has some story and it won't hurt the over all experience.
It doesn't change the way it smokes, for sure, it also remains a beautiful pipe.
I miss a bit the idea to have a pipe without any visibile defects, most of my pipes are estate and literally full of defects... those from the previous owners plus the ones I add!
 
M

Magnum207

Guest
It does not appear to me as being a Lacquered pipe, nor does it appear to be a fill. I would use a small amount of edible-type oil and rub that spot to see if it disappears. Then re-wax.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jpmcwjr and BROBS

Chris81

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 11, 2021
153
966
41
Malaga, Spain
It does not appear to me as being a Lacquered pipe, nor does it appear to be a fill. I would use a small amount of edible-type oil and rub that spot to see if it disappears. Then re-wax.
There is definitely some kind of matte coating, I can feel a very thin gap when I pass my nail on the "crater". I can either remove the coating completely with acetone, which is what I did with my first pipe that had a terrible glossy red lacquer, and then wax it, or just keep it as it is now. I really like the finish it has now so I'm not really sure if simple wax will mantain those beautiful veins visible like they are now.
 
M

Magnum207

Guest
There is definitely some kind of matte coating, I can feel a very thin gap when I pass my nail on the "crater". I can either remove the coating completely with acetone, which is what I did with my first pipe that had a terrible glossy red lacquer, and then wax it, or just keep it as it is now. I really like the finish it has now so I'm not really sure if simple wax will mantain those beautiful veins visible like they are now.
I have never used any non-consumable, harsh chemicals on the inside or outside of any pipe. If the Lacquer is as thin as you describe, I would use a high-grit wet/dry sandpaper to remove it. This would be more uniform and prevent any unwanted disturbance, removal, or unevenness of the water-soluble stain originally applied. Then wipe down with a damp cloth to remove sanding dust and re-wax.
 
Mar 2, 2021
3,478
14,141
Alabama USA
No, it's not a fill, the surface was just perfect, definitely looks like the lacquer bubbled

This totally makes sense, I think it can explain what happened. I used the pipe about 4 times, I think if there was some humidity in the briar it could have created enough "steam" to make a bubble in the lacquer.

I will consider it, in case the seller tells me there is no warranty on this... which could be the case since I used it 4 times, however I'm pretty sure I will not get such a perfect finish just with wax
Tell us the seller and we will never make a purchase with them ever.
 

lightmybriar

Lifer
Mar 11, 2014
1,322
1,848
Are you a newer smoker? One of my first “real” pipes was a Chacom and they do indeed lacquer their pipes. I smoked too hot in my first few years of smoking and bubbled the lacquer on my pipe. Pardon the “new smoker” question, I’m only asking because this was my experience. Some smokers I know prefer to smoke this way, and if it works for you, then that’s fine. But it will cause this to happen. Hope that’s helpful information. Not a judgement in any way.
 

craig61a

Lifer
Apr 29, 2017
4,351
32,881
Minnesota USA
Most likely lacquer finish, and any residual moisture sealed under the lacquer will cause that.

Pipemakers do use shellac to finish a pipe, but it's mostly a very thin cut, and meant to seal in stain.

Lacquer would be sprayed and give a thicker coating, which is what you're probably seeing here. Acetone or lacquer thinner will remove it. Alcohol does not remove lacquer. Alcohol removes shellac. Buffing the surface with white diamond will bring up a shine, or if you don't have a buffer, use an old clean terrycloth towel and get a hold of some rottenstone. You can sprinkle that on the terrycloth and then hand polish the briar to level you'd like. Then wax.
 

Chris81

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 11, 2021
153
966
41
Malaga, Spain
Are you a newer smoker?
No worries! I sort of am a new smoker. I bought my first pipe 10 years ago and smoked it every few days with a wrong technique. It's only been in the last year that I've bought other pipes, improved the technique, etc.
My first pipe was a 50€ Lubinski with a very thick glossy lacquer and I have mistreated it for 9 years, nothing happened, no bubbles at all. I decided to remove the lacquer only because I was tired of that red glossy finish and I thought that a porous surface would make it less hot - it was getting really hot.
Ok, my pipes may still reach higher temperatures for a very short time, then I stop smoking and relight them when they're not too hot anymore, but this doesn't explain a bubble in the lacquer: in my opinion either the product used is wrong or the technique to apply it was wrong or the briar was too humid, etc.

I have never used any non-consumable, harsh chemicals on the inside or outside of any pipe. If the Lacquer is as thin as you describe, I would use a high-grit wet/dry sandpaper to remove it.
There are those who use sandpaper and those who use acetone, personally I belong to the second group because I hate the idea I could be taking off some wood, leave marks or do some irreversible damage to the pipe. Acetone is not such a terribly dangerous chemical, it is naturally contained in plants and in our own blood in low doses. You just need to wear gloves and leave an open window to avoid prolonged contact, inhalation etc.