Staining a Pipe?

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photoman13

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2012
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I have slowly been learning more and more about restoration of estate pipes and thought I would try my hand at staining a pipe. I have sanded it down and then used micromesh to get it really smooth. My major question is regarding types of stain. Can you use regular wood stain? The bowls get hot so it was something that concerned me.
This is what the pipe looked like originally.


This is the pipe sanded and the shank shorted due to a crack.


This is with a little water rubbed on it. I would like to make it look similar to this. Any suggestions for a newbie would be really appreciated.



 

briarbird

Senior Member
Dec 7, 2011
433
0
In my opinion, leather dyes are the way to go. Fieblings are the ones I use. If you want that grain to really pop out use their USMC Black first, then sand at 600, then 1000 grit and use a lighter color to get that contrasted coloration. That's my two cents.

 

photoman13

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2012
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Do they sell those dyes at local hardware stores or do I have to buy them online?

 

carlosviet

Member
Apr 23, 2012
142
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Proved, used, recommended and complimented method: A mix (50-50) of brown shoe polish and antiseptic iodine (in any pharmacy, OTC). Spread well, let it dry one night and buff later by hand with a piece of cloth until it does not mark the cloth. It turns rustic wood into a noble and glossy bruyere finish.
Please, notice that you must use tin shoe wax:

Do not use the easy and fast one:
. That one only taints

 

nsfisher

Preferred Member
Nov 26, 2011
3,567
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Nova Scotia, Canada
If you truely want to make a beautiful looking pipe with no stain or varnishes mate, just rub Extra Virgin Olive Oil in the wood. Next week rub it in again, and again the next week. You will find the "Look" that you were looking for in your picture.

 

ejames

Preferred Member
Oct 6, 2009
3,917
1
The Fiebings alcohol based stains should be available at good hobby or leathers or online. The have a wide variety of colors.

 

photoman13

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2012
2,826
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Thanks guys I really appreciate all the answers. I probably would have gone a completely different way and screwed it all up. :D

 

ssjones

Moderator
Staff member
May 11, 2011
14,418
572
Maryland
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I'm with ejames, Fiebings shoe dye is great. I have three colors, black, medium brown and oxblood. You really have to thin them down to get a light stain, just mix in some alchohol and a touch of dye. I just duplicate what Steven Laug (NASPC newsletter contributor, etc.) does:

http://smokersforums.co.uk/showthread.php?t=102196
The good news is, if you goof up, start over!

 

cajunguy

Preferred Member
Jan 22, 2012
756
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Metairie, LA
I'll throw in another vote for Fiebing. It's what I use almost every day. If you don't have a Tandy Leather store near your house, you can try Pipe Maker's Emporium on the internet. They even have a variety box. PIMO Pipecraft has soluble dyes that you mix yourself. That way, you can determine the lightness/darkness of the stain by how much stain powder you use.
There are several reasons to stick with the alcohol based dyes: the alcohol evaporates quickly, meaning a faster dry time; and the dye component, I believe, is vegetable based, which means its non-toxic.
As Briarbird stated, what you're looking for is a contrast stain. Coat it with black to get the dye into the softer grain lines (I like rubbing it in), sand until the harder grain is lighter, then coat with a brighter stain.

 

photoman13

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2012
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Will the Fiebings method give it a glossy shine? or do I just use carnuba wax to achieve that.

 

ssjones

Moderator
Staff member
May 11, 2011
14,418
572
Maryland
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Will the Fiebings method give it a glossy shine? or do I just use carnuba wax to achieve that.
No, you'll have to buff the briar with White Diamond to bring up a shine, than finish with carnuba wax.
Cajunguy: using the PIMO stains, is it necessary to "set" the stain with a flame, like the Fieberlings? That step was a little scary to me

 

photoman13

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2012
2,826
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Any methods that don't require a buffer? I do have carnuba wax from walker briar works that doesn't require a buffer. Sorry I am such a newbie guys.

 

tobakenist

Senior Member
Jun 16, 2011
492
0
If you want to use more natural dye's, a wet tea bag is great, I got a brilliant effect by just rubbing with green Grass, a nice reddish Orangey one using Paprika, if you just look around you can find hundreds of natural Dye's. :wink:

 

cajunguy

Preferred Member
Jan 22, 2012
756
0
Metairie, LA
Cajunguy: using the PIMO stains, is it necessary to "set" the stain with a flame, like the Fieberlings? That step was a little scary to me
You don't necessarily have to set either with a flame. I use very light coats and find they often dry before I even think about setting them on fire. I use a pipe cleaner bent in an arc and apply a thin coat, then wipe off the excess. If I want a darker shade, I add another coat, et cetera. No flame required.
And Photoman, do a web search for Paragon (smooth grain) and Halcyon (rusticated) waxes. These can be used in lieu of carnuba. Apply, let dry, buff off with a soft cloth (like flannel). The shine isn't as pronounced, but its a good alternative. Also, I will say, the majority of the shine on my pipes comes from sanding (I go up to 12k grit). After that, I require very little white diamond or carnuba to achieve a very shiny effect.

 

ssjones

Moderator
Staff member
May 11, 2011
14,418
572
Maryland
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Thanks, I'll give that a try. I had a lot of wet stain on my last pipe, it really caught fire and left a burn mark I had to sand back out.

 

photoman13

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2012
2,826
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The wax I have works pretty good without a buffer. I just wasn't sure if there was some sort of glossy dye or something similar.

 

ejames

Preferred Member
Oct 6, 2009
3,917
1
After you apply the stain the surface will have a soft kinda fuzzy look to it from the grain raising. It will not shine with just the wax-not like it should anyway. If you don't have a buffer go over it with some of the finer Micro-Mesh grits or some 1200-1500 grit sandpaper then wax.

 

photoman13

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2012
2,826
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thanks for the tip. I will order some micro mesh. I currently only have up to 3000

 
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