Repressing tinned tobacco

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pcfdave

New member
Mar 10, 2021
22
23
Hello all, has anyone repressed tinned tobacco to be able to smoke it sooner. Ie. many have suggested including the tin itself on C&D Bijou to sit on it. I was curious if taking it out and pressing it for a month if the process helps achieve a bit the aging process. Maybe I'm entirely off. Any help or insight appreciated!
 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
31,086
50,245
Hello all, has anyone repressed tinned tobacco to be able to smoke it sooner. Ie. many have suggested including the tin itself on C&D Bijou to sit on it. I was curious if taking it out and pressing it for a month if the process helps achieve a bit the aging process. Maybe I'm entirely off. Any help or insight appreciated!
You want a pasta press.

41lFdjo89CL._AC_.jpg
 

jeremyreeves

Member
May 14, 2015
118
586
Hi, @pcfdave . Lots of people, including myself, age tobacco for long periods of time in the tin because the tobacco changes through a kind of fermentation, just sitting in the tin,. Pressing, while a process that will deepen flavors, and increase sweetness, cannot replicate the microbial activity that takes place over long-term aging in an airtight container. Bijou has already been very hard pressed and is comprised primarily of Virginia from 2003 and of Katerini from 2006, yet neither the pressing nor the age of the leaf used results in the kind of effects that can be achieved by aging tobacco in a sealed tin or jar. That said, Bijou is delicious, in my opinion, just as it is, and we do not intend to suggest with our packaging that you have to age it in order to enjoy it. We suggest aging because the blend is comprised of high sugar leaf that will definitely yield incredible results through aging for a decade or more. My recommendation would be to keep the tin you have intact, since it is already on its journey, and buy newer tin to smoke for now. Even a year or two can make a significant aroma difference, but it simply takes time for those impacts to be as significant on the flavor the tobacco offers.
 

anotherbob

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2019
8,649
16,014
43
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
Hi, @pcfdave . Lots of people, including myself, age tobacco for long periods of time in the tin because the tobacco changes through a kind of fermentation, just sitting in the tin,. Pressing, while a process that will deepen flavors, and increase sweetness, cannot replicate the microbial activity that takes place over long-term aging in an airtight container. Bijou has already been very hard pressed and is comprised primarily of Virginia from 2003 and of Katerini from 2006, yet neither the pressing nor the age of the leaf used results in the kind of effects that can be achieved by aging tobacco in a sealed tin or jar. That said, Bijou is delicious, in my opinion, just as it is, and we do not intend to suggest with our packaging that you have to age it in order to enjoy it. We suggest aging because the blend is comprised of high sugar leaf that will definitely yield incredible results through aging for a decade or more. My recommendation would be to keep the tin you have intact, since it is already on its journey, and buy newer tin to smoke for now. Even a year or two can make a significant aroma difference, but it simply takes time for those impacts to be as significant on the flavor the tobacco offers.
So the cellar series is more these are great but in a few years trust us they'll be wow. Then not ready for smoking just for sale. Nice to know. I was wondering about seersucker and I just don't have the patience to age. So thanks a bunch.
 

jeremyreeves

Member
May 14, 2015
118
586
sorry, my internet seems to have failed in the middle of my thought. Here is what I was trying to say:

Solani Silver Flake is good, but if you find a 15 year old tin of it, "wow! So special! Surper delicious!"
Well that is the idea behind the Cellar Series. Good tobacco, blended with high quality ingredients, but with a specific thought given to how the blend will age over time and how long the "legs" of a certain blend are.
 

pcfdave

New member
Mar 10, 2021
22
23
15 years....man I'm 50 but 65 seems like an eternity from now. Lol. Seems like there should exist some algorithm that is cost/benefits on spending more now on some aged stuff on the trade market so you can enjoy it while you can...Buy in bulk when you are young but buy the ready to go stuff when you're older and have the means while less years to enjoy it. Too depressing?....grin
 

anotherbob

Preferred Member
Mar 30, 2019
8,649
16,014
43
In the semi-rural NorthEastern USA
15 years....man I'm 50 but 65 seems like an eternity from now. Lol. Seems like there should exist some algorithm that is cost/benefits on spending more now on some aged stuff on the trade market so you can enjoy it while you can...Buy in bulk when you are young but buy the ready to go stuff when you're older and have the means while less years to enjoy it. Too depressing?....grin
it's the kind of thing you get when you already have a big cellar. Well the kind of thing you get to age when you have a big cellar.
sorry, my internet seems to have failed in the middle of my thought. Here is what I was trying to say:

Solani Silver Flake is good, but if you find a 15 year old tin of it, "wow! So special! Surper delicious!"
Well that is the idea behind the Cellar Series. Good tobacco, blended with high quality ingredients, but with a specific thought given to how the blend will age over time and how long the "legs" of a certain blend are.
makes sense. I am not too into aging stuff. I enjoy tobacco and it's nuances but don't consider myself a connoisseur or super patient either. I like smoking and the taste is kind the secondary level of enjoyment.
 
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Singularis

Member
Sep 11, 2019
156
842
Wausau, Wis
Hi, @pcfdave . Lots of people, including myself, age tobacco for long periods of time in the tin because the tobacco changes through a kind of fermentation, just sitting in the tin,. Pressing, while a process that will deepen flavors, and increase sweetness, cannot replicate the microbial activity that takes place over long-term aging in an airtight container. Bijou has already been very hard pressed and is comprised primarily of Virginia from 2003 and of Katerini from 2006, yet neither the pressing nor the age of the leaf used results in the kind of effects that can be achieved by aging tobacco in a sealed tin or jar. That said, Bijou is delicious, in my opinion, just as it is, and we do not intend to suggest with our packaging that you have to age it in order to enjoy it. We suggest aging because the blend is comprised of high sugar leaf that will definitely yield incredible results through aging for a decade or more. My recommendation would be to keep the tin you have intact, since it is already on its journey, and buy newer tin to smoke for now. Even a year or two can make a significant aroma difference, but it simply takes time for those impacts to be as significant on the flavor the tobacco offers.
Hey, this is great info to have, from the MAN himself!

I have a tin of Bijou (yes, just ONE :() and I've been wondering how seriously to follow the aging guidance when the tobaccos are now as old as 18 years (plus, mine was packaged and dated Jan 2019). So, maybe now is the right time to buy a couple more tins to try right away?
 

jeremyreeves

Member
May 14, 2015
118
586
Hey, this is great info to have, from the MAN himself!

I have a tin of Bijou (yes, just ONE :() and I've been wondering how seriously to follow the aging guidance when the tobaccos are now as old as 18 years (plus, mine was packaged and dated Jan 2019). So, maybe now is the right time to buy a couple more tins to try right away?
That sounds like a good move to me! If you are nearly at the 3 year mark on your existing tin, pick up a freshie to smoke now and see what to compare the aged tin to! In general, if I buy a tin of something, I try to pick up two. One for the cellar and one to smoke now. If I like the blend, then I will buy more for the cellar, and that way I can appreciate what has taken place in the tin over time I have let it sit, whether it's a few months, a year or a decade or more.
 

shanez

Preferred Member
Jul 10, 2018
3,924
14,661
47
Las Vegas
Seems like there should exist some algorithm that is cost/benefits on spending more now on some aged stuff on the trade market so you can enjoy it while you can
Algorithm #1: If you don't like it fresh, you're not going to like it aged.
 

BeardedBriar78

New member
Mar 29, 2021
1
3
Hi, @pcfdave . Lots of people, including myself, age tobacco for long periods of time in the tin because the tobacco changes through a kind of fermentation, just sitting in the tin,. Pressing, while a process that will deepen flavors, and increase sweetness, cannot replicate the microbial activity that takes place over long-term aging in an airtight container. Bijou has already been very hard pressed and is comprised primarily of Virginia from 2003 and of Katerini from 2006, yet neither the pressing nor the age of the leaf used results in the kind of effects that can be achieved by aging tobacco in a sealed tin or jar. That said, Bijou is delicious, in my opinion, just as it is, and we do not intend to suggest with our packaging that you have to age it in order to enjoy it. We suggest aging because the blend is comprised of high sugar leaf that will definitely yield incredible results through aging for a decade or more. My recommendation would be to keep the tin you have intact, since it is already on its journey, and buy newer tin to smoke for now. Even a year or two can make a significant aroma difference, but it simply takes time for those impacts to be as significant on the flavor the tobacco offers.
I’m very glad for this information. I bought my first tin a few weeks ago and was confused as to when the best time to smoke it would be. So the suggested ideal time would be 10-15 years from purchase date? I guess I have more Bijou to buy.
 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
36,083
37,141
I take Jeremy's point that pressing tobacco blends and aging are two different processes. I'm no pro at all, but it would seem that the pressure melds flavors whereas the aging allows fermentation to enhance the flavor in a different way. I call all of my home concoctions "mixes," not blends, because I just put them in a bowl and stir them together, and aging is not planned and is just incidental. Whereas the pros may use pressure, ovens, as well as aging to tune their blends. Also, they often pay strict attention to proportions. I only stir in equal parts of this and that, and a big pinch of the other.
 
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