Rapid Fermentation

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koscak

New member
Nov 26, 2012
21
0
hello

I try this interesting method ( from germany )for quick fermentation of some virginia and burly leafs ( i got the tobacco leaves from a relative, this season i will grow my own tobacco and this was a test :)), :

sprinkled cured leaves with honey water (1 tablespoon of honey to 0,5 liter of water), then placed one leaf at a time, and compressed. Then from the pile of some leaves ( 20 - 30) a roll is formed and rolled firmly in wax paper. The role is for 3 hours at 50°C - 55°C in the oven after that the leaves are restacked, the roll is unpacked again, the inner leaves are placed outside, rolled again and again pushed for 3 hours in the oven. If necessary, the sheets are again wetted with water and honey. I repeated process 5 times, until the roll gives off a subtle, pleasant scent of raisins ( i love smell of raisins). Then they are spread out to dry and cut, i put tobacco in glass jar to rest for at least 1 month. I sprinkled some treated cut tobacco with jagermeister and put him in plastic bag on heater for furder fermentation ( I told my wife that this is a hunters tobacco n.1 :)))).

sorry for my english :)

 

cigrmaster

Preferred Member
May 26, 2012
14,901
8,921
United States
koscak, welcome to the site. Your English is a hell of a lot better than my German so no worries, you did great.
What you are doing sounds very interesting and I would not be surprised if your experiment produces something very tasty. Keep us informed as to how it smokes after you try it.

 

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gray4lines

Preferred Member
Nov 6, 2012
679
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KY
I wonder if some blenders actually use a version of this for their own blends.
Roth, Isn't that what a cavendish is? Or am I confused?
I thought that cavendish style tobaccos were cooked with steam (wrapping them in wax paper and baking would create a hot, humid environment too) and sometimes had sugar or something added (honey).
Pretty much like a sped up maduro process (as far as cigars are concerned). However, baking maduro wrappers is regarded as "cheating" in the cigar industry I believe, even though many places do it for an even color. Whereas baking tobacco for pipe tobacco use (cavendish) is generally accepted.
Correct me if I am way off. Either way, it's a good idea and I'd be interested to see how it turns out!

 

gray4lines

Preferred Member
Nov 6, 2012
679
0
KY
Ahh, I see. And I have seen the tin-cooking come up here too.
So... would the process described above "sprinkled cured leaves with honey water...then placed one leaf at a time, and compressed...3 hours at 50°C - 55°C in the oven..." be considered a form cavendish-ing?
When I think of a cavendish, I think of "cooking" tobacco (Burley or Va's usually, right?) with heat, steam, and possibly a sugar to speed up the fermentation, and bring out more sweetness.
Thanks, for the answer!

 
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