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mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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Two tins and a pouch of tobacco ordered from PC on July 28 arrived midday August 1, in essentially less than four days USPS delivery, so both the retailer and the post office were in good form on this one. The order was correct and arrived in good shape. In this time when shipping can be slow, sometimes things go well.
 
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chasingembers

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Nov 12, 2014
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Lucky I guess as I've not noticed unusual delivery times. Still getting SPC deliveries in 2-3 days, got a package from Tobacco Pipes yesterday a day earlier than tracking anticipated, and puzzles from Asia in 6-9 days.
 

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BROBS

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Nov 13, 2019
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My last P&C order was packed perfectly and arrived without issue. Is this bizarro world?!
 

mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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I don't want to do a separate thread on the post office, which can get polarizing. In general, I've depended on it for years, and mostly -- with a few notable exceptions -- they've been dependable, even under difficult circumstances, like through the fleet post office aboard ship off Vietnam. Today I worry about the post office being diminished because, in addition to its important role in delivering checks and checks to pay bills for millions of people, and still being an important conduit for letters and packages (birthday and holiday gifts), post office locations anchor little rural communities and other remote locations where the schools have been closed, that have no other community gathering places. Many small but active towns simply wither when the post office closes, and residents lose track of each other, and their connection to the wider world. In a sense the USPS is the thread that holds the country together on the ground, when people put their smart phones in their pockets and step away from their devices, which contrary to popular opinion, they do.
 
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anotherbob

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I don't want to do a separate thread on the post office, which can get polarizing. In general, I've depended on it for years, and mostly -- with a few notable exceptions -- they've been dependable, even under difficult circumstances, like through the fleet post office aboard ship off Vietnam. Today I worry about the post office being diminished because, in addition to its important role in delivering checks and checks to pay bills for millions of people, and still being an important conduit for letters and packages (birthday and holiday gifts), post office locations anchor little rural communities and other remote locations where the schools have been closed, that have no other community gathering places. Many small but active towns simply wither when the post office closes, and residents lose track of each other, and their connection to the wider world. In a sense the USPS is the thread that holds the country together on the ground, when people put their smart phones in their pockets and step away from their devices, which contrary to popular opinion, they do.
one huge note in defense of the post office is there are places that other couriers don't get things to our if they do the rate is insane. Which often times has an effect on us we don't think of. There are many out of the way places that operate in tandem with businesses we use (what I mean for example mining companies often operating in the middle of nowhere near tiny towns, you might not buy what they sell but you buy something that uses what they sell) and if those companies needed to hire couriers for every letter every check their operating cost will certainly go up. That's the neat thing about government services (yeah there are very not neat things about them too) is they do not have to be profit motivated in their choices.
 
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mso489

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Feb 21, 2013
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The unseen and unofficial functions of the post office are what would be missed most, simply having a place that knows the faces of most of those in the community, knows many names and residences, knows when people arrive and move away, all without being surveillance oriented -- they know enough but usually not too much. In smaller towns, when the schools get consolidated to the largest town in the county, and most retail closes down in deference to chain dollar stores or Walmarts, the sense of community becomes remote. People stop keeping up with each other and communicating outside the family, if they even do that. Even churches, when communities lose populations, have circuit riding ministers that may stop at two or three communities on a Sunday morning and obviously cannot have the same role as a minister located in one town. As the song says," you don't know what you've got 'til it's gone."
 

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