Question for Pipe Makers About Lees

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Briar Lee

Lifer
Sep 4, 2021
1,692
3,597
Humansville Missouri
I’ll take “Famous Bullshit Stories” for $200, Alex…
My father had a Grade A milk barn, that I’d love to go back and listen to all the stories told there.

Five miles West of Humansville, a half mile South of Bug Tussle, and two miles North of Dunnegan one of the only things there was to do, except church and school, was tell stories.

But my family was prosperous in 1946, a dozen years before I was hatched.

They could afford the best, and bought it.

DC64F048-7F19-4267-99EB-1D5412C18B54.jpeg
 

Briar Lee

Lifer
Sep 4, 2021
1,692
3,597
Humansville Missouri
I think it's great you have a favorite pipe and enjoy collecting them. That's all that really matters.
BTW both sides of my family come from the farming areas around Columbia, MO
And if you talk to the old timers, you’ll soon hear stories of how “after the war” they could buy a new farm truck with only the cows it would haul to the sale barn.

There were droughts in 1934 and 1936.

In 1936 my father’s uncle Elmer got tired of fighting the bad prices. bad weather, and hard times and sold out his 60 acres to his wealthy sister Eva for $3.50 an acre. (Daddy had to pay $15 an acre to buy it back in 1944).

His machinery and horses and household goods brought twice what his land was worth.

My father used to almost cry, telling me how Elmer and his wife Cora slaved in the fields near Bakersfield California and never saw Humansville again.

Daddy and his parents got on an express train to California in 1946, to bury Elmer.

By then the whole family had the best of clothes, best of shoes, best of everything.

The war ended the Depression on the farm, and there has never been any time to farm more prosperous since.

Lee opened to a booming economy, especially for farmers.
 
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Hillcrest

Lifer
Dec 3, 2021
1,268
6,114
Bagshot Row, Hobbiton
And if you talk to the old timers, you’ll soon hear stories of how “after the war” they could buy a new farm truck with only the cows it would haul to the sale barn.

There were droughts in 1934 and 1936.

In 1936 my father’s uncle Elmer got tired of fighting the bad prices. bad weather, and hard times and sold out his 60 acres to his wealthy sister Eva for $3.50 an acre.

His machinery and horses and household goods brought twice what his land was worth.

My father used to almost cry, telling me how Elmer and his wife Cora slaved in the fields near Bakersfield California and never saw Humansville again.

Daddy and his parents got on an express train to California in 1946, to bury Elmer.

By then the whole family had the best of clothes, best of shoes, best of everything.

The war ended the Depression on the farm, and there has never been any time to farm more prosperous since.
You're wasting all these remembrances. You should be writing all these down and writing a book. You could call it 'The Legends of Spout Spring Hollow'. There is a dearth of good historical literature nowadays. :)🖋️