Pipe That Whistles? Not The Tune I Want To Hear

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carolinachurchwarden

Preferred Member
May 9, 2018
1,682
14
Raleigh, NC
Okay, so, my St. Patrick's Day Peterson is a bit of a whistler. I dry puffed on it before I ever filled the bowl and heard it whistle, but I've got a few others that whistle a bit too until you load it up. I filled it with tobacco today and fired it up. She whistled through the entire bowl.
Will this get better/worse over time and is there a way to fix it at all?

 

lightmybriar

Preferred Member
Mar 11, 2014
780
270
If I am recalling my research correctly, it’s a drilling issue in the stem. I have a Chacom that whistles. I think it has to do with the end of the tenon, but it’s been a while and so hopefully someone else will be able to elaborate or correct!

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,755
1,743
I watched a youtube (I know, I know...) and this guy had a pipe that whistled. He reamed the draft hole in the stummel side and it removed the whistle. It was a long time ago, and I can't remember much more about the video. But, I don't think you'd want to remove any wood, or mess with the draft hole dynamics, maybe just clean up the draft hole a little. There may be some turbulence cause the air to... do whatever it is that causes the whistle. Just maybe keep a light touch, with a drill bit that just fits into the draft, but don't push the drill bit into the chamber, just wind it around a little and see if that smoothes it out. You don't want to wallow out the taper into the chamber.
Or, maybe contact a repairman... if you don't feel confident doing this. That would be totally understandable. Heck, it may not even be the solution. It was youtube, afterall. :puffy:

 

chasingembers

Preferred Member
Nov 12, 2014
17,325
3,459
Does the stem do it when removed from the pipe? May be a bit of material in the draft hole. The drill bit on a senior reamer is great for that.

 

carolinachurchwarden

Preferred Member
May 9, 2018
1,682
14
Raleigh, NC
Interesting, cosmic. Might have to look it up. I'm confident in my ability to keep it light and clean it up if that's what it takes.
Actually, I'm not sure. I didn't remove the stem and try to draw on the shank end, but while smoking it definitely sounded like the whistle was coming from the bowl.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,755
1,743
Oh, and don't use the drill bit it a drill, just use it with your fingers. I forgot that part. It might be important, ha ha.

 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
18,755
1,743
Yeh, as soon as I hit send, I pictured someone putting their pipe into a vise and running a drill bit through the heel of their pipe, ha ha.

 

carolinachurchwarden

Preferred Member
May 9, 2018
1,682
14
Raleigh, NC
Yeah, that wouldn't be good, hahaha. I'll try another bowl from it tomorrow and see if it's coming from the bowl again when the stem is removed as well. If so, I'll try a bit down the hole and twist it about a bit to see if the whistle clears up.

 

cortezattic

Preferred Member
Nov 19, 2009
14,820
2,619
Chicago, IL
This article mentions the whistling issue:

https://pipedia.org/wiki/Airflow:_The_Key_to_Smoking_Pleasure
Maybe try a different stem, from another Peterson pipe (if it fits!), just to see if the problem is in the stem or stummel.

 

seldom

Preferred Member
Mar 11, 2018
870
334
Germany
In German the word for pipe is the same word for whistle. Pfeife. I suppose this Peterson is a Pfeife Pfeife.

 

carolinachurchwarden

Preferred Member
May 9, 2018
1,682
14
Raleigh, NC
Update, so I pulled the stem this morning and sucked on it and got the whistle by itself off just the stem. I then put my mouth around the stummel and sucked with nothing but an air sound. To double check I swapped the stems from my Christmas Peterson for the St. Patrick's Day stem and got the whistle sound again.
Pretty much confirms that the whistling is coming from the stem alone. I've read through the other threads listed above and have come down to two options.
1) It's coming from the bit end.
2) It's coming from the shank end.
I almost feel as though I can rule out option 1 because it looks rather smooth inside the bit. Also, I'm not sure I want to go messing with that end too much.
Option number 2 seems plausible, as the end of the stem does look like it harbors a sharper edge around the inside of the draft hole. I also noticed that the draft hole here on this Plip is much larger than the draft hole on my fishtail from the Christmas pipe. Could the larger air hole size be the culprit? When I get home, I may try to soften that edge on the shank end and see id that gets rid of the whistle.

 

sasquatch

Preferred Member
Jul 16, 2012
1,008
112
"it harbors a sharper edge around the inside of the draft hole"
This.
So relieve that edge somehow, a countersink bit or rolled up sandpaper or something.
Whistling=cavitation. Cavitation=turbulent air. Something rough, or sharp, or square in the airway. Most pipes will whistle if you draw hard enough (all pipes are a dog whistle, as it were) but any whistle at ordinary puffing is not a great sign for smoking, as well as just being annoying and silly.