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TheCROW

Lurker
Feb 11, 2020
26
58
Hey All,
I recently bought a Brebbia bent Tundra pipe that I like a lot.
I've smoked it two times and noticed that the pipe goes out well before the bottom of the bowl and cannot be relit. And some tobacco gets into the filter area.
Upon inspection I noticed that the draft hole is a bit high and not flush with the bottom of the bowl.
So I think I'm gonna use some pipe mud to heighten the bottom of the bowl.
The bowl is coated, so my question is do I have to clean it before using pipe mud? and after that, do I have to coat it again after the mud dries?
Thank you kindly in advance.
 

MilesDavis

Starting to Get Obsessed
Jun 16, 2022
187
423
The combination of honey and charcoal (from dietary capsules) works well as a coating. I haven't used it in place of pipe mud, however.
 
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Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
37,342
79,018
Chasing Embers recently mentioned it. it was plain yoghurt and charcoal powder. I don't think ash would work as well.
I use that for a chamber coating in the pipes I make. For repairs I'd use fireplace mortar and in the case of a draft hole above the chamber floor, I'd leave it alone. Some carvers, especially Danish ones, do this to create a moisture trap to prevent gurgling.
 

Chaukisch

Part of the Furniture Now
Aug 31, 2021
511
3,386
33
Northern Germany
I use that for a chamber coating in the pipes I make. For repairs I'd use fireplace mortar
Oh, just for chamber coatings. Thanks for the clarification.
and in the case of a draft hole above the chamber floor, I'd leave it alone. Some carvers, especially Danish ones, do this to create a moisture trap to prevent gurgling.
That shines a new light on it, I always thought of it as a flaw and that it's shabby drilling. Shows what I know,
I actually didn't buy a nice looking pipe just because of that. Another good lesson well learned.
 

phdaemon

Lurker
May 31, 2022
47
77
Do not get fireplace mortar. Fireplace mortar has an MSDS sheet that specifically states that there are chemicals in it that can cause harm. But first, let's clear something up:

Pipe mortar is used for repairs. It is traditionally made from cigar ash and water.

Pipe mud is used for chamber protection. The best recipe for pipe mud I've found is sour cream and pure edible grade charcoal.

Your problem should use Pipe Mortar. This type of mortar can be easily made using a combination of cigar ash and water. It literally turns into concrete. You can sand your chamber to remove any pipe mud that is currently in there (if it came that way from the manufacturer). Apply your pipe mortar to bring the bottom of the chamber up to the draft hole.

After a few days, it should be hard as concrete. Make sure it's smoothed out. After it's cured, you can then apply Pipe mud. Let that dry for about 24 hours, and you should be good to smoke. There will be absolutely no off-taste about it. The pipe mud is completely neutral.

Good luck!
 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
37,342
79,018
Pipe mud is used for chamber protection. The best recipe for pipe mud I've found is sour cream and pure edible grade charcoal
I've only ever heard that called a chamber coating. Pipe mud fixes chamber cracks and raises chamber floors. Never heard of pipe mortar.


Fireplace mortar has an MSDS sheet that specifically states that there are chemicals in it that can cause harm.
Once cured it's fine. Have you read the chemicals released by burning tobacco?
 
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phdaemon

Lurker
May 31, 2022
47
77
Once cured it's fine. Have you read the chemicals released by burning tobacco?
I wouldn't call it "fine" personally, some of them have Alumina silicate which is used as an insecticide amongst other things. Sure, burning tobacco has bad chemicals in it, no need to make it worse, IMO. Especially when you can use something simpler like cigar ash.

I've only ever heard that called a chamber coating. Pipe mud fixes chamber cracks and raises chamber floors. Never heard of pipe mortar.
I've heard pipe mud for the charcoal + sourcream mixture, I've also heard chamber coating. But for the one that hardens into concrete, I've always heard pipe mortar.
 
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woodrow

Might Stick Around
Oct 28, 2018
63
72
Melfort, Saskatchewan, Canada
JB weld from one pro restorer. Insert a pipe cleaner, mix up a batch and slowly drip some to the bottom of the bowl up to the level that you want. JB is very heat resistant, and is inert when dried.
After its set good and hard, you can round out the bottom a bit with a dowel and sand paper, or a dremel tool with the carving bit. You don’t need a lot to bring up the level.
 

jhowell

Can't Leave
Jul 25, 2019
449
744
JB weld from one pro restorer. Insert a pipe cleaner, mix up a batch and slowly drip some to the bottom of the bowl up to the level that you want. JB is very heat resistant, and is inert when dried.
After its set good and hard, you can round out the bottom a bit with a dowel and sand paper, or a dremel tool with the carving bit. You don’t need a lot to bring up the level.
I have used the JB Weld approach. Did some experimentation and found that the Kwik self-levels better than the regular - the opposite result of what I expected...
 

TheCROW

Lurker
Feb 11, 2020
26
58
Hey guys, thank you everyone for your replies and insights.
I decided to wait a bit to update this thread, as I wanted to make sure my "repair" worked:
I decided to go with CaneRodPiper's recipe for pipe mortar.
I followed his method and left the pipe for several days to dry.
The bottom dried up rock hard with a great texture. I cannot notice that anything was done to it under light!
I smoked the pipe several times since and everything is perfect.
I really recommend this method as all the ingredients are safe to ingest including Plaster of Paris.
For more info, you can find his video here:
Thanks go to CaneRodPiper.
 

UB 40

Can't Leave
Jul 7, 2022
338
3,221
60
Cologne/ Germany
nahbesprechung.net
Hey guys, thank you everyone for your replies and insights.
I decided to wait a bit to update this thread, as I wanted to make sure my "repair" worked:
I decided to go with CaneRodPiper's recipe for pipe mortar.
I followed his method and left the pipe for several days to dry.
The bottom dried up rock hard with a great texture. I cannot notice that anything was done to it under light!
I smoked the pipe several times since and everything is perfect.
I really recommend this method as all the ingredients are safe to ingest including Plaster of Paris.
For more info, you can find his video here:
Thanks go to CaneRodPiper.

For me this recipe sounds the best way to go. It’s cheap and easy to use, no plastic or other stuff used for example as in commercial mortar to repair a stove.

I once used Plaster of Paris to repair some cracks in a meerschaum rim, months ago. Excellent material that sticks even on that stuff.
 
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TheCROW

Lurker
Feb 11, 2020
26
58
Exactly, and the salt is an adhesion promoter, I heard old school house restorers mix salt and sometimes sugar with plaster to make it stick better for the hard to reach areas, it also dries faster and harder.
 
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