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vorgath

Lurker
Feb 4, 2019
25
2
Still playing around with the mix
Started out as 40% chopped cigar leaf, 40% latakia, maybe 20% nougat flavored tobacco. OK in reality it was probably more 45/45/10 mix. Drenched it in some liqueur, let it dry out.
First attempt ... whoa ... nicotine overdose :lol: and that comes from someone who smokes cigarettes.
Second attempt, I did add quite a bit of some cheap burley/Virginia something mix, put some liqueur in the tin can, let it sit, then let it dry (wrapped paper towels, to absorb the liquid). Not quite as strong this time. A lot harder to light this time though, but could be because I packed the pipe wrong (used a corn cob, straight stem, both times .. and it got HOT both times, but second time there was quite some issues getting it started)
Flavor ? Not quite what I expected, I think I need to try a different pipe than a straight corncob one, the mixture smells beautifully, but it just burning hot once it gets going.
Would a briar pipe help out a bit ?

 

vorgath

Lurker
Feb 4, 2019
25
2
Yeah, because shouldn't a corncob one smoke cooler by default ?
I may have to let the tobacco mix sit for a few days, blend together, and be more careful when I load the pipe, seems like some pieces of tobacco are long chunks.

 

mso489

Lifer
Feb 21, 2013
41,210
60,500
In fairness to the professional blenders, many/most of them will spend a year or more perfecting a blend, and go through scores of trial batches before they consider something ready for the market. So the fact that you or I, without training, won't usually come up with anything wonderful is less disheartening. It is fun to mix around, and sometimes I do get a mighty fine smoke, even though I'll never be ready for prime time as a blender.

 
the professional blenders, many/most of them will spend a year or more perfecting a blend

I think that the main difference between what they do, and we do, is that they have to make a blend that can be mixed 500 lbs at a time. A percentage point off here and there at such a high volume can throw a product off significantly.
Whereas, when I cook or blend, I just want a great meal or a great smoke, so I may not use a recipe at all. I will just throw together something using stuff I happen to have in the kitchen or in my cellar. I have no need to reproduce anything, because I know that the next time I blend or cook something I will again just use what is on hand.

 

vorgath

Lurker
Feb 4, 2019
25
2
Hmmmm I'll try it again, I smelled the pipe and it doesn't smell as well .. nice as my other ones. Have I smoked it THAT much ? No, have I cleaned it once, yes, salt and alcohol.
So, we'll see .. whether it's my lousy blending skills :lol: or improperly packing the pipe or whatever

 

krizzose

Lifer
Feb 13, 2013
3,171
18,798
Michigan
I’ve been blending a lot lately, and my success rate indicates a competence level of Sucks to Just Not Very Good. I think I’ve come up with about 4 real winners out 30 or so attempts. It’s a lot fun, though, so just keep experimenting.
About the only practical knowledge I think I can pass on is that, for almost any style of blend you’re making, some medium bodied straight burley and/or unflavored black cavendish are your friends. The former more so than the latter.

 

jaygreen55

Starting to Get Obsessed
Jan 29, 2015
172
177
Instead of drenching it with the liquer try spraying it with a fine mist and it will dry quicker with a much more subtle flavor

 

vorgath

Lurker
Feb 4, 2019
25
2
hahahaha well it said Amaro or something on the bottle, so I figured maybe it's an Amaretto knock off ... nope hahahahaha
And yes next time I'll definitely spray port wine, sherry, cognac whatever I pick, in a mist .. and do it several times if needed rather than drenching it

 
one of my favorite casings that is subtle, but yet makes a remarkable impact is a honey rum. I will put a quarter cup of dark spiced rum in a stainless sauce pan, and then drizzle a few tables spoons of some of the best honey available into it, and heat it and stir till it is completely infused. I mist it sparingly onto a medium to strong burley, and then let it dry before blending in some Virginias. It makes the burley less throaty and adds a zesty bit of subtle spiciness to the blend.
If you are going to mist it onto a darker cigar leaf (like a maduro), then add a few drop of coconut extract into the honey rum mix, and it seems to make the cigar-leaf more smokey, and it seems to make it play better with the accompanying blended leaves.

 

vorgath

Lurker
Feb 4, 2019
25
2
Coconut extract ? hmmm sounds delicious, could I add a few drops of virgin coconut oil .. or ?

 
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