Oxidized “Yellowing” Brebbia Spigot Fix?

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Law

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 1, 2020
166
216
Saudi Arabia
Greetings people,

I bought this estate Brebbia Pipe that had a “yellowing” of the spigot/metal part of the stem. I have tried to use silver polish to remove it with no luck, and used some trick with baking soda and hot water in a bowl with aluminum foil and it didn’t work.

Any Ideas on how to fix it?
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Law

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 1, 2020
166
216
Saudi Arabia
Just my opinion, but, I don’t think that’s oxidation—it looks like the plating might’ve been worn off with a combo of finger oils and handling. If it’s tobacco residue from smoking, some high proof alcohol like Everclear might clean that up. Good luck!
I live in Saudi Arabia so I can't have anything close to alcohol except 70% isopropyl wipes and even that didn't do anything. I am listening for more suggestions
 
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jpmcwjr

Moderator
Staff member
May 12, 2015
22,286
21,411
Carmel Valley, CA
Could that be plate silver, and some has worn away?

And how far in does the stem go? When it's fully inserted, do you see any yellow?
 

Law

Starting to Get Obsessed
Oct 1, 2020
166
216
Saudi Arabia
Could that be plate silver, and some has worn away?

And how far in does the stem go? When it's fully inserted, do you see any yellow?

Not sure if it is plate silver or not, it is a Brebbia Gala 981 for reference.

It does show when it is inserted, and that what bugs me.
 
Aug 9, 2013
29,590
54,550
Helena, Alabama
Yep, the plating has worn off. No easy fix. You could take it to jeweler and ask for a rhodium plating, which would cost about as much as the estate pipe, or just smoke it.
You could remove the rest of the plating, but the pot metal or bronze isn’t going to be very pretty. Maybe oxidize the bronze to a black using some liver of sulfur. Hobby shops in the US would carry it. So will Amazon.

It sort of baffles me that they would use plated metal. They saved all of maybe $3 on using plated metal. But, this is why I preach not to use polishes on pipe bands and such. In my day, I have done more repairs caused by that stuff than accidents. People just need to understand that oxidation is a part of the living metal. It is beautiful in its own way. I only polish when the oxidation interferes with the design. And then, I only do so with jewelers cloths.
 
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mingc

Lifer
Jun 20, 2019
3,069
7,450
The Big Rock Candy Mountain
Any tips or specific method?
Cos is a jeweller, so I'd listen to him. As for abrasives, you might try a set of polishing compound bars from say, Amazon, and start with the finest. I find that the bars can be hand-applied with rags. Again though, I'd look to Cos for advice, not me.

I preach not to use polishes on pipe bands and such. In my day, I have done more repairs caused by that stuff than accidents. People just need to understand that oxidation is a part of the living metal. It is beautiful in its own way. I only polish when the oxidation interferes with the design. And then, I only do so with jewelers cloths.
Cos, should I avoid polishing sterling too? Sterling is solid, not plated right? I've always assumed you can polish Sterling with impunity although I suppose that might eventually wear away the fine details.
 
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Aug 9, 2013
29,590
54,550
Helena, Alabama
Cos, should I avoid polishing sterling too? Sterling is solid, not plated right? I've always assumed you can polish Sterling with impunity although I suppose that might eventually wear away the fine details.
Well, every metal has it's fatigue point. You can polish it to where it becomes paper thin and become work hardened to exhaustion. You will see cracks start to appear, especially if it is a repair band and has an expanding shank pushing on it.
Using polishes sold over the counter will remove a lot of metal. At least with a polishing cloth, you can see when to stop. But, even cloths have their limits.
I probably should encourage polishing compounds, and just rake in the dough making new bands. puffy

But, I don't really make much money on bands, ha ha.
 
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mingc

Lifer
Jun 20, 2019
3,069
7,450
The Big Rock Candy Mountain
Well, every metal has it's fatigue point. You can polish it to where it becomes paper thin and become work hardened to exhaustion. You will see cracks start to appear, especially if it is a repair band and has an expanding shank pushing on it.
Using polishes sold over the counter will remove a lot of metal. At least with a polishing cloth, you can see when to stop. But, even cloths have their limits.
I probably should encourage polishing compounds, and just rake in the dough making new bands. puffy

But, I don't really make much money on bands, ha ha.
My problem is that I pay extra for the silver because I want bright shiny bits on my pipe. Leaving 'em tarnished undermines my purpose. I think I'll go for nickel from now on. Why don't people use more nickel? It stays shiny!
 
Aug 9, 2013
29,590
54,550
Helena, Alabama
My problem is that I pay extra for the silver because I want bright shiny bits on my pipe. Leaving 'em tarnished undermines my purpose. I think I'll go for nickel from now on. Why don't people use more nickel? It stays shiny!
Nickel is a more grey color, and doesn't keep a shine, doesn't really polish up as bright to begin with. Most will put a plastic coating over the nickel, then when that wear away...

If you wanna keep your band nice and shiny, hit it with a bit of whatever you wax the pipe with, and pull it to a tight film. I keep mine with a film of Renaissance wax.
Silver jewelry is a little different. Wearing it keeps it coated in oils from our skin. Maybe try rubbing your pipe band on your forehead occasionally. puffy
 
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