Long Term Storage of Bulk Aromatics?

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greatdane

Junior Member
Dec 26, 2018
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EDIT: Fixed Capitalization in Title (See Rule 9)

I wondered if anyone has had luck storing bulk aromatics in mylar bags long term? Did the taste change/diminish? Did you use oxygen absorbers?

My sense is that aromatics don't necessarily age well over time unless kept in vacuum sealed tins and containers.
 
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Servant King

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Nov 27, 2020
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Yep, put me down as another vote for mason jars. I've probably got two dozen different jarred aro blends; no issues that I can detect. My understanding is that the small amount of air in the jar or mylar bag is not a big deal, but that the most important factor is that no outside air is continuously getting into wherever the tobacco is stored, therefore drying it out. But hey, I'm just a Jewish kid from the San Fernando Valley, so what the hell do I know? ;)
 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
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Are we talking about cellaring them for 50 years? 20 years? 5 years? what?
I don't think even 20 years in a jar degrades the aromatic topping enough to make a difference. And, as to the tobacco used in the blend, a virginia based aro might get a tad sweeter, while the burley ones would just not change much at all. The key to tasting an aromatic is keeping the topping in tact. And, I don't think it would dissipate out of a jar, however, it could more fully integrate into the leaf giving you more balance between the topping and the flavor of the tobacco.

And, I don't think an oxygen absorber is going to help much with anything that happens in a jar or bag. The enzymes on the leaf eats up the oxygen first. This is the very first thing that happens when you close up a jar. So, that oxygen thing would be worthless, IMO.
 

lukasstrifeson

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Jun 23, 2019
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I've found that Mylar bags essentially "freezes" a tobacco - the aging over time is not your usual oxidation process; whereas, mason jars (I like to allow for 25-33% air by volume) will exhibit more of your 'aging characteristics', especially if you "let it breathe" with the seasonal temperature changes. With aromatics, it really depends on the blend. I've found some toppings/casings to hold steady for what seems like an eternity and others to lose much of its luster once you take it out of the tin...

I've had these observations for some time now and I think Jeremy from GLP said something similar along those lines in a recent podcast. (I'll link it if I find it later)
 
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sablebrush52

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Jun 15, 2013
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And, I don't think an oxygen absorber is going to help much with anything that happens in a jar or bag. The enzymes on the leaf eats up the oxygen first. This is the very first thing that happens when you close up a jar. So, that oxygen thing would be worthless, IMO.
I wasn't thinking of one of those. GL Pease has an article on his site about a friend's experiment in slowing down the aging process wherein oxygen deprivation was effective. And one could carry it even farther by employing an inert gas flush. Things do really well in Argon...

But I merely brought this up in service to the OP's question. He may want to keep it for 6 years or 60 years, who knows. He didn't specify.

I wouldn't bother with any of it, except for jarring or sealing in mylar, but I'm not going to be around for another 60 years, thank god
 

craig61a

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Apr 29, 2017
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I've stored aros in Mylar, and I haven't noticed much in the way of degradation. I've only been using Mylar for about 5 years, so my results aren't long term.

The rest I store in wide mouth Mason jars and vacuum. I use a Food Saver wide mouth vacuum attachment. Works great.
 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
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I wasn't thinking of one of those. GL Pease has an article on his site about a friend's experiment in slowing down the aging process wherein oxygen deprivation was effective. And one could carry it even farther by employing an inert gas flush. Things do really well in Argon...

But I merely brought this up in service to the OP's question. He may want to keep it for 6 years or 60 years, who knows. He didn't specify.

I wouldn't bother with any of it, except for jarring or sealing in mylar, but I'm not going to be around for another 60 years, thank god
I just don't think an that those oxygen absorbers sold for prepping really work the way our imagination tells up they will. It works on a principle that iron oxidation chemically changes the oxygen in the container to a more complex molecule. But, the iron oxide powder in those capsules is not very much. You'd have to pack half the bag in those things, and then your left with the smell of rust in the bag. In theory, it's a great idea, but the reality is that oxygen would probably do less damage than letting a few oz of powdered iron oxide smell up you tobacco.
 

anotherbob

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Mar 30, 2019
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Are we talking about cellaring them for 50 years? 20 years? 5 years? what?
I don't think even 20 years in a jar degrades the aromatic topping enough to make a difference. And, as to the tobacco used in the blend, a virginia based aro might get a tad sweeter, while the burley ones would just not change much at all. The key to tasting an aromatic is keeping the topping in tact. And, I don't think it would dissipate out of a jar, however, it could more fully integrate into the leaf giving you more balance between the topping and the flavor of the tobacco.

And, I don't think an oxygen absorber is going to help much with anything that happens in a jar or bag. The enzymes on the leaf eats up the oxygen first. This is the very first thing that happens when you close up a jar. So, that oxygen thing would be worthless, IMO.
what I've found is the bite mellows out in a month or two and after that it stays pretty consistent.
 

STP

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Sep 8, 2020
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Jars here as well, except stored in the Fido clamped-lid version. I have several aromatics going back 3-4-5 years that are still goopy. If longer, then it might be different. The environment in which you store the jars, or whatever container, is important as well. In my case, I keep the jars stored in a cabinet that’s away from sunlight, direct heat, etc. If you place the jars on a window ledge for a few weeks, then you’ll probably have different results. 👍
 

anotherbob

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Mar 30, 2019
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I haven't had a decent meal in the SFV since the Hot Dog Show closed down about 10 years ago. Last I saw, it was converted to an Umami Burger. And people wonder why other people snap and go on shooting rampages...
there has to be a few great places. I mean if the poodunk towns around here can have some good stuff, you gotta be missing out.
 
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