Kiln That Fired Millions of Clay Pipes Was Unearthed

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mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
27,076
1,905
Blatter and Blatter ought to have a photo exhibit in the store, unless and until a museum can be founded on site, or nearby. It's a worthy historical subject.
 
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olkofri

Preferred Member
Sep 9, 2017
3,088
1,504
Awesome! In Canada!

Never been to Montreal. Maybe I have an extra reason now. 🤔
 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
14,744
3,179
Monterey Peninsula
From the article:
As luck would have it, they found a brick kiln demolished down to its flooring. It’s circular, and shot through with narrow chambers. “They’re channel-like structures, through which the air would flow into the oven, and other openings where they could put charcoal in to heat up the kiln,” Roy says. The Henderson operations were vast: in 1871, the factory’s 50 workers, mostly Scottish or Irish immigrants, produced 7 million pipes.
Wow!

Great find!
 

vates

Junior Member
Sep 16, 2019
79
65
"The historic garbage still litters the shore of London’s River Thames—to the point that when mudlarks canvass the shore for treasures at low tide the pipes “crack and pop underfoot.”"

wow
 

jpmcwjr

Preferred Member
May 12, 2015
14,744
3,179
Monterey Peninsula
So it is! Thank you.

By the 19th-century, clay pipes were mass-produced in England, Scotland, France, and Germany, as well as Canada, Walker writes. The historic garbage still litters the shore of London’s River Thames—to the point that when mudlarks canvass the shore for treasures at low tide, the Wall Street Journal reported, the pipes “crack and pop underfoot.” Old clay pipes are often traceable to their source, because many manufacturers were in the habit of stamping their name along the stem. “To judge by the frequency of finds, stems marked HENDERSON or HENDERSON’S represent by far the most important marker or makers,” Walker writes.
Henderson refers back to the Montreal manufacture.
 
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