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didimauw

Moderator
Staff member
Jul 28, 2013
5,802
10,105
32
Burlington WI
This pipe hid for a long time just to avoid being sold. Think of being a child, watching all his siblings being sold off, one by one, while hiding in a closet for ever.

I'd put it on a plaque to hang on the wall.

The one that got away. Or the one that didn't get away technically. Lol
 

Chasing Embers

Captain of the Black Frigate
Nov 12, 2014
32,321
55,638
This pipe hid for a long time just to avoid being sold. Think of being a child, watching all his siblings being sold off, one by one, while hiding in a closet for ever.

I'd put it on a plaque to hang on the wall.

The one that got away. Or the one that didn't get away technically. Lol
None of them were sold.
 
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condorlover1

Preferred Member
Dec 22, 2013
6,080
14,173
New York
They went to the 'Corn Field' never to be seen again! I have to agree with @chasingembers in that I hate digital, do all my book keeping manually, keep all my receipts transposed to large accounting ledgers. Some 90% of my correspondence in manual. Anyone who has ever received tobacco from me will have noticed my use of an ancient typewriter for addressing envelopes. Everything we do around here is manual unless it involves filing on PACER or something of that nature.
 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
36,618
39,814
Big Depression trauma on both sides of the family impel me to find "homes" for anything I no longer want. My wife's family farmed and did well during the Depression, but on the farm they saved everything to use for repairing other things. However, I too mistrust the digital world. I enjoy using it within my limited abilities, but I print everything I want to see again. I would no more entrust a document to quirky, hack-prone, inscrutable devices than I would send a kid across town on a big city bus.
 

frozenchurchwarden

Preferred Member
Mar 1, 2014
3,081
2,817
There is a watchmakers putty called Rodico that looks and feels a bit like Blu-Tack.
A good rub with that on blackened silver cleans it up a treat, and does no damage.
It's a minor correction but it could be important for some people to know, all tarnish removers are abrasive, the only way to non-destructively remove tarnish is by electrochemical process.

Electrolysis is the only method where absolutely zero silver is lost, the tarnish which still contains silver is chemically reversed instead of being scrubbed off.

This is not to say it can't change the finish, even when no silver is lost a pitted piece will keep an uneven surface.
 
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Morrison Jeremiah

Preferred Member
Jun 25, 2021
1,015
3,438
England
It's a minor correction but it could be important for some people to know, all tarnish removers are abrasive, the only way to non-destructively remove tarnish is by electrochemical process.

Electrolysis is the only method where absolutely zero silver is lost, the tarnish which still contains silver is chemically reversed instead of being scrubbed off.

This is not to say it can't change the finish, even when no silver is lost a pitted piece will keep an uneven surface.
Rodico Is neither an abrasive or a tarnish remover, though it does remove tarnish.
You say electrolysis removes zero silver. but silver tarnish is in fact silver, but in a different state.

Silver tarnish can be removed and applied to another metal, then polished up,
It will then look like silver and actually be silver as we know it.
 
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mawnansmiff

Preferred Member
Oct 14, 2015
6,009
3,083
Sunny Cornwall, UK.
"I used to live close to the old Sterling silver mine. It's what Stirling silver got it's name from."

Absolute tripe. The term is older than America.

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the most plausible etymology of sterling silver is a derivation from a late Old English steorling (with (or like) a 'little star'), as some early Norman silver pennies were imprinted with a small star.

Also....

"One of the earliest attestations of the term is in Old French form esterlin, in a charter of the abbey of Les Préaux, dating to either 1085 or 1104. The English chronicler Orderic Vitalis (1075 – c. 1142) uses the Latin forms libræ sterilensium and libræ sterilensis monetæ."

Regards,

Jay.
 

cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
27,814
43,365
Helena, Alabama
Ha ha, sterling is not a particular type of silver. It is an alloy. Silver is mined as an oar that has to be smelted to become pure 99.9% silver, but pure silver is almost unusable as anything. It is soft enough to be bitten by your teeth. So, jewelers add 7.5% copper to it to make harder and more durable.

Also, patinas can be used to protect the metal. I've never seen evidence of it pitting the metal, and I have seen thousands of pounds of it in my work. But, it could be that we see patinas on old jewelry and other items that get some rough treatments, and removing the patina reveals those damages, but it is not from just the oxidation.
 
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cosmicfolklore

Preferred Member
Aug 9, 2013
27,814
43,365
Helena, Alabama
So, jewelers add 7.5% copper to it to make harder and more durable.
Crap, I also meant to say that by adding 7.25% makes it 925 or sterling silver. The whole point of my post was to relate it to sterling. Before the sterling standard was enacted, every jeweler added his own recipe's percentage of copper or God knows what to the alloy. So, the melting points were affected, making it so that a jeweler had no idea what alloy, heating point the metal had, or even how much pressure the metal could take to bend and form it. Setting the sterling standard made it so now everyone knows what the melting and soldering temp it has and has standardized repairing and working with it as a metal. Except Mexican silver... it has about 10% copper, and most jewelers won't touch it.