First Brylon Pipe in Fifty Years

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gregprince

Member
Jan 29, 2014
276
0
I recently bought a lot of 9 pipes. They were dirt cheap, which was about right. Several will be nice small pipes, good for a short smoke. One is a Drinkless Kaywoodie, another is the first brylon I've ever owned. It's a TAR GARD Billiard by Venturi. Probably my last.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
35,642
35,357
What keeps Brylon pipes in the market? You'd have thought they'd have faded years ago. I'm mystified.

 

aldecaker

Preferred Member
Feb 13, 2015
4,407
32
I too am mystified. On another forum I check out regularly, but am not a member of, there is a fellow who did what he called a "Brylon Challenge". Following the posts, it appears that his experience was far more pleasant than one would expect. I believe he used a Yello-Bole, and actually got good results with it. To me it's all ???, but the market dictates. Some people must actually enjoy them, so to each their own. Hell, look at our own debates about Mixture 79. It's still going strong, but many a well-loved blend has long since gone by the boards.

 

Perique

Preferred Member
Sep 20, 2011
4,098
3,874
www.tobaccoreviews.com
My first pipe was a Brylon and some Captain Black. 1992. The experience caused me to miss out on over a decade of pipesmoking pleasure.
It took me that long to recover my sensation of taste.

 

frozenchurchwarden

Preferred Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,936
2,300
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerogel
I want a pipe made of this stuff.
You couldn't pack it very much, and the shank would have to be really fancy (structural jymnastics), but it would weigh next to nothing and be impossible to burn out.

 

settersbrace

Preferred Member
Mar 20, 2014
1,565
5
I've read they make excellent "taster" pipes for reviewing blends. They can literally be washed clean.

 

frozenchurchwarden

Preferred Member
Mar 1, 2014
2,936
2,300
http://www.thepipe.info/history/index.html

And then we have those graphite alloy pipes from back in the 80's.
I still think it's interesting that this industry has been so resistant to new materials for so long. Though I guess if the consumer base hasn't changed much in the last 50 years that kind of makes sense.
A few years ago I heard about acetylated wood. It sounds like that process could take your standard Briar and make it just about impervious to moisture. Maybe that could finally bring us the right combination of convenience and cultural acceptance.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acetylated_wood

 

newbroom

Preferred Member
Jul 11, 2014
5,861
3,540
There was a pipesmagazine radio podcast featuring a "The Pipe" collector who extolled their virtues. After listening to it, I revisited my two early pipe acquisitions with renewed purpose.

With proper technique, these are a valuable addition to my collection and often are what I carry along when I'm away from 'the house'. I have a The Pipe and a brylon yello-bole. Inexpensive, indestructible, and not unattractive.

They do not impart any additional flavors when maintained, and their 'engineering' allows for easy draw, and cleaning.

 

davet

Preferred Member
May 9, 2015
3,813
286
Estey's Bridge N.B Canada
My first pipe, some 35 years ago, was a Brylon .I still smoke it occasionally, it smokes fine and I get no taste other than the tobacco. I can't really see what makes these such a horrible thing, same with aros and cobs, some people gotta have something to look down on.

 

mso489

Preferred Member
Feb 21, 2013
35,642
35,357
Bylon pipes are about the lowest price pipes other than cobs. I think that must be their attraction for new pipe smokers, and perhaps some are satisfied and stick with them. For people who accumulate too many briars and cobs anyway, a Brylon would be a redundancy. But at the price, I can see having one as a curiosity. They are extremely durable (reportedly); some are nicely shaped; and most have an old, known name like Yello-Bole or Medico. I'd buy one that is exceedingly attractive, since looking at it might be it's major function.

 

brass

Preferred Member
Jun 4, 2014
1,840
5
United States
It has been decades since I smoked a Brylon. Happy to hear that they are still around. I do't recall if they benefitted from a break in period or if they polished up nicely.

 

brewshooter

Preferred Member
Jun 2, 2011
1,658
2
They are a little heavy and tend to get hot, but are nearly indestructible. I have two and they are generally the pipes I take with me when travelling. They will definitely remain a part of my collection.

 

gregprince

Member
Jan 29, 2014
276
0
It looked pretty rough when I got it. Stains on the bowl and a very heavy cake on the bottom half of he bowl. I sanded it with very fine sandpaper and micro mesh pads. Took down the cake and it looks as good as new. I'd say pretty darned close to indestructible.

 

mortonbriar

Preferred Member
Oct 25, 2013
1,529
1,733
I have an orange brylon billiard by venturi that says 'the pipe' on it i think, i got it with an estate lot and cannot bring myself to smoke it, if anyone is so inclined they can PM me and I will send it in exchange for a couple of flakes of something or whatever.
Isaac

 

sallow

Preferred Member
Jun 30, 2013
1,485
3,198
Fun fact, the Knudsen effect was actually named for teddy Knudsen.
Oh, sorry, not true.

 
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